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I was out walking my guys on a multi-user trail this morning. As we were going uphill through a twisty section I could see 2 older gentlemen coming up behind us on their mountain bikes. Running between the 2 bikes was a tall, thin, fawn colored dog. At first I couldn't tell what kind of dog it was. It looked like a young, not yet filled out, Great Dane. I called my dogs to the side of the trail and had them sit so the men, who were working much harder than I was, could ride by.

As they came up to me I realized that their dog was a greyhound, a beautiful, brindle guy. The men stopped to chat with me for a minute and catch their breath. The dog was a bit skittish around the collies, but he leaned right up against me so I could scratch his butt. I always forget just how tall greyhounds are. He made my collies, both 75 pounds, look short and stocky.

The guys didn't stop for long. So I only got to ask the owner if the dog was a retired racer. He wasn't. The man had had him since he was a puppy.

Then off they went. The greyhound just loped along behind his owner, off leash. What totally amazed me was how focused the dog was on his owner. Right now we are critter central. There are ground squirrels and lizards everywhere. The greyhound just ignored them all and followed his owner.

I didn't know that greyhounds came in a brindle, either.

I think I'm in love.
 

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They're easy to love... And beautiful! It's pretty amazing that the dog was off leash, but it's probably because he had never been a racer.

I fostered this guy...
 

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I've often thought of getting a grey. I like to run, but I'm fat and out of shape so me running ends up being running for a block and then walking for the next mile and half trying to recover. I think a grey could handle that. They'd probably jump my 4 foot fence without even thinking though.
 

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You're right, they would sprint with you, but they aren't big on long distance. Good news is they would crash on the couch with you afterward. :D
 

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Yep...greyhounds can be taught to be off leash if one cares to do it. It's still a risk, as it is with any dog. But, in the "olden days" they used to course with 'em and a dog that won't come back with the dinner it catches isn't of much use ;)

Greyhounds come in about a billion shades of brindle - from light brindle to black brindle and everything in between :)

I've often thought of getting a grey. I like to run, but I'm fat and out of shape so me running ends up being running for a block and then walking for the next mile and half trying to recover. I think a grey could handle that. They'd probably jump my 4 foot fence without even thinking though.
We've had probably about 200 greyhounds on this property with a four foot fence and only one has ever gone over...one of our own, the little PITA. :rolleyes: Mostly they're lazy dogs though.
 

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We've had probably about 200 greyhounds on this property with a four foot fence and only one has ever gone over...one of our own, the little PITA. :rolleyes: Mostly they're lazy dogs though.
Interesting. May have to add "retired racer" to my list of dogs to look into adopting. I don't think they'd be that playful with Zero though and I'd still be afraid they'd see a squirrel or something and be gone.
 

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I think adopting retired greyhounds is great, and I would encourage anyone to do it who is willing to take on the responsibilities of a sight hound.

The only thing is, I have never seen a retired racing greyhound "do" anything. I've never seen them play, or run just for the fun of it, or show any real interest in anything.

There are about half a dozen that come to my dog park, some muzzled, some not, and they all seem to just wander aimlessly around, neither seeking interaction with dogs or people or avoiding it. Absolutely nothing like the whippets and Italian greyhounds that come.
 

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I've seen a retired racer have a TON of fun at a DP once.

The only other one I've known was skittish around people.

Others I've seen at events and stuff were very social, quiet creatures.
 

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The only thing is, I have never seen a retired racing greyhound "do" anything. I've never seen them play, or run just for the fun of it, or show any real interest in anything.
Oh, they play and run all right. Pictures attached.
 

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My friend has two greyhounds. One likes to run with Aurora (for short distances, she'll outrun Aurora but long after she's tired Aurora is still raring to play). She doesn't in general wrestle with Aurora though, they just run around (Aurora loves being chased and I find some dogs she'll run with, some she wrestles and I prefer when she runs). The other one is old and way too lazy to play that much. They're both really lazy inside (Aurora has the right temperment for my perfect dog but they have the perfect energy level ;). Then again, Aurora mostly stays calm inside and I can take her for a hike if I wish where as I'm sure I'd have to do a very short hike if I were to have her dogs).

