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Discussion Starter #21
I rehomed the puppy. I found the best home for a Heeler possible I think. A farm on 78 acres. They said he may go into their children’s petting zoo that travels around north texas with them. He won’t be crated at night, but will sleep in their bed. Puppy left licking the owners face and was very calm. The puppy took right to this lady BIG time, no wiggling or whining to get down.

The man said they also have horses, cattle and goats. They live way off the main road so he will not likely be hit by a car and will get to run free when at home. The don't crate train , they train to doggie doors.

The man said there isn’t much traffic on the nearest road and theri house sits back off the main road by some distance and for me to call him anytime to check on the pup. She has a aussie shepard that goes everywhere with her... even to work.

These are big time animal people and I think this was a great home for a really great pup. I was sad for a minute but knew this was best for everyone concerned. The puppy was nipping at my older dogs heels yesterday and as he does not get around real well, I could not have this so the decision was made rehome but not to just any home.

I feel like I was more of a foster Dad in all this and I'm ok with that role. The pup ended up having a better home that even I could give him so to that end, it's a happy one.

I will start looking for another dog soon but this time one who is older and one that is more manageable and a less dominant hard headed breed. I learned I should pick dogs with my brain not with my heart and will consider more factors and consider them more carefully next time. In the end, everyone won.
 

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You are a moron and should not be allowed to have a dog.

Breeds are breeds and age is age. I hope you are sterile and cannot reproduce and then try and find a new home for your kid when it keeps you up all night.

The only saving grace is you are taking sleeping pills. Keep going. Your neighbors will agree.

People get beagles and then complain that they bark and howl. Duh!

Please try to be more responsible in the future and find a breed that will be compatible with your "lap of luxury" city living. Or perhaps you can have his throat cut so when he barks he wont' distrub anyone.
 

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Troll alert! Honestly, is it really worth it to join a forum just so you can insult someone on your first post? Ugh.

I don't think it's horrible to re-home a young puppy to an excellent home if you realize you've made a mistake in breed selection. Of course, the breeder should be responsible enough to take the pup back, but we all know that isn't always the case.

I will start looking for another dog soon but this time one who is older and one that is more manageable and a less dominant hard headed breed.
This is a very good idea. It's terrific to have a favorite breed and all, but we do need to be honest with ourselves as to whether we really can provide the proper environment for certain breeds. An ACD in the city is not usually a great idea, unless you're really into dog sports.
 

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It's worth it if gets you to start talking honestly to one another. What is with all the placating talk condoning clearly careless and unthinking behavior. I don't think animals are disposable or some tool for therapy.

Seriously - a rancher who is going to let this dog sleep in his bed, and be part of his traveling petting zoo?
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Your breathe of understanding deviations in breed standards as it relates to parental genetics and individual canine personalities has been the most value add to this thread. Certainly, any Heeler must ride in a pickup truck with a gun rack rather than a BMW to be happy, balanced and healthy. A cattle dog must sleep on a bail of hay rather than a duck down comforter. As you seem to follow this logic, you must also believe Sarah Palin will make an excellent president.

The definition of a moron: A person who believes that reality for themselves is the absolute reality for everyone else. To further clarify for the mentally challenged. “Reality cannot possibly be any other way than the moron perceives it.” Most of us with a brain stem attached realizes that few things in life are black and white. While certain propensities within breeds standards should be duly considered when choosing a pet, environmental influences, training and individual personalities are perhaps just as critical. As breeding for behaviors has been genetically engineered, a person who has learned to recognize certain individual personality properties may often choose dogs who meet the goals of the owner regardless of breed type. If you do NOT follow this logic, then you may also think ALL Pit bulls are ALL killers. Obviously this shows naivety and a lack of neuron transmitter connections by the one who holds to such an idea.

The idiotic notion that living in the city is not a proper home for a dog, is convoluted and narrow at best. For example: My dogs have the best vets in the business. My Blue Heeler who has cancer goes to a Canine Cancer specialist, not some horse, pig, chicken “generalist” vet. My dog does not have one vet but THREE in both standard, as well as holistic medicines. Google Scott Messonnier and you will see his books on this subject. My Heeler is under continued care with this well known Cancer vet. Because I live in the city, I have options in the city that which I will exercise to the benefit of my dog.

If the measure of pet responsibility and quality of life is providing the best care, love and understanding is the mark of the owner; I personally believe a pet owner will exercise all options through canine life cycle and particularly in a moment of duress. My dog has splenic hermangiosarcoma and was bleeding in the abdomen cavity when diagnosed. Rather than putting the dog down at that time, I had the spleen removed at considerable expense and covalence. I am currently attempting to starve off the Cancer cells by cooking a specialized diet. I add supplements in very specific quantities to each bowl of food and speak with at least one Vet every three days to monitor his progress. I will fight for my dog life until I see in his eyes that his time has come and or he looses his quality of life to any great degree. My dog will not suffer above all else. Some, many if not most, would have given up when the terminal cancer was found, but not me. I owe him the best care and will fight for him and with him. Believe what you want about me but, I treat dogs with the respect they deserve in life and will give him a dignified passing should it come to that. If my dog has any quality of life, he will not be put down because it’s more convenient or less expensive for me.

