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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are getting a shepherd/husky/pitbull mix puppy next week. I am so nervous. She is going to be six weeks old when we get her.
We already have a 7 year old shepherd/husky mix. I'm so worried how she is going to act to the new puppy.

Here is our current furbaby, Alexis


Here is a pic of her. My daughter named her Chloe
 

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The puppy is still too young to be homed with you... she needs to stay with her mother and littermates for another two weeks at least, to pick up vital socialization skills.

Otherwise, the puppy looks adorable, and so does Alexis. If Alexis is generally okay with other dogs, the puppy shouldn't be an issue. Remember to introduce them on neutral territory and all should be fine.
 

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Yes, be careful taking a puppy from the mother at 6 weeks.. It's too early. In most states it's actually illegal to take a pup from the mother before 8 weeks. This is also the time period in which she will learn 'bite inhibition' from her litter mates.. See if you can't leave her with them for two more weeks.

Alexis and Chloe are adorable by the way :)
 

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I'm sure Alexis and Chloe will do just fine. I think I would tell the breeder to keep her with her litter mates for a while longer, a few weeks two at the most. Just because it's the best for the puppy. She is so cute. Just have someone hold Alexis on a leash or maybe put them in two sepperate crates side by side.:)

~Laura!
 

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We are getting a shepherd/husky/pitbull mix puppy next week. I am so nervous. She is going to be six weeks old when we get her.
We already have a 7 year old shepherd/husky mix. I'm so worried how she is going to act to the new puppy.

Here is our current furbaby, Alexis


Here is a pic of her. My daughter named her Chloe

Yes, 6 weeks old is too young to leave the mother and litter, and illegal in many states for the breeder to let pups that young be taken to new homes. So, unless there is a very very good reason why the pup's being released so young, I would run, not walk, run from this "breeder." If you've already paid, and decide to not take the pup, your money should be refunded in full. Otherwise, go to small claims court if you must to get it back. Only you can decide whether or not the breeder is releasing the pup so young for a valid reason. Best of luck whatever you decide.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There are 11 pups in this litter and from what I've been told the mom started weaning them at 3 weeks old....I have no clue if that is normal for a litter..
 

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Well, I'm not sure if that's normal or not, but just because they're "weaned" doesn't mean they're ready to leave the litter. There are other important things they pick up from being with their brothers and sisters, and their mother just a little longer... Like, socialization skills, maybe even some doggy traits.

With kittens and cats, I've experienced first-hand what it's like taking in a kitten just a little to young. It was harder to litter-train, and that's when I researched and was told that mother cats can actually teach their kittens how to do things, given the proper time. And later she was even aggressive towards her own brother, which we took in as well... They would literately fight and scratch and draw blood on each other- Not normal behavior to me.

Dogs of course are different like night and day from cats, but I'm sure the principle behind the matter still applies.
 

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The age at which they're weaned doesn't mean anything... Just because they aren't on mother's milk anymore doesn't mean they're ready to leave home. They need to learn a lot of social skills from their mother and littermates that will help them become balanced, stable dogs in the future. They learn how to play without biting too hard; how to project canine body language and accurately read canine body language; how to accept discipline; how to interact with other dogs without being too pushy or too timid. It doesn't seem like two weeks between the ages of 6 and 8 weeks could make that much difference, but I assure you it does.
 
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