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We have a 1 year old male golden who, when calm, is affectionate and sweet. However, whenever he gets excited, his personality changes completely. If I am outside and he starts frapping (zoomies), he will usually lunge at me, bite me, growl, snarl, and bark. In order to protect myself, I have to pin him to the ground. Whenever we play inside, he also bites, but not severely. We have tried almost everything we can think of, but nothing seems to help. He is very smart and learns commands quickly, but these problems are not going away. We do not think he is scared/nervous, because we can take away food/bones from him easily.
Any ideas?
 

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He may be regarding the pinning as part of the game (wrestling, yay!). Just leave. Go inside, out of the yard, whatever. Game's over if he gets too rough. For a dog who enjoys your company, that should make the most difference.
 

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I dunno, maybe backing away would work? At any rate, I'm pretty sure anything physical you do will be seen as part of the fun. The good news is, he'll outgrow it someday. Young retrievers are insane :D.
 

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Have you done any bite inhibition work?

It also sound like he needs more mental tiring. Bob (1yo) gets like this sometimes, and it is always my cue to teach him a new trick. (the lastest- jumping over a hurdle. He LOVES it and does it for fun if I leave it set up.)
 

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I know only a little, but there is a sticky here . there's a regular poster, HankSimon, who has this bite inhibition training down. You might search for his name.
What types of bite inhibition would you suggest?
 

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Did I hear my name? :)

Read the Sticky that titiaamor pointed to. It works well with retrievers. Labs can be a pain :) but Goldens are usually so soft that if you look at them sternly, they melt. I've never herd the term 'Frapping' ? But I recognize the behavior in my Lab mix.

The problem is that your Golden has learned to play roughly, so it's time to communicate that he's too rough. It can take most puppies 3 days or more to get it, but your Golden may get it immediately, if you get his attention. The key is to Yelp, or say Ouch, or Oops loudly enough to get him to startle when he nips you, and every time afterwards. When he stops, and comes to lick you or does a playbow or barks at you, praise/reward him... and expect him to nip again. The way I look at it, is that the first time, he thinks it is just a passing injury, and with consistent repetition, he learns that you're just too soft to nibble on.

I wrote the following for someone else, but the advice still holds.... let us know:

The Bite Stops Here takes about 3 days to kick in, even then you only get a reduction of bloodletting, slowly resulting in bloodfree nipping, leading to mouthing, etc. Depending on the reaction of the pup, you don't have to use a Yelp!, you can say Ouch!!!, or Oops, where you want a marking word, to indicate when you are withdrawing attention.

Re-read the Sticky:the Bite Stops Here. perhaps you need to try a little longer. Read this and note the 3 days and the apology....maybe, he ignored the Yelp!, because you ignored the apology. Instead of the Yelp, you can say Ouch! or Oops!

Some Tweaks to Bite Inhibition (to get him to stop biting when he wants to play or otherwise):
1. When the pup bites, then yelp. It should sound about like what the pup does when you step on its paw... don't step on his paw for a sample :). When you yelp, the pup should startle briefly and stop nipping. (Look for the startle) Praise and pet. He'll bite.
2. When he bites the second time, Yelp. When he stops, praise and pet. He'll nip again, although it may be a little gentler. ...
3. Whenshe bites a third time, Yelp (see a pattern?). But this time, turn your back for 15 - 30 secs. If he comes around and play bows or barks, then that is an apology. This is important. Accept it, praise and pet... and cringe in expectation of the next nip...
4. When he bites the 4th time, Yelp, then leave the area, placing him in a 2 min. time-out. It is better if you can leave, rather than moving him. Then, return and interact. (He's still hungry...)
5. When he nips the fifth time, yelp, and leave the area, stopping interaction for now.

You can modify the number of steps, but not what you do... for example, you can leave in a huff :), after the second nip or even the first, but you have to provide a vocal marker, to give him something to react to. I still use a light yelp with my 11 yo when he lets teeth touch skin as I give him a treat. No pressure or harm, but I want him to appear very safe to everyone.

Pups need to sleep over night in order to learn their lessons. So, keep doing this for 3 days. By the third day, you should notice signficant Bite Inhibition. He may still nip, but it will be softer and he won't draw blood. And, he should be less aggressive, especially, if you notice the apology. Keep up the training and make sure that everyone yelps.... Very powerful method.

If you learn the technique, then you can apply the "yelp" to other circumstances, also. I believe that "yelp" is "Please don't do that, I don't like it." in dog communication. I currently use the yelp when my dog plays tug, then runs with the toy, when he fetches and keeps it out of reach or when he takes a treat too quickly....
 

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FRAP = Frenetic Random Activity Pattern ;)

That's what my family has always called zoomies. I think I saw the term in a training book.
 

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At first I was like "really, you dog can do that without thumbs?" then I noticed the 'r'......:whistle:
Ahahahah.

Me too.
 
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