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Discussion Starter #1
I have a blue Great Dane and I am really struggling with his skin. I have taken him to the vet many times...they have done skin scrapings and blood work and all they come back with is that he has a lot of bacteria on his skin. He breaks out in sores all over his body and the only treatment that the Dr has been able to come up with is to use the antibiotic Cipro. Unfortunately we have to keep putting him on the antibiotic to clear up the sores (see pics) and he keeps needing more and more of the antibiotic as he builds up a resistance to it.

We feed him Diamond grain free food (We alternate the chicken, beef and fish)

If anyone has any advice I would love to know. Thank you
 

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not a vet when I was dealing with chronic conditions *yeasty ears) it was an autoimmune response.. So that would be an area to search, find facebook groups or forum groups. in general bacteria lives on all of us and our natural immune system protects us from it. When I was looking for food.. I had to find a protein that they had never been exposed to before.... Chicken and beef, grain, dairy, eggs, chicken fat were triggers for them. simple limited ingredients were helpful to see any results if it was helping was about 60 days.. it was a quick response if they ate something that was not right for them.. their ear lining would turn read and have a bad episode of the ears and that took time to run it's course and be on the mend. Nothing is instant. and even in healing, they would still have episoides but they were milder, and shorter and further apart to know I was on the right track Trying to think of a tittle of a specialty vet that you could talk to. And if you have a vet college in your state you could send your medical records to them and get advice of any test they would want to see and your vet could do the test if you can't travel to them. I know how frustrating it can be... first is to try to find out what aggravates the situation and stop the aggravation so the body can rest , restore and try to heal its self. The other is the predisone approach which shuts the body down completely immune wise, gives the body a chance to stop reacting, rest recover.. get rid of the inflamation in the body from the reactions, in hopes that when your dog is weaned off the predisone the body will have reset to normal function... that is something to talk to a vet that deals with auto immune situations as you must monitor your dogs organs on predisone because it can damage them.. Find the right vets to work with. Hugs...
 

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Thank you for responses, we did have him checked for allergies and there were some mild ones but according to the Vet...nothing that should have caused the skin issues that we are seeing. That is why the Vet ordered the skin scraping, biopsy of the sores and had them sent off to a specialist. It was extremely frustrating because I was hoping to get answers back after the test.

Just a question, do you think that skin issues are diet related? What would be your suggestion on how to proceed with changing his diet? I have been thinking of trying a BARF diet or a cooked food diet instead of kibble. Only problem with those diets, is he eats so much that it will get really pricey
 

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Have you considered getting a second opinion, maybe with a vet that has greater knowledge of skin issues? Not that your vet is bad or anything, but sometimes different people with a fresh perspective can think of something else.

Yes, skin issues can be diet related. First, have you noticed a difference in the intensity of the skin issues on different foods? I noticed you switched from chicken, then beef then fish and alternate between. You could try a protein you have never used before and see if that makes a difference.
 

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Blue Great Dane.

Sounds like color dilution alopecia is a strong contender. The symptoms can only be treated but perhaps going to a specialist familiar with the problem would be a good idea.
 

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@Kathyy, thank you for that information. After reading up on it, I think that is exactly what it is. I do not think that our Vet would have ever found because they would have had to order a genetic test.

Thank you for your help!
 

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Probably time to get a referral to a veterinary dermatologist or a vet school (if there is one within reasonable driving distance). Color Dilution Alopcecia typically results in a thin, brittle coat, not recurring skin infections.
 
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