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Hello everyone.

My wife and I just adopted our first puppy. His name is Jack. He is a Beagle/Jack Russell Mix (Jack-a-Bee) and I think he has some boxer in him as well. He is about 13-14 weeks old.

We have a problem with Biting. I know he is playing but he has drawn blood on my hand twice now. I have been doing some reading and talked to some trainers and they say that when he bites to yelp like a puppy to make him stop.

Well when jack bites and we yelp he gets more excited and starts to nip more. The more you try to get him to stop the more wound up he gets. Eventually I have to take him into the Kitchen and confine him there until he calms down.

I have also tried redirecting him to a toy or his pizzle stick ( I think that is how you spell it) but he only hold on to it for a moment before coming after us again.

I though it may be a dominance thing but I can look him in the eyes and he will lay down flat (when he is not wound up). He also rolls over on his back and shows us his belly allot.

I take him on a mile walk daily and sometimes I take him twice. I play fetch with him and am working on training him to sit and lay down which I read will wear them out mentally. After walks and I am starting to jog with him in places on our route he will lay down on the floor like he is tired, but once he starts play biting he gets a second wind and eventually we are putting him in the kitchen to calm down.

Anyone here have any other tips that have worked for you?
 

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My pup would sometimes become more excited after I would yelp a couple times. I would continue to yelp...Loudly enough to get his attention. If he continues to bite, after the yelping has failed a couple times. I would put him in a time out...Immediately after another bite. My dog hated going out on our enclosed deck. So when he got to riled up I would put him out there and let him back in after a minute or two. A few times of doing this and he should start biting less for fear of boring time outs.
 

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It's not dominance. Biting is totally normal for a puppy. It's the way they play and the way they explore the world. It's kind of like how a human baby puts everything in his/her mouth; it's just what they do. That said, it's not acceptable in the human world, so you have to teach him bite inhibition.

There is a sticky at the top of the page called "The Bites Stops Here." Read the sticky, it has great advice.
The yelping thing does tend to work. HOWEVER, some puppies do get more excited by a high pitched yelp sound. So, if the yelp doesn't work, say "ouch!" very loudly in a lower pitch (but not angrily).

The basic idea to "The Bite Stops Here" is this:
- the puppy bites, you make the noise (ouch or yelp) to get his attention and let him know you didn't like that.
- he will probably stop for a second, and then go right back to biting/nipping; it's what they do.
- SO, make the noise again, but this time, also leave the room for 20-30 seconds. (Any longer than that and he will forget why you left and the teaching connection will be lost)
Follow this system: first the noise, if he does it again, then you make the noise and leave the room. Then, when you come back, if he does it again you start over, the noise first, then the noise + leaving if he does it again.

YES, it's a hassle to keep leaving the room. My fiance hated this part of puppy training. It cut into his TV time. But, if you aren't consistent and do it EVERY time, he will keep biting. He has to know that if he doesn't respond to just the noise, he will lose contact with you. And, since dogs are very social, this should bother him to have you leave the room.

Don't expect results right away. You aren't just trying to get him to STOP biting for that second, you're trying to TEACH him something, so it takes lots of repetition and time. Our first dog took about 4 weeks to stop completely. The second one about 1.5-2 weeks, and the third (our foster dog) about 3 weeks.
 

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I disagree with using "no". I know, I always say this when anyone recommends using it. The thing is, we use no so often that WE (and our dogs) can become desensitized to it. I know, I am guilty myself, but with my students at school. "No, don't touch the open fingerpaint jar, no, no, NO NONONO!" (as you see purple fingerpaint running down onto the floor). So, a simple word, "no" has all of a sudden become "no" and "NO" and "NONONONO", none of which dogs understand as just plain "no", because dogs understand sounds not words.

Anyhow, since "no" can apply to so, so many situations, it doesn't really teach, it just interrupts or gets their attention. It doesn't teach them that they should NEVER do whatever bad behavior they are doing at the moment, it just stops them temporarily.

Really, try "The Bite Stops Here."

But, I totally agree with simplicity and patience. :)
 

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What do you do with a puppy that follows you out of the room?? I have been trying to do this with my roommates dog but when I leave the room, she just comes trotting behind me nipping at my feet usually.
 

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@ CJay: be faster than she is. Head toward a room with a door that you can shut behind you, don't talk to her or look at her as you are walking toward that door. As you get to the door, turn and use your body to block her, go into the room, and shut the door.

If that doesn't work, you can always adapt it to putting THE PUPPY in a different room instead of yourself. But, make sure that you don't use the crate as time-out when the puppy is nipping/biting, because she may start to see the crate in a negative light.
 

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Anyhow, since "no" can apply to so, so many situations, it doesn't really teach, it just interrupts or gets their attention. It doesn't teach them that they should NEVER do whatever bad behavior they are doing at the moment, it just stops them temporarily.

Really, try "The Bite Stops Here."

But, I totally agree with simplicity and patience. :)
I totally agree. Unless you are only ever going to use "no" to mean one thing, no is worthless. Dogs don't generalize, so when you try to use no to mean "don't pee there", "don't touch that" AND "don't bite me", the dog is never going to know what you want.

Be a Tree works, you just have to be consistent and patient with it.
 
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