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Discussion Starter #1
My 5 month old Eskipoo is scheduled to be fixed next Wednesday! What can I expect after her surgery! Will she be in allot of pain and I imagine her play should be quite for a few days!
 

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She'll need plenty of rest, a nice quit place to lay down. She'll probably be really drowsy when you first get her home. She'll need plenty of rest for a few days. You'll be able to tell when she is starting to feel up to power again.
 

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In addition to the above, I always told clients to " play it safe " until those stitches came out. Often the dogs feel so good, its tempting for the owner to start playing ball, whatever, within a few days. I would say don't do that, remember she has had internal surgery and depending on how many stitches the vet has put in, too much exercise too soon, can force those sutures to pop. Some of the discount places don't put in enough stitches, and even if they do, keep her semi-quiet right up until those sutures come out. Also remember, once she is home and fully recovered, you may want to cut back her food just a bit within the next couple of months, especially if you see she is starting to put too much weight on. The uterus needs a lot of calories to nourish it, and once its gone, if you don't watch the food, she will indeed gain weight.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks to you both on the advice. I will take all I can get! I will let yous know how she fairs out next week!:)
 

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I would also like to add that you should bring a large towel with you when you go to pick her up... I mention this because when I picked up Elsa, she was very drowsy and needed to be carried to the car...well, she decided to urinate in her daddy's arms as a thank you. ;) So, bring a towel just in case.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I would also like to add that you should bring a large towel with you when you go to pick her up... I mention this because when I picked up Elsa, she was very drowsy and needed to be carried to the car...well, she decided to urinate in her daddy's arms as a thank you. ;) So, bring a towel just in case.
LMAO in her Mommy's probable, she's a mommy's girl so I will get her. Point taken didn't think of that. I will put a blanket down for her. Thank you!
 

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My dog was spayed before I adopted her. Her foster home allowed her to play anyway. And after I got her, even when she just went outside to go to the bathroom, she'd get all excited and play by herself!

So, my point is, because she played so much, a suture popped, and was floating around inside of her (I THOUGHT SHE HAD CANCER!!:eek: ) and now she looks like she was grilled on a BBQ! I guess it didn't hurt her!

Also, your dog will have a cone around his head to keep him from licking at his wound. YTou will need to keep that on for as long as the Vet tells you. The stiches will remain for *about* 2 weeks. So that means, no baths, and no playing :( But it's for the better! Congrats to you for fixing your dog!
 

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Not sure about females but with my male when he was neutered, he was quite mellow the next day he whinned a little bit and was a little shaky but in a day or so he was back to his normal self.. Next is my Female She wont be spayed until she is a year old or so, Im not into breeding her family has had 12-16 pups per litter
 

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no cones

I just wanted to say that none of our dogs ever had to wear a cone after getting spayed. They didn't seem bothered by the stitches. I do remember that we waited 14 days before the stitches were removed.
 

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2 weeks is about right on the stiches. Each dog is different about how they react to them. Some will want to lick/pull on them and others won't. It is safer to keep one on her when your not with her to make sure.
 

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Hi

You may wish to read this before you go and get your dogs spayed or neutered.

This is from the Professional Association of Applied Canine Trainers of which I am the Chairman. I started these observations over three years ago and have just launched them now.

Spaying and Neutering
What Your Vet and the Rescue Centres May Not Tell You

Spaying and neutering can make for a better and more affectionate family pet. It is a medical fact that spaying and neutering can prolong the life of our pets and may reduce the number of health problems in later life. Females can benefit from spaying by reducing the incidence of uterine, mammary, ovarian cancers and uterine infections such as Pyometria.

Neutering a male reduces the risk of prostate and testicular cancer. They are less likely to develop unwanted behaviour's such as marking, sexual aggression, and mounting, and are less likely to escape, roam, or fight with other dogs.

Some vets recommend that our dogs are spayed or neutered anywhere between 5 to 16 months. Many rescue centres such as Battersea Dogs Home and the RSPCA spay and neuter as a matter of course, whatever the age. My colleagues and I have some serious reservations about this advice and practice.

There have been many scientific studies on the beneficial outcome of spaying and neutering on a physiological level, but none I can find on a psychological and behavioural level.

As behavioural consultants and obedience trainers, we find that we are treating many more cases where dogs are displaying (paedomorphic) tendencies. That is puppy like behaviours in adult dogs, which we believe could be related to the incidence of early spaying and neutering.

We have also observed that bitches spayed too early may be far more interesting to intact males; unwanted male attention may cause the female to become aggressive and protective of this attention in adulthood.

With regard to neutering, we believe that males should not be castrated until they have been cocking their leg for at least one month, and should be at least 10 to 16 months of age (depending on breed and size), unless there are medical or serious behavioural issues. In females, we believe that they should have at least one season first; then wait approx 3 months before considering spaying.

Many vets and rescue centres will neuter a male dog before they have cocked their leg. It is at this point dogs start to seriously mark territory. Not the half-hearted attempts we see in immature dogs. The immature castrated dog may squat for the remainder of it’s life, and may be more interesting to intact males.

This testosterone surge at between 10 and 16 months clearly turns on a dormant, hard-wired program that establishes this cocking behaviour, many hard-wired behaviours are not isolated to just one action, therefore other functions that are not so obvious may be switched on at this time. These may have social implications and behavioural effects that aid in the development of dogs psychological and physical growth. If we switch these off by neutering or spaying too early, we may be denying the opportunity to achieve both mentally and physically our dog’s full adult potential.

