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Discussion Starter #1
I was scrolling through Facebook today and found this website that claims to educate the public about ethical and responsible breeders, especially the difference between disreputable breeders and reputable breeders. It's called "Good Dog". It appears to be geared more toward the breeders having a place to advertise themselves and connect them with potential buyers for their pups, but they also say they "rate" breeders by merits such as titling their dogs, getting health tests, etc. So if a breeder titles, gets all recommended health tests for their breeds, promises to take dogs back if a problem arises, for example, they would get an "Excellent" badge.

I think this is a pretty neat idea. I hope it works out and steers some people away from disreputable breeders. I seems free for buyers to use, but I'm sure there is a fee or something for breeders to get a "Good Breeder" certificate.

What do you guys think?
 

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I took a look at the website... One of the "Ausidoodle" breeders listed on the website currently has three litters on the ground. On the other hand, I recognize some of the Doberman breeders listed, and they are considered reputable.
 

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I took a look at the website... One of the "Ausidoodle" breeders listed on the website currently has three litters on the ground. On the other hand, I recognize some of the Doberman breeders listed, and they are considered reputable.
Did you happen to notice what type of badge the "Ausidoodle" breeder got? If they health test? I tried searching but nothing came up for Ausidoodles, even when I changed the spelling.

I looked at Australian Shepherds just to see the difference between breeders. I saw one who clearly titles, health tests, and does all the things reputable breeders are supposed to do, and I also saw a few that I'm not sure if they title or not (one of them was also the most expensive puppies!), but they do health test. Health testing seems to be a major part of earning an excellent badge, but I'm really curious what else goes into that. Here are their key screening aspects:
  1. Breeding practices
  2. Physical health of the breeding dogs and puppies
  3. Mental health of the breeding dogs and puppies
  4. Environment
  5. Buyer education and policies
So I'm guessing they have to pass this in order to even be on the site?

I did also find an Aussie breeder that did not appear to have a badge. She only did genetic testing, no hips or elbows.

When you look at a specific breed page, there is a menu at the top that has the options "Location, Availability, Transportation, and Health Testing". When you click on Health Testing, a menu drops down that as Levels 1-3, 3 being the most excellent which "exceeds health testing requirements for the breed". It kind of looks being level 3 is how they get that excellent badge.

I wish they rated breeders on more than just health testing and really displayed that information for potential buyers to compare and contrast against other breeders, but I also feel like a breeder who spends all that money health testing is likely doing a lot more with their dogs most of the time.

I also like that that people can see that one breeder is doing more than recommended health tests for their breed and their puppies are $, and another breeder is level one and does the bare minimum but their puppies are $$$. I hope it gets people to think about what they're actually paying for!

There's a few things I think they could tweak, but overall, a step in the right direction and great starter source for anyone beginning the search for a reputable breeder.
 

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I don't even remember which one it was. I just selected them at random.

Health testing is important, but I find that a lot of the people only do enough to impress someone who doesn't really understand what it's all about. For example, a lot of crummy Doberman breeders will do the two available tests for Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and advertise their dogs as "clear" for DCM, without also doing the annual holters and ultrasounds that are so far the only halfway accurate tests for DCM.

Titling is important to me, as well. Preferable titles on both ends. Conformation titles prove that the dogs have the proper build and breed type. Performance titles prove that they can do ore than just look pretty.

Another important thing to consider is time. If someone has three litters on the ground at the same time, that is a LOT of work to properly socialize and expose the puppies to things, especially if they are larger litters. Even if they only plan for one litter at a time, if they are producing 10-12 litters a year, that is still non-stop work. Also, lifetime support... what if you can't keep your dog? Will they take it back?

There are people who are AKC Breeder of Merit or AKC Bred with HEART certified who I wouldn't buy from, nor recommend to anyone. There is at least one breeder on the DPCA referral that I wouldn't touch with a 10 foot pole.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah, there certainly is likely never to be a single place anybody could go and know 100% that they only have reputable breeders. You still have to do your own research, but I think many people who simply don't know any better will benefit from a site that helps them understand what they should be looking for/not looking for!

I hope that this website really reaches out to/attracts the general public. I think the AKC does an okay job reaching out to "doggy dog" people who are involved in AKC events, but it might intimidate others because they "don't need a show dog." I don't see much on this Good Dog website about the importance of titling or simply showing that your breeding stock are more than "Yayayay, male + female = puppies", though. This is there article on "What does a reputable breeder look like?"

I also scrolled through their list of dog breeds and found lots of "doodle" breeders. I'm not crazy about that, but I think someone who wants a doodle for whatever reason is going to get a doodle...at least this site requires that they at least do "Good" health testing. There were actually 7 pages of Goldendoodle breeders who met the "Excellent" health testing requirement. I was surprised. Most doodles where also incredibly expensive, usually over $2,500! Not to be a doodle hater, I am just usually not at all impressed with doodle breeders and their ethics, so it's nice to see that some are striving for something!

Also, lifetime support... what if you can't keep your dog? Will they take it back?
I'm pretty sure it's one of the requirements to be part of the "Good Breeder Community". It's here.
 

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I think they have a good vision.

I know some may not agree with "doodles" and what have you.. but people are going to get "doodles" and what have you. I actually kind of like that they don't care what you are breeding, so much as HOW you are breeding. Right now because they are new, they may even be more lenient. As time goes on.. who knows. I'm reserving judgement for now.
 

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I think they have a good vision.

I know some may not agree with "doodles" and what have you.. but people are going to get "doodles" and what have you. I actually kind of like that they don't care what you are breeding, so much as HOW you are breeding. Right now because they are new, they may even be more lenient. As time goes on.. who knows. I'm reserving judgement for now.
I agree, if someone wants a doodle they will get a doodle. The site definitely does not cater to only breeders who breed dog breeds recognized by organizations like the AKC. Which, whatever. We have to get more breeds somehow, and the national kennel clubs are not the end all be all of dogs. At least the site is making people think about what is going into the pairing of their potential puppy's parents, as well as being able to compare different breeders and their goals (or lack thereof) in one place.
 

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I think its a good idea, I just hope people still know to look into the breeder themselves. Just because somebody does there sorts of things to earn them a high ranking badge, doesn't always make them the best breeders producing the best lines.
 

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I think its a good idea, I just hope people still know to look into the breeder themselves. Just because somebody does there sorts of things to earn them a high ranking badge, doesn't always make them the best breeders producing the best lines.
I applied just to see if it would assist me. Now in 2020 there are lots of breeders listed. No more actual visits to breeders-just a long phone interview re DNA testing in breeding dogs. The breeder I applied seemed pressured to respond initially, then nothing. From reading breeders comments, they do not like the DNA testing pressure from the site. So, another good idea that does not really deliver. If you read their by laws, one will see they are PRO breeders, not a site to protect consumers from bad breeders.
 

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My opinion, if you are breeding mutts..."doodles", etc... you are NOT a good breeder.
These dogs are not a breed, but because all mutts have "breed names", people think it's a new breed.
It takes MANY generations to set a breed. It's like people think mutts don't exist anymore.
With so many dogs dying for lack of homes, why would anyone think we need new breeds?
And keep in mind, most of these named mixes originated in puppy mills.
 
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