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I am deciding on whether to purchase a "medium" goldendoodle, bred with a 20 pound moyen poodle and a 60 pound golden retriever, or a standard, bred with a 55 pound poodle and a 50 pound golden retriever.
I have two young kids, so I don't want a huge dog, but I do want it to grow to a substantial size. However, most important to me is temperament. (My fear is that the smaller breed producing a yappier, more hyper dog) I want a great companion for my young children. Can anyone tell me of experience with a moyen bread goldendoodle compared to a standard? Or if anyone has insight with the sizes of what these litters may produce, I would greatly appreciate it!!
 

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Have you considered either a golden retriever OR a standard poodle? Finding a good poodle breeder for example will be easier than finding a good "doodle" breeder. You will have a far better idea of temperament, genetics, expected size, etc.

Being a mix of two breeds, even if the parent's sizes are known, there can be a wide range of sizes (and temperaments!) within a litter. The grandparents could have had much different sizes and temperaments. Since doodles are a "designer dog" and too many people see breeding them as a way to make a quick buck, they aren't testing for health issues (like hip dysplasia which is common in GRs) or matching temperament and physical traits between the male and the female to best compliment each other

Small does not equal yappy (training issue mostly) or hyper (temperament, exercise and training play a part).

As a general guide-- puppies will be in between the sizes of the parents. So 20 lbs bred to 60 lbs can produce puppies anywhere from 20 to 60 pounds although more likely somewhere near the midpoint. But if the father or mother of the 60 lbs dog was 80 lbs, then a pup could be larger than his mom.
 

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Have you considered either a golden retriever OR a standard poodle? Finding a good poodle breeder for example will be easier than finding a good "doodle" breeder. You will have a far better idea of temperament, genetics, expected size, etc.

Being a mix of two breeds, even if the parent's sizes are known, there can be a wide range of sizes (and temperaments!) within a litter. The grandparents could have had much different sizes and temperaments. Since doodles are a "designer dog" and too many people see breeding them as a way to make a quick buck, they aren't testing for health issues (like hip dysplasia which is common in GRs) or matching temperament and physical traits between the male and the female to best compliment each other

Small does not equal yappy (training issue mostly) or hyper (temperament, exercise and training play a part).

As a general guide-- puppies will be in between the sizes of the parents. So 20 lbs bred to 60 lbs can produce puppies anywhere from 20 to 60 pounds although more likely somewhere near the midpoint. But if the father or mother of the 60 lbs dog was 80 lbs, then a pup could be larger than his mom.
All of this ^^^ And if you are looking at doodles bred from moyen poodles in the US, know that moyen and klein are not recognized sizes in either AKC or UKC. If you want a healthy, temperamentally sound dog for your kids, you'll stack the deck in your favor by going to reputable breeder. You can also find lovely dogs at rescues and shelters - there are even doodle rescues who can match you with an appropriate dog.

Anecdotally, I've heard that with doodles, the puppies can often grow up to be larger than both parents.

I have a standard poodle. If you are interested in information about poodles or finding a reputable poodle breeder, I'm happy to share.
 

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First thought: Let the buyer beware
Why do you want a goldendoodle specifically? Yappy, hyper dogs are untrained, under-stimulated dogs. Poodles are not a magical breed that you can mix other breeds with to get shed free dogs. I would recommend you get an adult dog from a shelter so you know exactly what you're going to get in terms of size and temperament. Either that or get a purebred golden from a responsible breeder that health tests their breeding stock and cares about temperament. Again you'll know what you're getting. A lot of mixed breeds end up in the shelter because they aren't what people expect. Those BYBs will say anything to get your money. That money is better put investing in a quality dog that comes with a health guarantee, or in saving a shelter dog's life.

A relative of mine has two "goldendoodles" from two different BYBs and they look and act like entirely different dogs - because they're mixes and not a breed. Both her dogs are medium size, and one looks like a nova-scotia duck tolling retriever, sheds profusely, and has a temperament she doesn't like (needy needy needy!). The second looks more like what people think a goldendoodle should look like and is so lethargic I thought he was sick when I first met him.
This relative wanted a small "doodle" that had a curly no-shed coat. I kept telling her she wasn't going to get what she thought she was going to get, and to go to a shelter or a real breeder, but she didn't care. She paid about $2500 (!!!) for one of her puppies - that's more than some rare purebred dogs cost! She didn't even go meet the "breeder" in person, the puppy was shipped to her house sight unseen. That is an insane risk.

Second thought: Dogs are hard work
I'm concerned that you state you want this dog as a companion for the children. Dogs aren't toys, kids aren't responsible enough yet to take care of pets consistently, and puppies need as much attention as a child. When you first bring home a puppy it's like having a newborn - no one sleeps well, they cry, they can't hold their bladders, there's vet visits... There's a lot of ongoing training involved with a dog so that they can live peacefully and safely with the family.

Have you had a dog before? I'm hoping you have and realize the commitment needed. You're going to have to take care of your two young children (lots of work) and a dog (more work) and whatever other responsibilities you have. You should be getting a dog for you, first, then as a bonus the dog is a companion for the children. If you don't want a dog for you and don't want to be involved in the dog's training and life every day for the rest of its life, you are going to end up regretting getting a dog.

I'm not saying all this to be mean, I say it because I see too many young families (including neighbors I've had, and distant relatives in my own family!) get a dog because of the two kids and a dog fantasy, and/or for prestige reasons, and just turn the dog out in the backyard with no training whatsoever. Untrained dogs can hurt people, destroy your home, and bother neighbors. The dog gets blamed for being "bad" when they don't know any better. The families have no idea how to tackle behavioral issues in dogs and apply band-aid after band-aid (keeping the dog outside, in the garage, basement, getting a shock collar, muzzle, hitting the dog) until the dog is re-homed, brought to a shelter, or so depressed it doesn't do anything. I'm hoping you already know all this and can ignore this caveat emptor. Puppydogs aren't all sunshine and rainbows.
 

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I would like to add this: Goldendoodles are very expensive to own. They need regular grooming, and their fur, that combination of the thick golden coat with the poodle coat, is very difficult to groom. My groomer charges me $40 to groom my golden mix. She told me she charges a minimum of $75 for a goldendoodle his size (43 lbs) because of how incredibly difficult they are to groom. You'll need to pay for this every 6 weeks.

My dog, on the other hand, doesn't set off my brother-in-law's allergies, is great with kids, is really mellow and all around perfect family dog. I paid the rescue $250 and that included neutering and all shots. He came to me as an adult and there was no potty training, teething or general puppy madness.

I'm not saying you have to adopt, but if you want a golden mix (or a poodle mix), there are other, ethical, cheaper ways to go about it.
 
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