It has also been observed that young female dogs that show aggressive tendencies towards owners may demonstrate increased aggression after spaying. Spaying removes the production of progesterone, which is a natural calming hormone.

Progesterone receptors are found in brain cells, in nerve sheaths and in bone cells, indicating that progesterone is involved in their function. It also appears to be involved in a range of other biological activities. Therefore spaying before both physical and psychological maturity may have other long-term detrimental effects.


Many dogs that have been neutered early appear to retain far more juvenile characteristics than those neutered when mature. In other words, they retain perpetual puppy like characteristics, whilst this may initially appear endearing, who would really want a dog that shows low concentration levels and frustrated puppy like behaviour for the remainder of its life.

Because early neutering removes sex hormones, this delays maturation of “osteoclasts” resulting in delayed closing of the growth plates of the long leg bones, thereby increasing the risk of numerous orthopaedic disorders such as cruciate ligament disease and possibly bone cancer.

It can also significantly increase the risk of urinary incontinence in bitches. Early neutering also increases risk of urethral sphincter incontinence in males (A. Aaron et al., Vet Rec. 139:542-6, 1996.)

In conclusion, as an organisation we are for spaying and neutering, but at the right time, thereby allowing your dogs to reach full maturity in both body and mind.


These findings have been borne out by observation and experiences of behaviourists and trainers who are members of PAACT“The Professional Association of Applied Canine Trainers” An organisation dedicated to enhancing and bringing together the two main canine disciplines of obedience training and behavioural therapy. It is PAACT’s belief that to be able to work with dogs on a professional level, you need to be versed in both of these disciplines.

Article written by.


Stan Rawlinson Dip MTCBPT. PAACT
Chairman and Founder Member
Professional Association of Applied Canine Trainers.

Contact details for PAACT

PAACT Professional Association of Applied Canine Trainers
[email protected]
0208 979 2019
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well I guess I will find out on Wednesday. She goes tomorrow for her pre-op and surgery on Wednesday!
 

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Because early neutering removes sex hormones, this delays maturation of “osteoclasts” resulting in delayed closing of the growth plates of the long leg bones, thereby increasing the risk of numerous orthopaedic disorders such as cruciate ligament disease and possibly bone cancer.
Was this an observation too or is this based on actual research?
Its been a while since I've looked at research on early spay/neuter.

My female was spayed at 4 months of age. My mothers Poodle was neutered at 4 months of age. My grandmothers and aunt's Shih Tzus was spayed at 4 months of age. These dogs are all adults now and have not shown any ill effects of early spay/neuter....not to say they don't exist in other dogs. Most vets here recommend the procedure be done at 4-6 months of age so that is when people tend to have it done.

Thanks for posting the article. The best age to spay/neuter is very controversial unfortunately.
 

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Your decision

At least you are aware. I am not sure what you mean "you will find out Wednesday" find what out? it is the remainder of you dogs life that will be affected, but you will not know that till later, certainly not Wednesday.

Hi Vanessa

Does you mothers poodle still generally squat rather than cock it's leg? if so do you not find that unusual. Do you find any of the dogs have short attention spans. or that they can get frustrated easily?

If you were given a hysterectomy at 5 years old do you think that may affect your ability to achieve full adulthood given some the of the major hormones that achieves that have been taken away. If you were a male at 5 years old and were castrated, how do you think that would affect your ability to achieve maturity as testosterone had been removed?

The osteoclast part is based on empirical research as is the fact that aggressive females will normally get more aggressive if spayed.

I think it is worth a consideration.

Stan
 

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Hi Vanessa

Does you mothers poodle still generally squat rather than cock it's leg? if so do you not find that unusual. Do you find any of the dogs have short attention spans. ot that they can get frustrated easily?

Stan
No, he doesn't squat but he stands to urinate at times without hiking his leg. I'd have to say he hikes it a majority of the time though. One thing that I have noticed is that he seems to have maintained juvenile genitals, which from what I've read, is typical for early neuters.

As for frustration, I'd have to say that Natalie does seem to get frustrated easily at times but she definately does not have a short attention span. The other dogs do not appear to have short attention spans nor do they seem to frustrate easily.

Its difficult for me to compare because I only know a few dogs that were spayed/neutered later in life.
 

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I also forgot to mention -
My female hikes her leg frequently when off her own territory.

Also a coworker was telling me that her male Lab (neutered at 4months) squatts to urinate all the time unless another dog is present...then he hikes his leg. Is this what you were referring to or were you saying that some early neutered dogs never hike their legs?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Your decision

At least you are aware. I am not sure what you mean "you will find out Wednesday" find what out? it is the remainder of you dogs life that will be affected, but you will not know that till later, certainly not Wednesday.

I think we posted at the same time your article was not there when I posted, I will see on Wednesday. I was talking about the collar they put on their neck!
 

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Ahhhhhhh

Now I understand. with regard to the Wednesday:)

Some dogs when neutered early will occasionally cock their legs, most of the time they will stand or squat. But the cocking is a half hearted affair not the full cock where they are aiming over the post rather than at it.

Often if a female raises it;s leg to urinate it denotes high status. In the wild both alpha males and females cock to mark territory.

Stan
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Well Starla is booked for being spaded tomorrow. Hope all goes well! I will keep all posted! The vet asked about micro chipping her. Any do this!
 
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