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I am familiar with the adage: "I'm from the guvmint and I'm here to hep you."

Because of the Chinese dog food gluten scare, we researched our dog’s food and based on the rating and info on DogfoodAdvisor.com switched him to EVO Senior. EVO Senior(and related products made at the same plant) was recently recalled due to the FDA finding salmonella in one batch. So again based on reviews on DogfoodAdvisor.com we switched him to Orijen Senior. It’s made in Canada and I just discovered that during the mad cow disease, some of Champion Pet’s products may have used infected cows and were recalled. I do not know if Canadian dog food manufacturers are inspected similar to US ones. Whether a dog food is inspected or not is generally not disclosed. Does anyone know how good the Canadian inspection agency is? What’s a top rated dog food that is subject to a good independent inspection regime and preferably available off the shelf at PetCo, Pet Supplies Plus, or most vets or animal stores?
 

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I don't think USDA inspections are anything special :p.

Almost all of the larger companies claim to have their food independently tested/inspected/etc. You would have to contact the company directly to find out the details of that testing/inspecting.
 

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I am familiar with the adage: "I'm from the guvmint and I'm here to hep you."

Because of the Chinese dog food gluten scare, we researched our dog’s food and based on the rating and info on DogfoodAdvisor.com switched him to EVO Senior. EVO Senior(and related products made at the same plant) was recently recalled due to the FDA finding salmonella in one batch. So again based on reviews on DogfoodAdvisor.com we switched him to Orijen Senior. It’s made in Canada and I just discovered that during the mad cow disease, some of Champion Pet’s products may have used infected cows and were recalled. I do not know if Canadian dog food manufacturers are inspected similar to US ones. Whether a dog food is inspected or not is generally not disclosed. Does anyone know how good the Canadian inspection agency is? What’s a top rated dog food that is subject to a good independent inspection regime and preferably available off the shelf at PetCo, Pet Supplies Plus, or most vets or animal stores?
Virtually no rules like we have here. We could do much better, like Europe, but Canada is way, way behind. At least here pet foods are included in the Food and Cosmetics Act and FDA is very active when it comes to plant inspections. The FDA forced Natura into a nation-wide recall because 1 bag out the 1,000 they tested was positive. I would say the FDA is very tough. I don't know why people assume the USDA is involved so much with dog food plants. USDA regulates agricultural products not finished feed products. I am not saying that USDA is not involved but the laws governing pet food are enforced by the FDA. The ingredients are regulated more at the supplier level by USDA.

Don't stop there on Champion, there was a recall for sharp bones, then the big fiasco in Australia, then an importation ban due to Salmonella. There were also reports about Regional Red and some bad batches that were in the market. Just reports.

Ingredient quality of the more common items is also much lower in Canada, that is why many Canadian companies use ingredients from the US and Europe.
 

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I agree that most government agencies are useless except at harassing businesses and people (unless they are big campaign donors), but in this case amazingly that would work for my benefit. As for independent firms hired by dog food manufacturers the lab is in a conflict of interest as they are paid by the company they are testing and need them to continue their contract so they may well temper the disclosure of their results.

I am saddened to hear that the Canadian government inspection regime lags way behind. I guess there is no good solution, but of those available, dog food manufacturers monitored by the FDA seems to be the best.

At first I admired EVO for recalling all their products, but I am now learning that the initial problem was discovered in November 2012 and they did not initially recall all products. I only learned of the recall in June 2013.
 

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I do not remember which pet food it was that was taken off the shelves... It was taken off the shelves way too damn late, only reason anyone looked into it is because dogs were sick and dying left and right. When people complain, THEN someone checks in on it. Kind of sucks.
 

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Many pet foods have been taken off the shelves. if you want to get notice of recalls, sign up at www.dogfoodadvisor.com

But that only works if the manufacturer, or I suppose the FDA issues a recall. It does no good if a problem is detected by the manufacturer or their contracted independent lab but not disclosed or acted upon.
 

