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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! I just wanted to post to ask if it is normal/okay that my goldendoodle puppy has droopy eyes that resemble the eyes of a hound. I didn’t think this was a trait found in poodles or golden retrievers but he has them. Is this an issue/defect or cause for concern? Or is it just a unique feature of my pup? I also noticed his legs are kinda short and he resembles a corgi. It’s very strange as I was told he is half poodle, half golden retriever.
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he might be part basset, who knows what doodle breeders are up to
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I
QUOTE="Shell, post: 5298372, member: 27081"]
What do the parent dogs look like?
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What do the parent dogs look like?
I never got to see the parents as I got him from a family who bought him from a breeder for $1900. They couldn’t take care of him any longer and said they only had him for about two weeks. I don’t see any reason they would lie as all I asked for when getting a puppy was a low to no shedding dog and he is definitely that. I plan on contacting the guy I got him from to see if he saw the parents or if he could get pictures of the parents from the breeder but until then I just wanted to make sure it didn’t indicate any health problems. I plan to take him to my vet soon just to make sure everything is okay but he was just there less than a week ago with His previous family so it’s not urgent.
 

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they might not of lied, because they didn't know. Doodles are designer dogs often bred for a quick dollar. I wouldn't be too suprised if your dog had some sort of condition, or wasn't actually lab x poodle.
 

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he looks like he has pretty normal dog eyes to me. "hound dog eyes" would not be a health concern anyways and I don't see signs of cherry eye.

Just looks like an average doodle to me
 

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He's cute! Him having legs on the shorter side isn't really a concern in my opinion. He's still growing. Probably just some good old genetic variation. I've seen some goldens have slightly shorter legs than standard.
 

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I'm not seeing any excessive drooping or signs of ectropion. Maybe just a touch more nictitating membrane (aka third eyelid) showing in the first picture. Have you had him to the vet?

He looks like a typical doodle to me, maybe with a Mini Poodle parent, instead of a SPoo?. Puppies go through wonky stages as they grow. Sometimes the are all body, sometimes they are all legs.
 
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they might not of lied, because they didn't know. Doodles are designer dogs often bred for a quick dollar. I wouldn't be too suprised if your dog had some sort of condition, or wasn't actually lab x poodle.
Clearly you dislike designer "breeds" or at least the people that breed them, but let's focus on the question at hand.

Also, I wouldn't expect a golden doodle to be a ":lab x poodle."
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm not seeing any excessive drooping or signs of ectropion. Maybe just a touch more nictitating membrane (aka third eyelid) showing in the first picture. Have you had him to the vet?

He looks like a typical doodle to me, maybe with a Mini Poodle parent, instead of a SPoo?. Puppies go through wonky stages as they grow. Sometimes the are all body, sometimes they are all legs.
Okay thanks for your response! I don’t think it looks extremely droopy either, just more so than any other goldendoodle/poodle/golden retriever I’ve seen before. He apparently is a medium breed not a standard, estimated to be 45-50 pounds but I’m not so sure I fully believed this as he is already 25 pounds at 15 weeks old. Perhaps he truly is and just happened to get the larger genes as I know there is a lot of variation with mixed breeds. I also always take estimated weight with a grain of salt as both of my other standard doodles’ estimated weights were way off. My 108 pound boy was estimated 35-40 pounds and my 48 pound girl was estimated 65-75 pounds. He will be going to the vet soon but was just there with his previous family 5 days ago so I don’t feel extremely anxious to take him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Clearly you dislike designer "breeds" or at least the people that breed them, but let's focus on the question at hand.

Also, I wouldn't expect a golden doodle to be a ":lab x poodle."
Yes I’ve seen all the hate around doodle breeds on here and I completely understand it and expected some even on this post. I personally have 3 now with this puppy but I wasn’t specifically looking for goldendoodles when getting them. They just all were what I was looking for and all happened to be goldendoodles. I actually wanted a standard poodle the last two times I was looking but these babies stole my heart. What’s even crazier is that they’re all completely unintentionally cream.
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Unusual features can pop up when crossing dissimilar breeds. Also, some sketchy breeders aren't breeding what they say they are or are passing off "oops" litters as "designer." That said, at least in the pic, his eyes look pretty poodly to me. Also, he's adorable.

Personally, I wouldn't typically support a doodle breeder by paying them for a pup, but there's nothing wrong with getting a rehomed or rescued doodle...They're perfectly nice dogs and they need homes, too :)
 

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While well-bred poodles of all sizes should be very square dogs, many of the minis and toys that come out of lines that aren't carefully bred to standard are long-bodied. Some pretty extremely so. It's fairly common to find a poodle out of a mill or commercial breeding situation that looks weirdly short-legged and unbalanced (for the breed) because of this, so I'd guess your boy just has some of that going on rather than being mixed with a genuine low-rider. Dogs like corgis, dachshunds, bassets, etc. have a form of dwarfism that's very distinctive and tends to be inherited very strongly in at least the first couple generations of cross breeding - that's not what looks like is going on here to me.

