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Discussion Starter #1
Is there any breed or information I should look into before trying later on with getting a young dog or puppy? I have a larger family (5 kids of various ages and 5 adults) plus various small animals rabbits (most of the time in their own cages but sometimes they get out), chickens, and cats.

I've looked up various breeds who do well with cats but I wasn't sure if anyone had suggestions. The shelters around here mainly have pit mixes but I have found some herding breed mixes as well. Though I wasn't sure if the breed for mix puppies mattered as much as a pure bred?

I've not owned a dog for many years and they have all been labs in the past.
 

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I would recommend finding the right individual dog rather than getting your heart set on one specific breed and nothing else. In general, and also based on the fact that your most recent try with the pittie did not work out, I think your household might enjoy a mature, fairly mellow, social, and tolerant dog. I can think of many individual dogs I've met who would be wonderful 'family dogs' and they span many breeds. I'd recommend a dog with a good history with children. I have many stories of families with a (lab, GSD, aussie, puggle, chihuahua, weimeraner, [insert breed here]) and kids who are struggling because the dog is nipping kids, or shredding their toys, or knocking them over... The list goes on. Point being, it isn't necessarily a breed thing. A puppy would be really hard, no matter the breed. I've seen many puppies either fearful, overwhelmed, or overwhelming for very active families with young children. It can be done, of course! But it comes with months of interrupted sleep and a lot of training and other work.

I'm thinking of the most family friendly dogs I've come across, like the dogs who have allowed kids to zip around them and literally hang off their necks (never recommended, but I get that it happens)... The ones who come to mind have all been young (6mo - 2yr) shelter dogs who were well matched to that family by that adoption agency.

A good idea might be to look for a retired dog with great home history from a reputable breeder, or visit your local shelter and tell them exactly what kind of dog you're looking for. You would want to bring your whole family for the meet and greet. Look for a very human-social dog who is gentle, confident, and and eager to interact. I've seen dogs who do alright with kids during a greet come back due to lack of interest in the kid or defensive behavior in a home environment. "Alright" as in, the dog in the shelter was fine with the kid, no red flags, took treats... A stark difference from the dogs that I've seen THRIVE in households with kids, the ones who are all over them (in a gentle way) from the moment they meet them. Yes, dogs get to be totally different in a home and a kid-aloof dog can turn out to be a total love bug. But by and large, that first impression between dogs and kids is pretty telling. Yes, dogs are stressed out in the shelter. But the 'bombproof' dogs that do great in homes with children are still very social with people when meeting them.
 

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I agree with Canyx, you should focus more on finding the correct individual rather than a specific breed. One that thrives surrounded by lots of people.
 

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I am a first time puppy owner and I don't know much about dogs in general, but I know for sure one thing:
DO NOT GET A PUPPY. I have plenty of time - I am at home 6 out of 7 day,
no kids in the house and a husband who does groceries
and IT IS STILL A LOT OF WORK and I am very tired after one week only.

A puppy it's a job in itself for a couple without kids. This is how I see my dog. Don't get me wrong, I love the life out of him..
but it's tough...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I grew up around labs so I do agree with the personality and not the breed of the dog. The lab pit I had to rehome is doing great with the smaller family but ours was way too much for her on a daily basis. We already are taking care of two very small kittens (that we may be stuck with as I refuse to put them in a shelter after getting them use to being handled and a healthy weight from being abandoned..). I'm fine with not getting a puppy personally. The shelters and rescues in the area have 4 month and 2 year olds a plenty to pick from. Most seem to do fine with kids and cats plus a lot of shelters allow a 30 day grace period to try the dog in the home. Something that may be a good idea with our chaotic home. But where my husband could get a out of home job and that would leave me here by myself with our youngest.. I'd feel better with a dog. Even if they aren't a guard dog it's still a reassurance for me.

My house is just a lot for any pup or dog to take in and I don't expect them to adjust right away. Chickens, cats, kids of various ages, 5 adults, another dog in the house and I'm constantly in and out from working on the garden. i expect to do the work to help them adjust, just like how I worked with the lab pit. She was timid and didn't act like a happy pup at all when we got her. When we found her new forever home she was playful and greeting everyone. Even when someone else took her leash she didn't change a bit. So I am glad I adopted her even for a short time to help her along.
 

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I strongly agree with focusing on the individual and with centering your search on rescues and shelters. Be choosy in your search. Try to find the facilities that actually know their dogs and are committed to seeing them go to the right homes. Look for that outgoing, happy, relaxed dog. See if it's possible to test them around cats before bringing them home. Definitely bring the entire family, and nix any dogs who are just "tolerating" everything.
 

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I am a first time puppy owner and I don't know much about dogs in general, but I know for sure one thing:
DO NOT GET A PUPPY. I have plenty of time - I am at home 6 out of 7 day,
no kids in the house and a husband who does groceries
and IT IS STILL A LOT OF WORK and I am very tired after one week only.

A puppy it's a job in itself for a couple without kids. This is how I see my dog. Don't get me wrong, I love the life out of him..
but it's tough...
yes puppies are work and i have done it multiple times but its worth it in the end you're only a week in it gets better faster than you think
 

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to answer your question look in the shelters first lots of good dogs and puppies just go there they dont advertise puppies on line they move fast
 

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Is there any breed or information I should look into before trying later on with getting a young dog or puppy? I have a larger family (5 kids of various ages and 5 adults) plus various small animals rabbits (most of the time in their own cages but sometimes they get out), chickens, and cats.

I've looked up various breeds who do well with cats but I wasn't sure if anyone had suggestions. The shelters around here mainly have pit mixes but I have found some herding breed mixes as well. Though I wasn't sure if the breed for mix puppies mattered as much as a pure bred?

I've not owned a dog for many years and they have all been labs in the past.
A protective dog for a big family probably a big dog
 

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3 year old thread.
 
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