Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright so my guard dog died today even tho I won't be buying a German Shepherd immediately it will be within the next year or so. I have always loved German Shepherds. I have had interaction with both kinds of lines that are most common. The working line I see alot because I live next to and go on a military base and that seems to be there breed of choice. Show line I see because I have friends with them. There are three or four other lines I briefly read about but other then that I don't know much about them.
Background:
I have seven huskies I have a sled team and I show Agility, Rally, weight pulling, CaniCross, and Conformation going to try fly ball this year. I also have litter which is why it will be a year or so. I currently have five puppies and I'm keeping two from the litter.
I would work with it. I'm a husky trainer so it would worked with right along with the Huskies. My business is from my house.
I have a little sister who absolutely loves dogs. I know German Shepherds aren't huskies so with that said she knows safety rules with breeds and the correct way to handle things.
I need to know which German Shepherd type would fit my life style best? I would never not want it if it didn't fit but I prefer to have one that does. What's everyone's opinion?

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,927 Posts
I would say a biddable female from working lines. I have a dog right now that would be perfect (but she is my dog and we have tracking titles and other stuff we are doing).

Females tend to make good matches as pets in active homes.

That said, most GSDs are not good dogs to have in a pack of dogs. They play differently and act differently. If they are to run with the huskies I suggest you just get another husky.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I would say a biddable female from working lines. I have a dog right now that would be perfect (but she is my dog and we have tracking titles and other stuff we are doing).

Females tend to make good matches as pets in active homes.

That said, most GSDs are not good dogs to have in a pack of dogs. They play differently and act differently. If they are to run with the huskies I suggest you just get another husky.
She would get trained with huskies but not necessarily run around with them if you know what mean. She would run around and play with me while the huskies are at break or playing she would stay with me. It would just be when we are training she would get trained also.
Female is what I thinking also I didn't think a male would work I guess.
Huskies really aren't guard dogs lol they are lick your face dogs hahaha

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk

Don't want to take your German Shepherd she is yours sounds super sweet and good things to work on :)

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,384 Posts
Not sure it will be easy to find the balanced farm family herding lines. aloof, tolerant balanced.. went well with multiple dogs and multiple breeds. They went well with reactive breeds because they wouldn't react.. they just ignore when I was looking to replace my GSDs all I could find was suspicious nervous edgy they reminded me of Mals... so I went to another breed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What do you need a guard dog for?
Because people are stupid and if they know you have huskies at your house all the time it kind of makes you a target for stolen dogs and a GSD just like a Weimaraner won't let just anyone come in. They will protect the home. My dog that died was a Weimaraner named Macy.

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,428 Posts
My GSD would probably lick a burglar to death. Just saying...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
If the ''job description'' for the new dog is simply ''guard dog'' Dobermans, Rottweilers or anything similar is an option as well.

From experience I know that you can get your heart set on a certain breed but sometimes you end up with the perfect dog for your situation that's not even close to the breed you had in mind so don't ignore other excellent ''guard breeds'' just because you want a GSD.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
If the ''job description'' for the new dog is simply ''guard dog'' Dobermans, Rottweilers or anything similar is an option as well.

From experience I know that you can get your heart set on a certain breed but sometimes you end up with the perfect dog for your situation that's not even close to the breed you had in mind so don't ignore other excellent ''guard breeds'' just because you want a GSD.
That's really good advice okay. It would also be a pet obviously. I don't know how to have an animal and just treat it like it's not there. So it would get all sorts of loved on lol

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk

My GSD would probably lick a burglar to death. Just saying...
That's good to know hahaha

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,075 Posts
My WL GSD is VERY high energy. Even though we train in IPO, she is very social and would let anyone into our house. She has very little defense and works in almost all prey. She is also young so that may shift a little, but I don't expect her to become much more protective. That is dependent on the individual dog though and the lines they come from. Also keep in mind that same sex aggression is quite common especially in female GSDs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,927 Posts
Not sure it will be easy to find the balanced farm family herding lines. aloof, tolerant balanced.. went well with multiple dogs and multiple breeds. They went well with reactive breeds because they wouldn't react.. they just ignore when I was looking to replace my GSDs all I could find was suspicious nervous edgy they reminded me of Mals... so I went to another breed.
It has become more difficult to find good dogs, but they do exist. I have one. Actually I have two.
To know what you are perhaps getting it is best to talk to someone who understands the lines being bred and what they bring to the table and what they produce. No dog is perfect. I do stay away from American Show Lines because these dogs have been bred to trot around a ring and exhibit a flying trot. That is the focus of ASL breeding. When you breed for one or two traits you will get those traits but you will lose other traits and temperament that are important (just look at what the show ring has done to English and Irish setters!). A lot of ASL are shy, nervous (but not all! some breeders care about temperament). I also avoid West German Show lines for the same reason although I will temper that with WGSL producing some very nice pets too.. again, you need to know what the lineage is likely to bring to the table.

