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So I have a giant puppy, we have no idea what she is but probably 50% horse. She is absolutly nuts, just a regular puppy but on steroids. She is 8 (almost 9) months and 85 lbs at her last vet visit. She has most likey gained a few pounds since than. My main problem is her pulling. With the collar its like being pulled by a freight train, so I got a gentle leader. I have one for my pit mix and she heels almost perfectly with it and I can walk her with one hand. We've only had the gentle leader for a few days but Abby (the puppy) just sort of pulls through it. Much more managable than before but it slides up into her eye a bit from how much she pulls and her head is at a weird angle from the force she puts into it. Should I continue training with the gentle leader or try something else? This is my first time having such a large puppy, the other two are 12 and 40ish lbs.
 

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I'd be concerned about possible neck injuries if she's bulling that hard on a head collar. Have you tried a front clip harness?

Also, I'm going to recommend an online self study course about a method of teaching loose leash walking that a lot of people have found to be highly effective. . Fenzi Dog Sports Academy - EW100: Reducing Overarousal and Reactivity via the Circle Method of Leash Walking It's $50, but you will have access to the material for a full year, so you can refer back to it as needed. Also, the school has a very supportive Facebook community that any student is eligible to join.
 
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I'd be concerned about possible neck injuries if she's bulling that hard on a head collar. Have you tried a front clip harness?

Also, I'm going to recommend an online self study course about a method of teaching loose leash walking that a lot of people have found to be highly effective. . Fenzi Dog Sports Academy - EW100: Reducing Overarousal and Reactivity via the Circle Method of Leash Walking It's $50, but you will have access to the material for a full year, so you can refer back to it as needed. Also, the school has a very supportive Facebook community that any student is eligible to join.
I did try a front clip harness breifly when she was a bit younger. At the time she just did this weird sideways walk while still pulling. I might try that again now that shes a bit older. She has since grown out of the one we had.
 

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It might be worth another try, especially if you couple it with the circling technique taught in the class I linked.
 
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I am unfamiliar and have no personal experience with the Fenzi Academy courses, but I do know that they have a wonderful reputation here at the forum and are frequently recommended for a variety of behaviour issues. Certainly worth looking into.

The only other thing I might add is this. A head halter is a tool that typically works by the principles of aversion. Basically, similar to other aversive tools such as choke or prong collars, it only shows the dog what you DON'T want him to do. And unfortunately, it neglects to show him what you DO want him to do. The second half of this equation is tremendously important but often overlooked.

I would somehow convey to the dog that walking without pulling gets reinforcement, rather than pulling gets punishment.. I tend to favour what's known as the 'choose to heel' method as a good starting point.
 

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I'll look into the class, it sounds like a good idea. I think I've slacked a bit on training for her, and I'm going to try my best to make up for that. Thankfully she's still young and learns quickly. There's much I need to work on with my other dog as well, who could probably benifit from professional training.

Edit: Wanted to add that we will be getting a front clip harness (most likely the Gentle Leader brand, unless anyone has suggestions?) sometime soon to see how that works for her.
 

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I am unfamiliar and have no personal experience with the Fenzi Academy courses, but I do know that they have a wonderful reputation here at the forum and are frequently recommended for a variety of behaviour issues. Certainly worth looking into.

The only other thing I might add is this. A head halter is a tool that typically works by the principles of aversion. Basically, similar to other aversive tools such as choke or prong collars, it only shows the dog what you DON'T want him to do. And unfortunately, it neglects to show him what you DO want him to do. The second half of this equation is tremendously important but often overlooked.

I would somehow convey to the dog that walking without pulling gets reinforcement, rather than pulling gets punishment.. I tend to favour what's known as the 'choose to heel' method as a good starting point.
Could you explain more about the 'choose to heel' method? I'm sure I should know what it is but I cant recall hearing about it before.
 

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Have a look at the "Freedom No-pull Harness"

it is slightly different then most front attach harnesses as it also utilizes a standard back (shoulder blade area) attachment.
 

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Could you explain more about the 'choose to heel' method? I'm sure I should know what it is but I cant recall hearing about it before.
Choose to heel helps to build a reinforcement history for the desired 'no-pulling' behaviour.

It is typically initiated by training in a safe secured area without any leash or collar. Then, once a history is solidly built, it's transferred over into walking with a leash and collar in a public or 'real world' scenario.

Basically, the choose to heel technique helps to show the dog by way of example "THIS" is what I want you to do and roughly where I expect you to be. By eliminating the collar and leash during the early training, it affords the dog an opportunity to make the CHOICE of heeling in the proper position and thus receiving reinforcement (food treat). Or conversely, the dog can choose to not heel and receive no reinforcement.

It is often used to train precise heeling position and constant eye contact needed for competition obedience dogs, but the stricter criteria can be relaxed a bit in order to train simple everyday neighbourhood walking for the average pet owner. The 'no-pulling' in that situation would be the goal, rather than ultimate precision and eye contact.

 
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