An attack on my parental skills is not only unfounded but cruel. I lost my wife when my son was 8. I raised my son as a single parent. He is 26 last month, and is drug free, Moral, College educated, compassionate beyond exceptions, empathic, well balance and happy in his own skin. You may attack me, but do NOT attack my parental skills, partially when do not know me or my situation.

My neighbors know me very well and my dog. They see me out with my dog 4-10 times a day. My “City” dog gets walks often and long. He was and is, socialized to city noises, socialized to city dogs, socialized to strangers, children’s and other pets. While he does not have a cow to herd or possum to corral, that has not seemed to be a detriment to his personality or happiness. My dog rarely leaves my side. I work from home and have done so since he was a puppy. I rarely leave the house where he does not go. If I go out of town, he goes, if I go the pick up by dry cleaning he goes, go to mothers, he goes, he goes everywhere with me that is safe and appropriate. In the 8 years I have had him, there has been only a few times we have not been side by side. He sleeps in the bed and by my side as I type this because he wants to be.

This new puppy was mostly all about my older dog. As he always seemed to love puppies and small children, I had hopes that this would give him a higher quality of life and some interests. It did not work out that way but I will never regret the decision to try. In retrospect, my older heeler did have interest in the new puppy beyond my expectations. He became a father figure, looking over the well being of the puppy when the puppy cried. The older dog would sleep next to the puppies crate instead of the bed and would “check” the puppy when he came back from going outside. The puppy would have been a welcomed member in his family under different circumstances, however my older dog has days when the cancer takes it’s toll more than others. The puppy had no “off” switch and could not grasp the concept to leave the sick dog alone for any period of time. Not the puppies fault, not the older dogs fault, just the situation was not optimal.

While I had the puppy only 4 days, I worked with him fairly extensively with my older dog by his side. In the last day before he was rehomed, he knew his name, would come when called. He would go to the top of the stairs and bark when he needed to go potty. I took him out when I should and praised and gave him treats when he potties. Less than 7 weeks old, he was well on his way on being another great dog. Even the play biting was down 50% due to my working with the dog. I am not one to leave a dog to learn by his own devices but instead giving guidance, firm but fair and consistence with positive reinforcement and praise, as well as tenacious about good manners while giving him the social skills that a city dog will need. He was working on leash training and there is no doubt he would come along fine. He would be going to the dog park with my older dog 14 days after his last shots to continue his socialization and would have been a go everywhere meet everyone kind of dog in the same mold as my current Heeler.

I placed an ad to rehome the puppy. I had many many inquires. I picked the best home for this puppy even though I had faster offers. I had to wait until the preferred owners could meet with me on their schedule not mine. If I was just looking to “dump” the dog any number of people wanted him. Instead, I VERY carefully and methologically screened the potential owners and some of the potentials where rather incensed at my level of interrogation. I would have only rehomed this puppy to an owner who could offer the same quality of life and love and I would not rehome the puppy until I found the right home by my standards. I would have kept the puppy regardless of my situation rather than rehome him to a place that I was unsure he would not get the highest quality of life possible, be that city or in the country. I was not shopping for environment but responsible owners. In the end I got him a country life with dedicated animal lovers and rather than just being a country dog isolated from humans.. You may call that what you will, but I call it being responsible and living up to my commitment. It was a diffsuct decison on me because this dog had been hand picked by me based exclusively on personalities traits of parents, and other litter mates but the right one for all concerned in the end. In spite of my best efforts it was not the right situation. It was however the right puppy.

I will not respond further to this idea that a dog raised in the city has a lesser equity of life than a dog in the country and this is regardless of this breed. I will not subscribe to the notion that any breed is absolute in their needs wants and desires and that tendencies cannot be altered even with generic disposition and that the environment is the only criteria for a mentally healthy dog.. All Dogs need love, care, guidance, and a bonding relationship along with an interesting life and this is not mutually exclusive to whether I were Cowboy boots or a high shine on my dress shoes and you will never EVER convince me otherwise.

I know who I am, what I give, you do not and are not in the position to judge. Only morons judge without the facts. Enough said.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Hey Willow,

Thanks for your support. I've started to rethink this a bit now and have been looking at other dogs using much of the same criteria. Medium to low activity, people orientated and a will to please, bright eyes with expressions and responsive but not hyper.