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It's not the FDA that governs pet food; it's the USDA. Because pets are technically livestock :/.

If you want to give your pet food that is regulated by the FDA, you could provide a homemade diet made of human-grade ingredients. It takes some research to make sure all the proper nutrients are being provided, but at least you'd have full control over the ingredients. Not that the FDA is soooo much better than the USDA but at leasy there's a little improvement :p.
 

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Here's what the FDA has to say about their role in regulating pet foods

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates that can of cat food, bag of dog food, or box of dog treats or snacks in your pantry. The FDA’s regulation of pet food is similar to that for other animal foods. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA) requires that all animal foods, like human foods, be safe to eat, produced under sanitary conditions, contain no harmful substances, and be truthfully labeled. In addition, canned pet foods must be processed in conformance with the low acid canned food regulations to ensure the pet food is free of viable microorganisms, see Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 113 (21 CFR 113).
FDA Regulation of Pet Food

There is no requirement that pet food products have pre-market approval by the FDA. However, FDA ensures that the ingredients used in pet food are safe and have an appropriate function in the pet food. Many ingredients such as meat, poultry and grains are considered safe and do not require pre-market approval. Other substances such as sources of minerals, vitamins or other nutrients, flavorings, preservatives, or processing aids may be generally recognized as safe (GRAS) for an intended use (21 CFR 582 and 584) or must have approval as food additives (21 CFR 570, 571 and 573). Colorings must have approvals for that use as specified in 21 CFR 70 and be listed in Parts 73, 74, or 81. For more information about pet foods and marketing a pet food, see FDA’s Regulation of Pet Food and Information on Marketing a Pet Food Product.
Whereas the USDA would regulate a lot of the sources of the ingredients and would regulate imported products to a degree
 

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Ah, thanks for that! I'm used to looking at the USDA handbook for definitions for ingredients, etc. so I thought they handled all of it.
 

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They have a zero tolerance policy from my understand, which is pretty darn stupid. It has meat in it. Of course it has bacteria and salmonella.

http://truthaboutpetfood2.com/a-regulatory-rant
Now enter raw pet food; held to a different regulatory standard. Raw pet food is a ‘finished/ready to eat food’ – though it is still raw meat. Because it is a ready to eat food, it now falls into FDA’s scope of control. The FDA can swarm in with their Salmonella test kits swabbing the floor, the walls, and everything in-between for Salmonella in a raw pet food manufacturing facility. But not a grocery meat department. That’s off limits – it’s USDA’s control. It does not seem to matter that the entire meat section in your local grocery could be full of bacteria.
Somehow, regulatory authorities feel consumers know how to properly handle raw meat for human consumption, but pet food consumers aren’t intelligent enough to do the same with raw meat pet food.
The very same product – raw meat – in a grocery store, is not held to the same standard that raw meat pet food is held to. No regulatory authority swarms the grocery meat department with their Salmonella test kits. No regulatory authority swarms a poultry processing facility with their Salmonella test kits.
 

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It's not the FDA that governs pet food; it's the USDA. Because pets are technically livestock :/.

If you want to give your pet food that is regulated by the FDA, you could provide a homemade diet made of human-grade ingredients. It takes some research to make sure all the proper nutrients are being provided, but at least you'd have full control over the ingredients. Not that the FDA is soooo much better than the USDA but at leasy there's a little improvement :p.
you are wrong
 

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Here's what the FDA has to say about their role in regulating pet foods



Whereas the USDA would regulate a lot of the sources of the ingredients and would regulate imported products to a degree
Any product that is imported goes through USDA/Aphis & FSIS, even finished food products. Some products don't require an importation permit but that is decided by USDA/Aphis & FSIS. The Border Patrol and Customs people get involved too.

Petfood companies are registered under FDA as required under the Food and Cosmetics Act. The FDA will often defer to AAFCO for ingredient allowances but some states get involved too. For example, some states don't allow supplemental glucosamine & chondroitin in foods even though the supplements are technically GRAS.
 
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