I'd guess the eyes are the same stories. Many foundation dogs for doodles aren't going to be excellent examples of their breed, since most people breeding very high quality purebreds don't want their dogs ending up in a breeding program for crossbreeds. While a looser eye like you've shown isn't something you see in 'ideal' examples of either breed, you can probably find some goldens or even poodles with looser skin around the face and eyes that can cause that. Regardless, it doesn't look anywhere near extreme enough to cause issues!

You won't know for sure unless you do a reliable DNA test, of course. My oldest boy has a similar story - I got him as a puppy from someone who bought him from a commercial doodle breeder. He's supposed to be all poodle, which he looks and acts the part enough for that to be the case, but he also has some physical traits that could either be because he wasn't bred to the poodle breed standard, or because he has cocker or something a couple generations back. Some day when we have a second income I might splurge on the Embark test to see which is the case!

For the record, I'm not at all against crossbreeding or outcrossing purebred dogs, nor am I against breeding dogs 'just' for being good pets/companions (that's a purpose too, and a very in-demand one in today's society). I just feel strongly that we should hold those breeding programs to the same standards that we hold a purebred breeder. No, there won't be a written standard for how the dog should look, but they can still be performing thorough testing for genetic health problems on the parents, having a clear goal for the temperament they're trying to produce, tracking lines for patterns in health and behavior, and 'proving' their breeding stock by showing they're successful in sports or work like being therapy animals. I hope to see the 'designer' dogs move more in this direction as people become increasingly aware of what a good breeder can do to improve the chances of getting a healthy, long-lived dog with a stable temperament.
 

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For the record, I'm not at all against crossbreeding or outcrossing purebred dogs, nor am I against breeding dogs 'just' for being good pets/companions (that's a purpose too, and a very in-demand one in today's society). I just feel strongly that we should hold those breeding programs to the same standards that we hold a purebred breeder. No, there won't be a written standard for how the dog should look, but they can still be performing thorough testing for genetic health problems on the parents, having a clear goal for the temperament they're trying to produce, tracking lines for patterns in health and behavior, and 'proving' their breeding stock by showing they're successful in sports or work like being therapy animals. I hope to see the 'designer' dogs move more in this direction as people become increasingly aware of what a good breeder can do to improve the chances of getting a healthy, long-lived dog with a stable temperament.
Just to touch on this part of your post, while I'm against breeding mixed breeds willy-nilly, I'd like to see the AKC waive their requirement that PAL and Canine Partners dogs be altered, so that breeders have more chances to title their mixed breed breeding stock. Designer crosses aren't going to go away, so improving the temperament and health of them is something that conscientious breeders strive for. Also, it would give out-cross dogs the opportunity to be titled before being used in a breeding program. The UKC waived that requirement about six years ago, but there aren't nearly as many UKC evens as there are AKC events (in normal times, at least). Sadly, given the fighting that took place over allowing altered mixed breeds to compete, I don't see that happening any time soon.
 

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@LeoRose I'm in total agreement with you there. I'm honestly worried about the future of purebred dogs if breed books stay as staunchly closed as they are now, with even projects like the LUA Dalmatians that are 100% about improving the health of the breed drawing controversy and scorn. I'm definitely a proponent for changing the way the dog community in general (and especially the purebred dog community) sees mixed breeds, and that encouraging responsible breeding practices in all breeders can only benefit everyone.
 

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Hmm... they might not be as tight as they could be, but again, I'm not seeing anything really excessive. I would just keep an eye on it (no pun intended) as he grows.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Hmm... they might not be as tight as they could be, but again, I'm not seeing anything really excessive. I would just keep an eye on it (no pun intended) as he grows.
Okay thanks for the info! They don’t always look as obvious as they do in that photo but you can always see them. Actually you can always see them in my oldest goldendoodle but his are clear where the new puppies are brown, so they’re more noticeable. My middle girl you can never see them even when she just wakes up
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
What do the parent dogs look like?
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Here are his parents. It’s hard to see their eyes in the photo but at least I know he is in fact a goldendoodle. His mom (black poodle) may have the visible third eyelid but it’s so hard to tell. The parents are both very cute though.
 

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Ah, so he's definitely more poodle than golden! I still think that his eyes look like they're just a normal variation of 'tightness'. Maybe not one you see often in either breed, but probably not dangerous either. You can always bring it up at your next vet visit for a professional's opinion, but unless the third eyelid or eye whites seem red and inflamed I wouldn't assume this a medical issue on its own.
 
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