I'm guessing they could take that dog on a bike ride probaly because it wasn't a track dog (track dogs don't tend to get as well taken care of and tend to be pretty stiff and easily tired in my experience. I've gotten to meet one non track dog and she's more energetic plus she knows how to play as she got a real puppyhood but my friend also had a greyhound that would actually play with her toys as well. Though she was one of hte most cheerful greyhounds I met. Most seem morose/serious).
 

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I'm guessing they could take that dog on a bike ride probaly because it wasn't a track dog (track dogs don't tend to get as well taken care of and tend to be pretty stiff and easily tired in my experience. I've gotten to meet one non track dog and she's more energetic plus she knows how to play as she got a real puppyhood but my friend also had a greyhound that would actually play with her toys as well. Though she was one of hte most cheerful greyhounds I met. Most seem morose/serious).
Sigh.

Track dogs are supremely conditioned professional athletes. Trust me when I tell you than a dog at even the crappiest track in the country will be in better shape and condition than 90% of pet greyhounds out there. A track dog, though, won't be conditioned for endurance...it is a sprinting breed and race dogs are bred to be sprinters. It's what they're best at.

I've got no idea where you get the idea that they are "stiff"...Here's our newer girl Bindi just a few weeks off the track...she doesnt look stiff to me


But they can have endurance...my lure coursers run 1000+ yard courses several times a day on back to back days at a sprint. It just takes training and conditioning.


Please don't judge racing dogs because you happen to know some pet retired racers that have been allowed to fall into poor shape by their pet owners.

And most of greyhounds enjoy playing with toys sometimes (though some believe it is beneath them)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7b1ov2DajlA

and sometimes they'll even play with another dog...kinda
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Udqim-aVFRg

But they have been bred for thousands of years to chase. And for the last several decades to race. To most of them, if it's not a race or if there's nothing to chase, it's proably not worth doing. And like most predators (think cheetah) who exert tremendous amounts of energy in a short period of time, they spend a lot of the time either conserving energy for when they might need it, or recovering after exerting a burst of energy.

I've been to greyhound farms and I know how they grow up. They have great puppyhoods and probably grow up more like real dogs than a baby puppy ripped away from their mom at 8-10 weeks old. I wish more dogs could grow up like greyhounds do.


One of the reasons I love greyhounds so much is because they aren't really "doggy" dogs. In fact, I don't even think most greyhounds actually believe they are a dog and won't waste their time playing with stranger dogs at dog parks. It seems many breeds are trapped in a perpetual puppyhood, but greyhounds are one of those breeds that seems to actually "grow up" and mature into a laid back human companion. Not in your face, but by your side.

And many greyhounds won't really show themselves to people they don't know well or trust. Our girl Echo has personality to spare, but most people who know her would think she's shy. Puh-lease. She's anything but shy at home. She just doesn't give her trust to the world at large.

If someone wants a dog to fawn over their every word and puff up their ego and sense of self importance....a greyhound is probably not the breed for them. Of course, once a greyhound gives themselves to you and trusts you, there is no finer feeling. They're not for everyone, but for people who are a match there is no better breed.

Just my two cents with the 26 greyhounds I've owned, over 100 that I've fostered and countless others that I've known. YMMV.
 

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Lovemygreys, I have never in my life seen a Greyhound puppy...not even a picture of one! Thanks for posting that!

ETA: I wish my rear end looked looks like your Greys'...

ETA II: Why are Greys so often muzzled? Are they known for dog aggression? Also, due to their lack of body fat, they seem so delicate. Are their bones as fragile as they appear to be or are they pretty sturdy?
 

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My next dog will be a retired racer. I've wanted one for YEARS, and I cannot wait to add one to my family!! They are, in my eyes, the perfect companion.
 

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It's funny I've never really cared for greyhounds. Not that I didn't like one, but they worry me because they look so delicate. I always imagined them being the kind of dog that doesn't play or isn't very affectionate. Then I met one! :)

This awesome greyhound that come to the clinic made me fall in love with them! He's a brindle as well and looks just like the picture posted earlier. The owner is adopting a new greyhound pup soon so I will get to meet/see on for the first time!