There seems to be some thinking this puppy was a "tool" and that was never the case. I spent waaaay too much time selecting this dog for just a tool. This puppy was to be my dog until his last days. I'm guessing I looked at about 100 dogs and puppies before selecting this pup. I knew what I was looking for and have never rehomed any animal until this one. I don't settle for just any dog because for me, a dog is forever. I go through girlfriends faster than dogs so I pick very carefully. :) This was an exceptional pup and I knew it after I spent 2 hours with this pup BEFORE I adopted it.

I have some feelers out and am going back to shelters. I would rather rescue than buy from an individual and I'm thinking now about a 6 month to a year dog might be better. More than likely a spayed female this time as my male has an Alpha streak.

I'm not looking for a specific breed this time, but one under 50 lbs. I don't do "stupid" things very well in people or dogs and I can't do one of those fluffy chick yappy dogs either. That doesn't narrow it down much but it helps I think to know what I don't want and what won't fit in my current circumstances.
 

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With your dog terminally ill I just don't understand why you got a puppy. Yeah I know what you said, but it wasn't a great idea! Your older dog needs peace and quiet.

As for the puppy going to a petting zoo, IMO this will be a life of hell for him. I feel so bad for this pup, you should have returned him to the breeder, or at least took the time to find a better home.
 

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Hi Pat,

I understand the concern about both. I did not get the sense from the adoptive family that this was some kind of caged animal show but instead a very controlled situation where the puppy could interact with some children. I could be wrong because I will not be there, but that is my estimation based on the conversation. I didn't get the sense there was anything exploitative with any of their animals. They seemed like kind and gentle people to me.

One thing I did notice, when she picked him up and held him, the puppy went to licking her face and her hands like I have never seen. He was calm in her arms and seemingly VERY comfortable. If dogs sense human energy he was liking her more than me. I had not seen that reaction from him which made me think she was a kind and caring animal person and he knew it. I agree it sounds bad, but if you met the people and saw his reaction, that may be information for further consideration. Make no mistake about this, I loved this puppy and my goal was a forever home with me.

I selected this puppy because he wanted to be with people more than other dogs. I think I have said, he would leave his food bowl to follow me around the house. He seemed to enjoy being touched and I made a point to massage the little guy in t-touch circles and encouraged everyone I came across to "pet the puppy." I think puppy's need trust to people. I make a point to hold their feet, ears, force them to relax while I rub their tummy. In my mind this is a critical part of building trust with humans and makes Vet visits much easier. My older Blue is so de-sensitized on petting he's bored with it and goes along with the program most of the time. Because of this puppies need to be with people, I felt getting affection from children/strangers was a benefit. That was my thought process anyway.

I could not take him back to the breeder and would not have even if I could. The breeder did not ask me even one question, where the puppy was going or if I had had any experience with Heelers. He didn't care it seemed as long as I had the money. He sold two other puppies when I was there. He didn't ask anything of anyone which made me think he didn't necessarily have the best dog/best owner match in mind. There would have been no telling where this pup would have ended up if I took him back. I felt I could find him a better home than the breeder and still think I did. The new owner told me to call anytime or come by and see the pup which gave me some assurance that they were going to take very good care of him. They were not getting this puppy to be in the petting zoo, he would be a house/farm dog first and foremost and go with them when they traveled with the petting zoo. I won't defend my position on this anymore, but there were extenuating circumstances along with my own gut feelings plus an interview, an observations than brought me to this decision. I guess you would have to have been there. I still believe he got a great home and certainly better than what he might have and going back to that breeder.

On the Cancer. He has good days and bad days. More good than bad since his surgery. He's a pretty laid back dog anyway, while we don't play ball with the same intensity we used to, he is still active, runs up and down the stairs, takes long walks and is eating well. The color of his tongue and gums is pretty good which is barometer for red blood cell count. He may have this insidious cancer trying to grow in him but because he is in perfect weight, health and general muscle condition otherwise no-one knows when his time will come.

He's actually gaining weight on his new diet and the vet said we will have to watch that if it becomes out of hand. He's slower sometimes which I attribute to the cancer which may or not be the case. At almost 9, he's out of his puppy stage at any rate and into his golden years at age 52.

Some dogs succumb in weeks to this, some last months and some have lasted up to 4 years. Because I have him on a specialized diet there is a chance he will have more time than less. As long as he is active, bright eyed, interested in life, I 'll keep doing what I'm doing and loving him all the way. .

I just cooked his breakfast, medium rare hamburger and he licked his plate clean and ready to go for his walk. There are some experts who believe healthy activity is good for the Cancer patient and in any case, he likes it so I will provide mental and physical stimulation until he cannot continue or doesn't show interest in either. He liked the puppy but didn't like the puppy coming from the back. He's always been like this, he prefers to be the "humper" not the "humpee" and that does not matter if it is puppy or an old grayed dog.

