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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have two dogs, not teeny tiny in size or spirit at all but small enough to not be classed as big! I will be taking in a greyhound in a week or so (very excited), and I have read numerous times in my preparation for her that greyhounds very often come with a warning of "they live to chase everything" from outside critters to neighbourhood cats and dogs, and then also the warning if "if you own small dogs this isn't the breed for you!"

However I am firmly in the group of teaching dogs to respect your rules through good reincforcement and leadership, no matter the breed, and simply training them to respect your other dogs! I've seen photos and videos of beautifully trained greyhounds who leave other pets alone, dogs, cats, anything, and even build great bonds with them, and heard accounts of greyhounds calmly ignoring pretty much every kind of animal in and outside of the home - but sadly not much on the how-to of doing this! I have found VERY little information on how to train this with greyhounds (or many sighthounds less specifically) and while I know it to be possible, I was wondering if anyone could give me advice about:
1. How to introduce the greyhound to my dogs when she arrives (my dogs are very other-dog-friendly; however the greyhound has only grown up around other greyhounds and some large dogs so her experience with smallish dogs is highly limited)
2. How to catch a problem and prevent it furthering if chasing occurs, for both her and my own dogs, to keep hopeful friendships an option after a bad experience
3. Any training tips in general to keep problems from coming up right from the beginning!

Also, she is 5 months old.

I'm not expecting perfection, and outside the house will be another story of training, but just concerning my own two dogs... this is important.

Thanks so much in advance,
Fish
 

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While good training and management can definitely help shape behaviors, understand that prey drive is a very strong instinct, especially in dog breeds bred for coursing. The extent to which she'll be manageable around small animals will depend a lot on the genetic temperament of your dog. Do you know what lines she's from? Knowing her parents or close blood relatives and how they behave around smaller animals will give you a good idea what to expect from her.

Since she's old enough to be getting out of the real baby puppy stage, I'd suggest introducing her to your other dogs in a neutral territory if possible. Maybe a group walk, so she can't get too excited and have her first experience with your little girls being chasing them?

Definitely set up good management. I wouldn't leave her (or any new dog, honestly) loose with your current dogs unsupervised until you know her temperament and how all three interact with each other. Monitor play closely and don't be afraid to step in whenever your small girls are looking overwhelmed or uncomfortable, or when play gets too rough. Time-outs may help her learn that only gentle play lets her keep interacting with her new buddies. Work like crazy on recall - sighthounds are notoriously unreliable about that, but training can help. Until you're extremely confident in her recall (which may be never), any time she's not in a securely fenced area she needs to be on a leash or long-line (attached to a harness) for her own safely. Sighthounds are often both physically and temperamentally sensitive dogs, so try to keep all your training as positive and rewards-based as possible!

Be aware that there's something called predatory drift - it's when playful chase behavior triggers predatory instinct in the dog doing the chasing. It can happen in an instant, and a fun play session could wind up with an injured or dead little dog. This is why it's super important to end play when the little guys seem at all stressed (anxious behavior, whining, etc. seem to be more likely to trigger it) and to give your greyhound breaks if she seems too wild and over-stimulated. I'd also add that the behavior you see in her as a puppy and adolescent may not be representative of her adult temperament. Many dogs don't settle fully into their drives and adult personality until 2 or 3.

Basically, supervise supervise supervise! Play lots of recall games with treats so she learns that coming back to you is awesome and doesn't always mean play ends. Susan Garrett's Recallers program is expensive, but excellent, and she has in the past offered some of her basic games for free, so it might be worth keeping an eye on!

I hope someone else comes by with more tips! I know we have some sighthound owners who come by every so often.
 
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