Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A few months ago, around April, I noticed a small growth on the underside of Z's jaw, a little smaller than a pea. I took him to the vet and she said it was a sebaceous cyst. She told me that it may grow bigger, may go away, or it could ulcerate and to keep an eye on it.

At the beginning of July I took him in for a yeast infection in his ear. By this time the cyst had grown to about the size of two peas. My vet took note of it but wasn't too concerned with the growth and said that she would check it when we came in for Z's vaccinations.

Today was Z's vaccination appointment. The cyst is now about 2cm long and 1cm wide. This appointment was with the clinics new vet, instead of the one we'd been seeing. She was very concerned with how rapidly it had been growing and suggested we remove it to make sure it's nothing worse. We did pull blood for pre-anesthetic tests.

I'm just curious if anyone has seen something like this before?

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,911 Posts
Did the original vet or the new vet take a fine needle aspirate of the cyst to ensure it was a sebaceous cyst? How long has it been growing?

Sebaceous cysts are filled with fluid and usually either resolve or erupt on their own. It seems odd that a sebaceous cyst would grow that quickly, and to me, it doesn't look like the cysts I've seen previously (although that does not mean it's not sebaceous, just odd looking).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
No, neither vet did a fine needle aspirate. Both vets closely examined the cyst and felt the rest of his body to see if he had more. I first noticed it in April so it's been growing for about 5 months now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,911 Posts
It makes me nervous that they're assuming it's a sebaceous cyst without even doing a need aspirate of it to make sure there's fluid inside, especially because it hasn't resolved itself, as most sebaceous cysts do.

I suppose, no matter what it is, I'd personally have it removed. However, if it's a benign sebaceous cyst that isn't interfering with his quality of life, it's not necessary to remove it, just an aesthetic choice. Which is why I'm surprised that the vet is suggesting removal of something they assume is benign without first confirming what it is and giving you the option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,075 Posts
We had aspirites done on all of Gypsy's lumps. They really aren't that expensive. 2 were begin cysts that the vet recommended we not have removed unless they started to bother her. 1 was fatty tissue, which we then had biopsied to make sure it wasn't cancerous. Whether or not a tumor is cancerous may change the treatment and determine how aggressive they are with removal of surrounding areas. I would recommend you have it aspirated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,911 Posts
We had aspirites done on all of Gypsy's lumps. They really aren't that expensive. 2 were begin cysts that the vet recommended we not have removed unless they started to bother her. 1 was fatty tissue, which we then had biopsied to make sure it wasn't cancerous. Whether or not a tumor is cancerous may change the treatment and determine how aggressive they are with removal of surrounding areas. I would recommend you have it aspirated.
Yes, absolutely. What I was kind of trying to softly suggest is that I'm worried about the quality of veterinary care OP's dog is receiving if they're suggesting removal of what they're saying is a benign tumor without aspirating it first.

It just doesn't really add up, unless they're trying to get more money out of OP for a removal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I've always been very happy with my vet. She's always put Z first and been reassuring whenever something was wrong. The new vet is the one that is suggesting removal and this was the first time I had met her. I believe she started a couple months ago and unlike Dr. Parr when I mentioned Z's allergies she started talking about the Royal Canin prescription diets, which I wasn't too crazy about. I suppose part of the reason I posted on here was because we went from Dr. Parr wanting to keep an eye on the cyst to the new vet wanting to remove it. They should be calling in the next few days about his bloodwork so I'll ask them about doing a fine needle aspirate before surgery. Thank you for all your input
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,911 Posts
I've always been very happy with my vet. She's always put Z first and been reassuring whenever something was wrong. The new vet is the one that is suggesting removal and this was the first time I had met her. I believe she started a couple months ago and unlike Dr. Parr when I mentioned Z's allergies she started talking about the Royal Canin prescription diets, which I wasn't too crazy about. I suppose part of the reason I posted on here was because we went from Dr. Parr wanting to keep an eye on the cyst to the new vet wanting to remove it. They should be calling in the next few days about his bloodwork so I'll ask them about doing a fine needle aspirate before surgery. Thank you for all your input
Not a problem and I hope everything goes well. It's amazing how much veterinary care can not only differ from place to place, but even vet to vet. I have a vet I absolutely love at my regular office, and another I kind of avoid if I can help it.

I think some vets tend to be "let's keep an eye on it and see how it goes" and others tend to be "let's cut it off and see how it goes". Sounds like you've encountered one of each :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,075 Posts
I still don't know why neither vet recommended aspirating it. You can't tell if a lump is malignant or not just by looking at it and 'keeping and eye' on it. Chances are it's begin, but if it were me I would want to know for sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,895 Posts
I still don't know why neither vet recommended aspirating it. You can't tell if a lump is malignant or not just by looking at it and 'keeping and eye' on it. Chances are it's begin, but if it were me I would want to know for sure.
My vet doesn't biopsy like... anything, ever. I think it comes from working in an area where most people can't really afford it. If you want labs done, you really have to ask and push for it. I'm going to have to do that with Jack because his 'it's a lick granuloma' thing with Jack isn't doing it for me. The lump is still there, and seems to be getting bigger. OTOH, I'll admit freely that at Jack's age I probably wouldn't do more than aggressively remove the lump, anyway, so. Not sure knowing would gain me much, and that may have something to do with my vet's casual attitude about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,911 Posts
My vet doesn't biopsy like... anything, ever. I think it comes from working in an area where most people can't really afford it. If you want labs done, you really have to ask and push for it. I'm going to have to do that with Jack because his 'it's a lick granuloma' thing with Jack isn't doing it for me. The lump is still there, and seems to be getting bigger. OTOH, I'll admit freely that at Jack's age I probably wouldn't do more than aggressively remove the lump, anyway, so. Not sure knowing would gain me much, and that may have something to do with my vet's casual attitude about it.
I've had so many fine needle aspirates done on my dogs. They're cheap and simple. My vet doesn't push for them, but recommended that I have it done on a suspected lipoma a while ago, and now I ask for them on anything I feel looks suspicious or is growing more rapidly than I'd like.