Working lines.. while you increase your odds of a more confident dog, you can get lots of variations in drives and so there you are.

I have been fortunate. This latest dog is from a breeder who truly knows the lines and knows what those lines and the bitches and sires will produce. This dog was not inexpensive either (I have paid less for a decent used car!). It isn't all about price tho since a lot of WGSL dogs are very expensive and are nervy (but they do well in the show ring).

A good mentor and willingness to wait to get what you want is very important.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,428 Posts
Also keep in mind that same sex aggression is quite common especially in female GSDs.
I've heard other people say that dogs fight for breeding rights, while bitches fight for breathing rights. That's no true of every GSD, of course. Leo lives with a APBT bitch with no problems, and until recently, also lived with a snarky mixed breed bitch who was extremely dog selective.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,384 Posts
It has become more difficult to find good dogs, but they do exist. I have one. Actually I have two.
To know what you are perhaps getting it is best to talk to someone who understands the lines being bred and what they bring to the table and what they produce. No dog is perfect. I do stay away from American Show Lines because these dogs have been bred to trot around a ring and exhibit a flying trot. That is the focus of ASL breeding. When you breed for one or two traits you will get those traits but you will lose other traits and temperament that are important (just look at what the show ring has done to English and Irish setters!). A lot of ASL are shy, nervous (but not all! some breeders care about temperament). I also avoid West German Show lines for the same reason although I will temper that with WGSL producing some very nice pets too.. again, you need to know what the lineage is likely to bring to the table.

Working lines.. while you increase your odds of a more confident dog, you can get lots of variations in drives and so there you are.

I have been fortunate. This latest dog is from a breeder who truly knows the lines and knows what those lines and the bitches and sires will produce. This dog was not inexpensive either (I have paid less for a decent used car!). It isn't all about price tho since a lot of WGSL dogs are very expensive and are nervy (but they do well in the show ring).

A good mentor and willingness to wait to get what you want is very important.
lol lol lol lol ...it is who you know.. and what they breeding for, the breeders of the generations of my dogs were all dead before my guys past away. after 30 years in the breed the mentality in the breed was very different.. .. not all ASL were about ski slopes and dragging their butts... Am sure it is the same for you as it is for me hating the carpy working lines.. As a whole GSDs to day are not the same dogs..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
Sorry about your loss. I had dobermans that were wonderful pets and guard dogs. They also got along with my smaller dogs. I lived next to a major highway with a 10 foot block wall on that side and not too bright people tried to climb over if their car stopped. My female would jump up the wall and growl while my male waited. One day someone made it over when the dogs were busy eating, and in seconds the female had them cornered and the male circled, kept them there until I went out and called them off and let the person out, never had anyone make it over after that!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,428 Posts
If the ''job description'' for the new dog is simply ''guard dog'' Dobermans, Rottweilers or anything similar is an option as well.

From experience I know that you can get your heart set on a certain breed but sometimes you end up with the perfect dog for your situation that's not even close to the breed you had in mind so don't ignore other excellent ''guard breeds'' just because you want a GSD.
Dobermans are another breed prone to same sex aggression, particularly males. It would be the very rare good breeder who sells a male pup to a pet home that already has a resident male dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
@huskylove1995, let me say this. If you want a house dog that is your companion and protector first and foremost, then by all means get yourself a good german shepherd. There are some very good working line breeders in Canada. Focus less on types and more on what a specific breeder is producing. Basically find a breeder who is actively trying to produce what you want.
If you're more so wanting a dog to just kind of hang out and guard your property, I'd be looking more into one of the mastiff type breeds. Those dogs when bred for it are waaaaaay more equipped to handle trouble than any german shepherd........I've owned more than one of each type......as far as guarding and actually being equipped to handle trouble of both 2 and 4 legged variaties nothing beats a working mastiff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,384 Posts
OP was also looking for a dog that would get along with her Huskies.. GSD is suppose to be a tolerant breed. it has been my experience in my own group of GSD's in the breed that they do well for being tolerant to reactive dogs.. calm the situation not escalate it, and they are a good property deterrent for just being there. Now my Cane Corso is a reactive breed... not a dog that will tolerate with other breeds that are also reactive and will do a lot of quick damage to another dog. 100% being higher effective on the visual deterrent and backing it up if tested.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top