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Soon. We want to do it on Spring break on March. We mostly want to neuter him due to the obvious matter (Overpopulation in dogs.) and as well as the "roaming factor' when a female dog goes into heat.

And now, at 7 months of age, Vuitton has.. begun to hump my mom's leg. (LOL. )
And I'm curious about this. Will Neutering stop this behaviour? Or, training will? When he started doing this, I began to research on neutering, if it stops this behaviour.

The sites.. all give different opinions, and I'm confused. :s I'm not changing my mind, yes we are getting him neutered! (Even if this behaviour is non-fixable.)

And I'm also concerned on : Will Neutering affect any behaviours? (Personality, etc.)
Is 7 months a good age for a dog to be neutered? (So we might also do it sooner. )

Sorry for these many questions! Back in Brazil, we never even heard of neutering. o _ o And having a dog didn't require much (house breaking ) training. So.. again, sorry about aall the questions!
 

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Training will always help-you can't go wrong teaching your dog what's acceptable and what isn't. Neutering may or may not help with the humping, I'll leave that to the experts, but it won't change your dog's personality. He'll be the same dog, he just won't feel the need to hunt down females. All my pets have been altered and the altering never changed their personalities.
 

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Be careful how young you neuter him. there is no health benefits for a male to be neutered, bus serious consequences for one to be neutered, especially neutered young.

And sometimes their personalities do change. A dog who is has a shy personality, can develop real fears when the artificial confidence testosterone gives him is taken away. I have only ever had 2 dogs neutered young. a female Springer x Cocker who developed hypothyroidism (which is 4 times as likely in neutered animals) and Oliver, my terrier x (40lb). He developed severe fear issues a couple of months after being neutered. He's only 4 years old, but I've cut back the amount of food he eats by half in the last 6 months... even though he's still seriously active, so I'm becoming very concerned he has something wrong with him for him to put weight on like that. (he's still skinny, but only because I see him start to gain and cut back his food). Not that every dog that`s neutered young has issues, but there are alot of concerns for early neuter! Here`s a link that everyone (responsible owners anyway, the average person should not have an intact animal!) who is thinking about Neutering should read http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongTermHealthEffectsOfSpayNeuterInDogs.pdf
 

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Neutering will help because it will rid him of most of the hormones that make him want to hump. You may have residual humping but it shouldn't be anything training can't fix.

And by the way, neutering your dog DOES have health benefits. No testicular cancer.
 

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I've seen dogs go from friendly to suspicious and aggressive after being altered. I've seen dogs go from pushy and hyper to calmer and more relaxed. I've seen nothing happen at all.
In the same turn, I know quite a few neutered males, and they every one still hump, lift their leg and chase females when they go into heat. I've even seen neutered males tie with females.

The only guarantee with altering your animal is that it will not be able to reproduce.
 

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Hamilton was neutered at just under 8 wks old, the day before we adopted him from the SPCA. Obviously, I can't compare personality before and after, but he's healthy, sweet, happy, active, friendly, not even a little bit aggressive. He does occasionally hump things (one of his beds, and dogs that he is particularly enamored with - we discourage it with the other dogs), but doesn't hump people or really hump things very often at all. He doesn't lift his leg when he pees. Again, I didn't know what he was like before the neuter, but having brought him home the next day, I can say he didn't seem to be affected at all by having surgery. He was eating, drinking, active, alert, and didn't even notice he had sutures.
 

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depending on his breed I would wait till at minimum 10 montths of age, if possible, before neutering, as this gives them a little more time to mature, however 7 months is an acceptable age. As for behavior changes, I personally believe it depends on the individual dog. Like previous poster said. I personally only ever owned 4 male dogs, two of which were already neutered before I got them, one who was never neutered, and my current Dycen. Each one of them had different personalities.
 

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Testicular cancer is sooo rare in dogs anyway, with a majorly good prognosis (your dog gets it, you get him castrated... dog is cured) I wouldn't neuter to avoid testicular cancer. I'm more concerned with the 4 times higher rate of hypothyroidism, the 8x higher rate of bone cancer, and the 3x higher rate of prostate cancer (I may have got the prostate cancer rate and the hypothyroidism rate mixed up) in Neutered males....
 

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Testicular cancer is sooo rare in dogs anyway, with a majorly good prognosis (your dog gets it, you get him castrated... dog is cured) I wouldn't neuter to avoid testicular cancer. I'm more concerned with the 4 times higher rate of hypothyroidism, the 8x higher rate of bone cancer, and the 3x higher rate of prostate cancer (I may have got the prostate cancer rate and the hypothyroidism rate mixed up) in Neutered males....
Testicular cancer is actually the second most common cancer in dogs. At the same time, it doesn't happen that often because most owners neuter their pets. Do you have a link to where you got the statistics for the other diseases?
 

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Testicular cancer is actually the second most common cancer in dogs. At the same time, it doesn't happen that often because most owners neuter their pets. Do you have a link to where you got the statistics for the other diseases?
Yeah, I posted it already but here it is again http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongT...uterInDogs.pdf This is the best link, but there are several others.
 

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Testicular cancer is actually the second most common cancer in dogs. At the same time, it doesn't happen that often because most owners neuter their pets. Do you have a link to where you got the statistics for the other diseases?
And I have never seen that stat, do you have a link for that?
 