I don't think it's good veterinary care to *push* tests on people who can't afford it, but I do think it's basic veterinary care to not diagnose something as benign without proof, and I think quality vets lay all the owner's options before them. I get the feeling OP wasn't even offered the option of aspirating, only leaving it alone or removing it.

As it is, I hope OP gets an aspirate done, it's benign and then he/she can decide whether to remove the lump for aesthetics or leave it alone because it's not negatively effecting their dog!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,075 Posts
Maybe vets around here are more proactive? I go to a few different vets and all 3 have recommended doing an aspirate on Gypsy's lumps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
The vet called today, Z's blood work came back just fine. I asked about doing a fine needle aspirate and she said that we could do that before proceeding to surgery to make sure that it really does need removed. Z has an appointment for Wednesday morning to get it aspirated, although now I've got myself worried and am thinking of changing it to Monday after work to get it done sooner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,226 Posts
My vet doesn't biopsy like... anything, ever. I think it comes from working in an area where most people can't really afford it. If you want labs done, you really have to ask and push for it. I'm going to have to do that with Jack because his 'it's a lick granuloma' thing with Jack isn't doing it for me. The lump is still there, and seems to be getting bigger. OTOH, I'll admit freely that at Jack's age I probably wouldn't do more than aggressively remove the lump, anyway, so. Not sure knowing would gain me much, and that may have something to do with my vet's casual attitude about it.
Yeah, I talked to my vet about biopsying my 15-year-old Queenie's probably-a-lipoma-lump, and he was like, "Would knowing be helpful?" After some consideration, I had to acknowledge that it probably would not. He's primarily a livestock vet, and it shows.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,895 Posts
Yeah, I talked to my vet about biopsying my 15-year-old Queenie's probably-a-lipoma-lump, and he was like, "Would knowing be helpful?" After some consideration, I had to acknowledge that it probably would not. He's primarily a livestock vet, and it shows.
It's going to sound horrible, but aesthetics are most of the reason I'm likely to get around to removing that thing, eventually. I also feel weird saying 9 is old enough that if it was something I wouldn't do more than aggressively remove it, but. ...Well, it is what it is. Bottom line is, he's NOT ancient, but he's not young, either. He also seems to be acting perfectly healthy right now and for the entire time that lumps been there, and if it *is* a cancer, it's likely one that has two options: confined to skin and removing is the answer or b-) something that spreads in such a way that the prognosis is very, very poor.

So it's sort of a real no huge benefit to knowing definitively. Either it's not a big deal and can be removed when and if we want, or it's a big enough deal that knowing wouldn't make a difference, anyway, because even aggressive treatment options aren't going to make much difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Another question for those of you who have had lumps aspirated before. Did your vet give your dog an injection to help slow the spreading of the cancer? When I asked my vet about doing the aspirate she said that they also always give that injection. I can't remember what she said the injection was but that it would slow down the spreading of the cancer. I've tried googling to figure out what it is and if it's really necessary. Did any of your dogs get an injection like this or does anyone have any idea what it might be?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,341 Posts
I don't quite understand, but I'm not a Vet or an expert with cancer.

Shep has had lots of needle aspirations, which turned out to be harmless fatty lipomas. After the test, the Vet didn't do anything else, so I don't know what would happen if the Vet had found cancer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,075 Posts
Another question for those of you who have had lumps aspirated before. Did your vet give your dog an injection to help slow the spreading of the cancer? When I asked my vet about doing the aspirate she said that they also always give that injection. I can't remember what she said the injection was but that it would slow down the spreading of the cancer. I've tried googling to figure out what it is and if it's really necessary. Did any of your dogs get an injection like this or does anyone have any idea what it might be?
I've never heard of anything like that. Maybe someone with more knowledge can chime in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,186 Posts
Another question for those of you who have had lumps aspirated before. Did your vet give your dog an injection to help slow the spreading of the cancer? When I asked my vet about doing the aspirate she said that they also always give that injection. I can't remember what she said the injection was but that it would slow down the spreading of the cancer. I've tried googling to figure out what it is and if it's really necessary. Did any of your dogs get an injection like this or does anyone have any idea what it might be?
I found this

Ask your vet about intralesional triamcinolone. They may have not used it before, so do not be surprised, but they can access the info easily (1 mg per cm q 2-3 weeks SQ). It is an simple injection of a form of cortisone that most vets will have sitting on their shelves. It is not very expensive, and very common. Every 2-3 weeks, your vet can inject the mast cell tumor, or infuse the area where the mast cell tumor was removed, with a small dose of this drug. The direct contact of the triamcinolone with any mast cells left in the body will blast them pretty good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Thanks for the info! That may be what she's talking about. I'll have to ask her more about it tomorrow. Thanks for finding that for me.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top