A while ago Bridgette got to meet a greyhound at the dog park and I don't think she's ever had such a good time with another dog! They played a lot and he was definitely the only dog I've seen who could (naturally) outrun Bridgette.

I am actually thinking I might like one someday, but having two cats might pose a problem.
 

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Lovemygreys, I have never in my life seen a Greyhound puppy...not even a picture of one! Thanks for posting that!

ETA: I wish my rear end looked looks like your Greys'...

ETA II: Why are Greys so often muzzled? Are they known for dog aggression? Also, due to their lack of body fat, they seem so delicate. Are their bones as fragile as they appear to be or are they pretty sturdy?
Here's a pup from a farm I visited...don't remember exactly how old it was, but less than a week old:


Stay tuned to my posts b/c we're going to have some exciting news in the next couple weeks :D


It's hard to believe this (our most recent racing puppy)


Grows up to be this...(our girl Tater/Rights to Riches)
 

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In racing, muzzles are used to help determine the winner in a photo finish. In general, muzzles are kinda like helmets for greyhounds...they're for protection. Greyhounds have very thin skin and a minor snark can result in some pretty big stitches. When you have 20-30 greyhounds turned out together in a turn out pen, if a fight broke out you'd have a bunch of really injured greyhounds. They aren't an aggressive breed, but like all dogs they can have disagreements with other dogs. In fact, greyhounds are not known for aggression and are often the first choice for blood donors or lab experiments b/c they are easily handled and will take a lot of crap before they fight back.

I really don't like people to take greyhounds to dog parks with muzzles because most people don't understand what the muzzle is for and will often just assume the dog is aggressive. In reality, the other dogs in the dog park are a bigger danger to greyhounds than the greyhound is to them. Many breeds are very mouthy when they play which doesn't always end up well for the greyhound. Not to say that they are a delicate breed, but what might be a small puncture in a heavily coated/skinned dog will be a much larger injury in a greyhound with thinner skin, thinner fur and skin that's pulled tightly over their heavily muscled body.

The traditional turn out muzzle you see greyhounds wear allows them to eat, drink and even pick up and toss stuffies. Most don't mind it and even associate it with getting to do something fun, like running or turn outs.

As you can see, we don't muzzle our dogs in the yard (though we do use muzzles in our pack when it's appropriate to do so).
 

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It's hard to believe this (our most recent racing puppy)
Wow. That has got to be the lankiest puppy I've ever seen.

First time I've ever seen a Greyhound puppy, even a picture of one... or any sighthound puppy for that matter. Thanks for sharing!
 

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*backs off slowly* Yeesh, sorry lady. I wasn't trying to be insulting. Calm down ;).

Anyways, wasn't a huge greyhound fan but my friend getting them made me like them a lot better. Cause I can easily see them being a bit aloof. Actually, from my impression it is more that they aren't as expressive. Cause now that I get constant exposure to my friend's dogs and see their personalities, it seems more than I was reading greyhounds wrong (in that they weren't so expressive so I got the impression of them being morose).

I've told my friend many times that honestly, it seems that a greyhound would probably (almost) the ideal dog for me. I say almost cause one thing I realy like about my dog over her greyhounds is my dog is very calm/laid back and not so high strung (may be her dogs, well one of them is way worse than the other two she's had, he's a total scaredy cat). I just don't see a greyhound taking as well to doing stuff like getting in a small airplane (well one big enough to fit the dog) or going fishing with us on my roommate's boat (at least my friend's dogs probably wouldn't take it so well. They seem pretty routine dogs where as my dog seems very take things as they come. Then again, my dog gets bored with routine and I'm more routine than her. Which is another reason I think greyhounds would fit me better).

I mean I love it when my dog calms down and just wants to hang out. But I have to admit when I do take her to a dog park or go out and play with her, it is kinda funny to watch her antics (she loves wrestling with other dogs but her favorite is to be chased by all the dogs which I attribute to her being mostly husky and loving to run. She will play with one of my friend's greyhounds by being chased around by the greyhound). And from what I've seen you just don't see greyhounds doing that so much (but what I've seen is my friend's dogs and the dogs that come into the pet store I work at. You don't tend to see them at the parks and when you do the owners don't unleash them).
 
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