Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello guys,
am trying to get a new puppy right now and i need a little help from you all. I still am currently decided the breed. I want to ask about your opinion on which one to choose. The most preferred ones for me are either a golden retriever, a labraador retriever or a akita jitsu (japanese).
Which one should i choose?
I live in a apartament on the 3rd floor. I work a 9-5 job with sunday off. Ilive with my family (mother,dad and sister).I don't know which of those dogs are more suitable for an apartment and easier to learn. I can walk and take care of it after 5 of course but from 9 to 5 either my sister or father can have a look at him and walk him sometimes.
I want your opinions and your help. What to choose, how to do this? Am i making the perfect dicision. I have to mention that i LOVE dogs, and when i see love with caps lock that's real love.

Thanks people!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,267 Posts
For apartment life I would very much recommend adopting an adult dog, especially as you work a lot and won't be around to bring the dog up during its formative months. Adult Goldens and Labs are generally mild-mannered, tractable, and easily trained, and if you adopt an adult you can pick one that is already confirmed to be calm, friendly, house trained, etc. There are lots of lovely dogs in shelters and rescues through no fault of their own. Some breeders will also look for pet homes for retiring show dogs. Puppy Goldens and Labs are notorious destructive whirlwind land sharks up until about 18-24 months. As a pup my mom's Golden ate two doors, a section of drywall, and a sofa, and that was with experienced dog owners being home with him most of the time. I personally would not want to deal with probable retriever puppy noise and property damage in a rental with close neighbors.

I don't have any experience of akita jistus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,432 Posts
If you are planning to move out some time in the next 10-15 years, will you be taking this dog with you? If so, you might want to consider a smaller breed that will be accepted in rental apartments.

I also agree with parus. With your being away that long, an adult dog would be better suited.

What features/qualities are you looking for in a dog? How much time can you dedicate to training, walking, grooming, etc.?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
I don't have any experience of akita jistus.
Well, I have experience with Akitas back in the days when there was only one kind. And my first Akita did $500 damage to the apartment I lived in as an adolescent. Since that was back in the '60s, it's probably equivalent to a couple of thousand today. Tore tile off the bathroom wall, ate the bathroom door as high as the knob (I'd tried confining her there), destroyed a couch, tore up carpet.

In general, I agree with parus, I don't think any of the breeds you mention would be a good apartment choice when young. If I were living in an apartment again, I'd go for a smaller dog from a breed known to be mellow or choose something at least 3 that you can see is mellow.

If you're set on a puppy, you really need to really think it through and plan ways to meet a puppy's higher-than-adult needs for at least 18 months and maybe 2 years. It's hard to housebreak a puppy if you're gone to a job for long hours. Crate confining that long and then again at night when you need to sleep isn't fair. An ex-pen can work, but you need to be very careful that it will be safe with a puppy left alone trying to figure out how to get out for hours. Puppies need constant supervision when loose. They may bark and cry when left alone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,203 Posts
Another vote for looking into getting an adult instead of a puppy if those are the breeds you are interested in. And quite the contrast between the (typically) happy-go-lucky Labrador or Golden and the (typically) reserved and somewhat suspicious of people Akita Jitsu, aka Japanese Akita.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Ah, LeoRose, your post made me go to the AKC website and look because I thought the Akita as I knew it had split into two breeds - American Akita and Japanese Akita, with IMO a considerable difference in the two. I see that's not true, that AKC only recognizes one Akita breed but some other registries have Akita Inu as the Japanese type. I got my first Akita in the '60s and she would be more the Japanese type. My second in the 80s, and she was very much American type, and yes, both reserved dogs. Polite and tolerant with strangers but not enthusiastic. Very different from the Rottweilers I have now.

Sorry for taking thread off track.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,203 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
IMHO, those breeds are too large for apartment life. If you want an active, intelligent dog that isn't large, I suggest you consider one of the Terrier breeds.

Remember, there are 4 people sharing that apartment......add in a people sized dog and you could be too crowded. You should verify with the landlord regarding any restrictions on pets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,267 Posts
IMHO, those breeds are too large for apartment life. If you want an active, intelligent dog that isn't large, I suggest you consider one of the Terrier breeds.
Eh, my giant schnauzer would make a much better apartment dog than my late mini schnauzer would have, apart from potential landlord restrictions. In my experience, a big dog can often "take up less space" than a smaller dog, as many large/giant breeds tend to be more mellow than many small breeds as adults. I lived in a 400 sq foot cabin with my 100 pound boy and it was fine, because he spends most of his time snoozing on the sofa. Big dogs also don't give that feeling of being constantly underfoot that small dogs can. Plus, terriers tend to be more vocal than most other breeds, which is a big NO for communal living.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
The vocals of a terrier depend on the training of the dog. I have a mini-schnauzer who is extremely mellow with vocals. Although, much training time and effort have been expended to minimize the yap-yap-yap.

A significant difference exists when comparing a single person in 400 sq ft with a 100 lb dog in a home to 4 people with a 100 lb dog in a 900 sq ft home.

BTW, I was only offering an alternate group for a potentially crowded situation.

Sorry, if I stepped on anyone's opinion or toes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
I’m sorry, but this is not a good idea - given your living situation. Unless your family is on board 100% to help all the time, there is no way you should get a puppy. They need to go out every couple hours at first. They need to be potty trained, as well as teaching manners and how to communicate with each other.
Puppies are usually rambunctious and full of energy. Those breeds you mentioned (Especially as a puppy) need lots of exercise, space and training.
It’s time to think about an older rescue dog with low every and exercise requirements. Unfortunately You can’t just expect to have a dog sit around all day waiting for you to get off of work without getting into trouble.
There are thousands of rescues who are super sweet and mellow. They would be much better off in your situation. Good luck to you.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top