If I add a friend to our pack, that dog needs to take no for an answer when trying to hump him or there will be trouble. He's no different at the dog park either, meet nose to nose it's all good. Try to mount him and there will be trouble. He's always been like this and most likely will not change. He has been neutered since he was 6 months old so It's not a breeding thing but a Alpha thing. If I do add another dog, this time is will be a spayed female and old enough to have some brain power and social skills.
 

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On the Cancer. He has good days and bad days. More good than bad since his surgery. He's a pretty laid back dog anyway, while we don't play ball with the same intensity we used to, he is still active, runs up and down the stairs, takes long walks and is eating well. The color of his tongue and gums is pretty good which is barometer for red blood cell count. He may have this insidious cancer trying to grow in him but because he is in perfect weight, health and general muscle condition otherwise no-one knows when his time will come.

He's actually gaining weight on his new diet and the vet said we will have to watch that if it becomes out of hand. He's slower sometimes which I attribute to the cancer which may or not be the case. At almost 9, he's out of his puppy stage at any rate and into his golden years at age 52.

Some dogs succumb in weeks to this, some last months and some have lasted up to 4 years. Because I have him on a specialized diet there is a chance he will have more time than less. As long as he is active, bright eyed, interested in life, I 'll keep doing what I'm doing and loving him all the way. .

I just cooked his breakfast, medium rare hamburger and he licked his plate clean and ready to go for his walk. There are some experts who believe healthy activity is good for the Cancer patient and in any case, he likes it so I will provide mental and physical stimulation until he cannot continue or doesn't show interest in either. He liked the puppy but didn't like the puppy coming from the back. He's always been like this, he prefers to be the "humper" not the "humpee" and that does not matter if it is puppy or an old grayed dog.
I am really hopeful the special diet will give you and your dog more time. Is he also getting treatment, chemo and or radiaiton? When I had my dog in treatment for cancer I found the following site http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/CanineCancer/ The people there are very knowledgeable (no vets) about cancer, diets and supplements. I'm sure they will be most helpful to you.

Sending lots of good thoughts and wishing you both the best. :)

p.s. What is your dogs name? I think I must have missed it.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
His name is Cowboy.

I wish this Cancer would respond to Chemo but it does not. Some Cancers do well and go into remission, but this type of Sarcoma is not one of them. Cowboy has a blood cancer and tries to build it's own blood cell network It's terminal and from everything I had read, nothing can be done. All a diet can do is postpone the outcome.

Because it was in his spleen and his spleen was bleeding, this introduced the cancerous blood cells to other parts of his body. What organ it will attack next is anyones guess but mostly likely the heart, Kidney or liver. A blood transfusion is only a stop gap measure and will not help long term.

Cancers need sugars and carbs to grow so all those have been excluded from his diet. He eats a lot of liver for building red blood cells along with fresh green veggies as well as other high fat meats like hamburger and beef organs like heart and kidney. He also eats Hills Canine ND which is a RX cancer dog food. My kitchen counter is covered in supplements that are added to his diet. Too many to list here, but he receives fish oil, ip-6, Ezyme, spirolina and a healthy dose of vitamin C to help absorbing the supplements just to name a few. My canine cancer vet has his own mix of supplements I add as well. This is all I can do or trust me, I would be doing it. The vet bills to date are approaching $3000.00 for something that cannot be cured. The next time he is critical will be the last time so I try enjoy everyday with him more than the last and give him the highest quality of life in his remaining days.

I have discussed with the Vets about putting him down the most humane way possible. As heart wrenching as that is, I need to understand the options and make the right decisions here. I have joined a pet loss support forum to give me some support. While I'm not ready to give up until he is in pain or is incapable of a quality life, I am trying to get prepared as much as someone can for this. I live alone, it it just Cowboy and I.

When he does go, I can know that I did everything humanly possible and more than many people would. I can take some pride in that piece but he can never be replaced and I am coming to grips with that.

The goal of adding a new dog now is two-fold. First to add some interest in his life and a perhaps a will to live and second to ease my transition when he passes. There are two schools of thought on this and have to pick the right one for Cowboy and myself. I have thought through his needs and my needs and trying to find a compromise. That's why the puppy was adopted and what started this thread in the first place. That didn't work out of course because I introduced the wrong age dog.

I still believe adding a dog at this time would be an asset to all, but it must be the right dog for both of us given the situation. I may be wrong again, but that will not stop me from trying to do this best thing for all. At some point, I will have to move on but that day is not today and until that day, I will try to keep both of us mentally upbeat and as happy as "we" can be given the prognosis. I would do no less for a human child, and I will continue to take the same approch for Cowboy.
 
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