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OK - I'm terribly upset by this - I took my collie to my groomer who I've been using for the past two tears (and very happy with) and asked to have have short cut on her - for the first time ever. We live in Idaho, but will be taking her to Texas for the summer where she will be staying at my sister's ranch completely outside in the Texas heat (where she's usually indoors anyhow) - Not only did I want a short cut to keep the burs out, etc, she isn't used to any heat, much less 110 degree Texas heat, and at 10 years old, is just going to melt at the sudden change, so I tough a short coat was in order. The groomer mistook this, and now my beautiful girl has a shaved lion cut on her!

Please, no lectures on shaving double coated collies, etc - or the possibility of it not growing back right, etc. I need words of encouragement and some idea of how long it will take until my girl starts to look like a normal collie again - even a "puppy" cut look - which I guess was what I wanted, but wasn't as clear as I should have been.
 

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I will say that keeping her coat would have better helped her acclimate to the Texas heat, and being shaved short makes it harder for her to regulate her body temperature.

But as far as how long it will take. I would expect about two years of perfect coat care to get back to being what a rough collie's coat normally is
 

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Id be more worried about her out side 24/7 with no coat to protect her. IF it does grow back, it will take a long while. Most double coated dogs who get shaved at my shop are goldens, and they take about a year, and normally their cpats are junk after. Not sure whay they would lion cut her?
 

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She will be fine. As with any dog, coated or not, just use common sense in the heat and sun. In 6 months her coat will be at a decent fluffy lwngth, but it will take a year or so for her to have the longer full coat. Since she is older, it may take longer. Keep her brushed and combed at least weekly to stimulate hair growth and healthy skin and circulation. Bathing often ( weekly ideally) also grows coat faster. Put her on salmon oil supplement if she isnt already, and feed a quality grain free food. If you notice that her coat is coming back funky, have a thyroid test at the vets. Many older dogs have underlying thyroid issues that can cause that. I shave lots of doublecoated breeds when the owners ask for it. None have died yet. ;-) Its just hair.
 

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Its just hair.
It's not just hair. It's insulation. Which means keeping warmth in and cold out in winter, and heat *out* in the summer.

That said: OP: Use sunscreen on that dog and keep a close eye on her. Those temperatures are brutal for a dog not acclimated to them.
 

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You're going to leave your dog outside? In TEXAS? I'm in Oklahoma and it was way over 100 today. And it's not even July yet. My dogs get to play outside in the early a.m. and around twilight. And even then, I'm keeping an eye on them to make sure they don't overheat. And they've lived here most of their lives.
 

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It's not just hair. It's insulation. Which means keeping warmth in and cold out in winter, and heat *out* in the summer.

That said: OP: Use sunscreen on that dog and keep a close eye on her. Those temperatures are brutal for a dog not acclimated to them.
It is just hair. This is a domesticated dog, not a wild animal. Domestic dog breeds are too closely related for me to believe that a full coated collie stays cooler than a doberman, because of an "insulated" coat. If that were the case, dobes and other short coated dogs would be overheating and dropping dead left and right. When its hot, its hot, whether short or long coats. Thats where common sense comes into play.
 

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It is just hair. This is a domesticated dog, not a wild animal. Domestic dog breeds are too closely related for me to believe that a full coated collie stays cooler than a doberman, because of an "insulated" coat. If that were the case, dobes and other short coated dogs would be overheating and dropping dead left and right. When its hot, its hot, whether short or long coats. Thats where common sense comes into play.
Yeah, if the insulating quality of double coats was as integral as many make it sound you would think hairless breeds would be dying in droves. I believe that it can probably serve a function in extreme conditions, but most pets aren't living in extreme conditions and it doesn't sound like this dog will be.

We live in Idaho, but will be taking her to Texas for the summer where she will be staying at my sister's ranch completely outside in the Texas heat (where she's usually indoors anyhow)
 

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Yeah, if the insulating quality of double coats was as integral as many make it sound you would think hairless breeds would be dying in droves. I believe that it can probably serve a function in extreme conditions, but most pets aren't living in extreme conditions and it doesn't sound like this dog will be.
Guessing you've never been in TX in the summer?

Originally Posted by Cheeseliz
We live in Idaho, but will be taking her to Texas for the summer where she will be staying at my sister's ranch completely outside in the Texas heat (where she's usually indoors anyhow)
 

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Guessing you've never been in TX in the summer?

Originally Posted by Cheeseliz
We live in Idaho, but will be taking her to Texas for the summer where she will be staying at my sister's ranch completely outside in the Texas heat (where she's usually indoors anyhow)
Pretty sure there was a miswording somewhere in here because the statements contradict themselves.
 

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The fact that you are considering leaving her outside all the time in a new climate is extremely worrisome to me.

It'll probably take a long while before her coat is back to normal. I'd say upwards of a year or two. We got our old golden shaved one summer it it took almost a full year before he was even fluffy again.
 

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I think about two years for the new coat. Rescue Collies are sometimes shaved because of the matting that their coats have taken while on the run, or due to owner neglect.

As a long time (and multiple) Collie owner I would agree with the folks who speak of the two coats...it is important as an insulator. It is a system that they have been gifted with to handle the elements of their original environments. I think we make a mistake when we lump breeds together, as far as their protection goes. A Collie is far different from a Poodle which (I think) can be shaved regularly.

As far as problems in the Texas heat, I recommend you contact the good folks at Texas Collie and Sheltie Rescue. http://www.texascollierescue.org/ I have no doubt that they have shaved many a Collie (for the reasons posted above) and will have some sound advice for you.

Good Luck!
 

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It is just hair. This is a domesticated dog, not a wild animal. Domestic dog breeds are too closely related for me to believe that a full coated collie stays cooler than a doberman, because of an "insulated" coat. If that were the case, dobes and other short coated dogs would be overheating and dropping dead left and right. When its hot, its hot, whether short or long coats. Thats where common sense comes into play.
(taken from: http://www.vetinfo.com/dog-fur-hair-difference.html)
Hair Has a Longer Growth Cycle

One difference in determining hair from fur is the growing cycle. Hair has various growth phases and the length of the various phases helps determine if people consider the dog's coat to be fur or hair.

Anagen is the phase of new hair growth.
Catagen is the transition phase where hair stops growing and the outer root sheath attaches to the hair.
Telogen is the resting phase.
Exogen is when the hair falls out and the follicle moves back into the anagen phase. The exogen phase is typically longer during warm months as the undercoats and excess hair are used as insulation during cold weather.
Hair seems to continuously grow, having a longer anagen phase, while coats that continuously shed have shorter anagen hair growth phases and are called fur.

Fur and Hair Have Different Textures

Texture is also a key factor in distinguishing hair from fur.

Hair tends to be longer and finer in texture, and will frequently be wavy or curly. It is this curliness that actually traps the shedding hair and dander inside the coat, giving the appearance that the coat doesn't shed and doesn't produce allergic reactions. It is this factor, along with absence of an undercoat, that gives the impression that certain breeds are allergen-free.
Fur is typically shorter and more dense in texture, with a finer undercoat during the colder months for warmth. Because the shedding hair easily drops from the dog, it only appears that the shedding is more profuse than the finer hair coat.
also, i have discussed this w/ 3 different professional groomers that have all said the same thing......they WILL NOT shave double coated dogs as it ruins the insulating "factor" of the coat.......they each said that they tell people to go elswhere if they insist on shaving rather than shedding out (really getting "deep")......having BC's i was curious about it.....

or, look here (even tho it's BC related it still pertains to the double coated dogs)
http://www.bcrescue.org/shaving.html
 
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