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Discussion Starter #1
My new dog hates getting her nails trimmed. They have been done once by me, which was not to much problem, once by the vet and I am attempting to do it again. She is terrible. She will pull away and has even showed signs of wanting to bite. What can I do?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have been trying to handle her paws but will do a better job of it. I also have a Dremel tool. I will give that a try to see how she reacts to it. Thanks for your fast reply. Anyone else have any suggestions?
 

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The best site is still doberdawn, really great photos of what a trimmed nail looks like and how to train the dog to be happy about trimming and lots of hints on equipment and safety.

I practically sat on my first dog's head and it took 2 of us to get nails clipped. Lots of food and the dremel changed things so I could do it easily and she was fine with it to the point she would tremble rather than fuss when the dremel heated up or I was close to the quick.

Take your time, as long as the nails aren't growing all the way around like Bucky's rear dew claws were, it isn't a severe health risk having too long nails and with a new dog you need time to build trust. I've had Bucky for 2 months minus 1 day and he is allowing me to dremel every one of his 20 nails a little every other day now but I started out just petting him, stroking down his legs, picking up feet and handling and so on - with lots of tiny treats and praise. Once I could roll a nail between my fingers, he didn't freak out at the sound of the dremel and I could actually use a nail file on his nails, pretending to dremel with no mandrel on the rotating motor I started out. I did some handling daily for very short periods of time, grooming his coat was part of the sessions and I would trade off what I did daily depending on what I was comfortable doing and what he seemed up to.

I did get mouthed early on a couple times but interesting to me once he grabbed my hand and I froze until he let go I could go on with what I had been doing for a couple seconds which was nice enough but the really interesting thing was the following day he would be fine with whatever was too much for him the day before. He was preventing me from continuing, not biting to make me stop. It was wait, slow down I need to think about this rather than stop you are scaring me. Bucky was surrendered as a fear biter so this was an extremely nice response on his part.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I have watched a few videos. I will check out the doberdawn site. I hope she allows me to do this without it frightening her.
 

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don't blame yourself !!! I have a two big babies too... I show them the clippers first so we both know up front what we are working towards.. I even open and close them which makes the noise.. Call them too me on the futon to get them to lay down over my lap, to give me their paw.. clip one nail and hug and release... that they all done.. big baby.... I can do it several times or I can do it just one a day....
 

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I suspect most dogs dislike getting their feet handled. Clippers on their nails and that sharp hard click is very scary. Just read up and work on it. Long nails aren't good for the dog but it is fine to take as long as you need to get her used to the whole thing. I did a couple of touches to Bucky's nails at first and it took a long time to get to that point. I have an easier time with the dremel as even if dog wiggles the worst that happens is it tangles in feathers and spooks the dog a little. With clippers I risked getting too close to a quick.

I do as Patricia suggests, mix the dremeling with handling and hugs and cookies and then some brushing then back to the dremel. It is more neutral non scary handling if you forget which nail you were going to work on next.
 
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