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And I have never seen that stat, do you have a link for that?
I haven't, either. In fact, my vet is kinda ambivalent about neutering males at ALL, and prefers for most of his non-rescue/contracted clients to wait until they're a couple or more years old - depending to some degree on owners and lifestyle (ie: can they contain/confine an intact dog). He'll DO IT sooner, but it's not his preference. He likes females spayed sooner, because of things like pyo, but males? To quote him 'limited health benefits, some definite drawbacks -more depending on breed- and some suspected ones.

This is also the Pro Raw guy, who just about wet himself in joy when he fund out our idea of raw was not raw chicken breasts alone, and that he didn't have to explain why feeding bone in and organ meat was important.
 

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Yeah, I posted it already but here it is again http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongT...uterInDogs.pdf This is the best link, but there are several others.
It says your link moved, do you have a different route to find it on that website?

And I have never seen that stat, do you have a link for that?
I haven't, either. In fact, my vet is kinda ambivalent about neutering males at ALL, and prefers for most of his non-rescue/contracted clients to wait until they're a couple or more years old - depending to some degree on owners and lifestyle (ie: can they contain/confine an intact dog). He'll DO IT sooner, but it's not his preference. He likes females spayed sooner, because of things like pyo, but males? To quote him 'limited health benefits, some definite drawbacks -more depending on breed- and some suspected ones.

This is also the Pro Raw guy, who just about wet himself in joy when he fund out our idea of raw was not raw chicken breasts alone, and that he didn't have to explain why feeding bone in and organ meat was important.
Me either. I'd be interested to see it as well.
http://www.lgd.org/library/neuter.htm
http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+2087&aid=481
http://www.petplace.com/dogs/canine-cancer-what-are-the-warning-signs/page1.aspx

The first link is the place where I originally saw the statistic, the other two are ones I found today.
 

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I haven't, either. In fact, my vet is kinda ambivalent about neutering males at ALL, and prefers for most of his non-rescue/contracted clients to wait until they're a couple or more years old - depending to some degree on owners and lifestyle (ie: can they contain/confine an intact dog). He'll DO IT sooner, but it's not his preference. He likes females spayed sooner, because of things like pyo, but males? To quote him 'limited health benefits, some definite drawbacks -more depending on breed- and some suspected ones.

This is also the Pro Raw guy, who just about wet himself in joy when he fund out our idea of raw was not raw chicken breasts alone, and that he didn't have to explain why feeding bone in and organ meat was important.
This is how I feel as well, most of the animals (I personally had altered) have been altered after one year of age, with the exception of Dyce, who was ten months (He is an escape artist and has a tendancy to wand. I didn't what to be blamed for any accidental pregnancies).
 

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HollowHeaven wrote: The only guarantee with altering your animal is that it will not be able to reproduce.
As far as I know, this is the only thing that is true for all males. I believe that recent Vet studies still recommend 6 mos for spay and neuter (might be 'non-medical' suggestion for males, b/c I've been told that it is ok to wait until 2 yo.)

Much of the neuter/spay/cancer issues come from research studies in Rotties. I don't have a reference, but should be easy enough to Google.

I got my Lab mix neutered at 6 mos, and he learned to lift his leg when he was 3 yo. Neutering does NOT stop humping. That is an observed fact. :) However, you can teach your dog Not to hump, waiting for that 'look in his eye,' anticipating the hump, and cuing him to Sit! instead.
 

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It says your link moved, do you have a different route to find it on that website?







http://www.lgd.org/library/neuter.htm
http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+2087&aid=481
http://www.petplace.com/dogs/canine-cancer-what-are-the-warning-signs/page1.aspx

The first link is the place where I originally saw the statistic, the other two are ones I found today.
Sorry, none of those links are scientific studies, or link to scientific studies, like the one I posted does. I tend to believe science over heresay on the internet
 

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Sorry, none of those links are scientific studies, or link to scientific studies, like the one I posted does. I tend to believe science over heresay on the internet
My second link does have references actually. What I want to know is if the article you posted is made up of scientific studies, why don't vets leave school with this knowledge? Why don't all or most vets know about this/discourage neutering in their patients? I'm not convinced that the obesity, diabetes and thyroid issues aren't just associated with our pets living longer and not actually castration.
And beyond all this, I think for the sake of keeping the homeless pet problem under control, most people Should have their pets neutered. I don't know many people with the dedication of those in this forum and letting all those irresponsible people run around with unneutered pets would be, well, irresponsible.
 

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Well, there is 2 and a half pages of links to studies about this stuff, and I went a head and read this stuff... I tend to believe it. Vets may actually know this stuff, but they'll lose $200 + for every male not neutered, so why would they tell you that? My vet actually discusses this stuff with me, and keeps up with the current research and does actually agree with it not being healthier to neuter a male. And it seems to be the accepted thing to do in the UK, if the UK based forum I'm on is anything to judge by.

And no, I do not tell the average yahoo at the dog park not to neuter and to wait to spay 'till 1/2 way between 2nd and 3rd heats. 90% of people should not have an intact dog, imo. but when people come looking for information on a forum, I assume they are a little better than the average yahoo. I hate misinformation, and telling people it's healthier to neuter is misinformation.
 
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