Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After watching endless hours of puppy training videos on YouTube I've become utterly lost in what I'm doing. It seems that every trainer has different dos and don'ts. But is there a universal set of rules when training a puppy?

My vet recommended a dog trainer here in town. The trainer wanted $2,500 for basic obedience training!! Now, I understand dogs can be expensive. But is this truly necessary for me, someone whose sole need is to have a puppy act with common decency? No, I don't believe so.

Now I'm sure there are others out there facing the same issue I'm having.

Please someone spill the beans!! Help ordinary dog owners give their dogs the best lives possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,338 Posts
I get most of my training instruction online, through the Fenzi Dog Sports Academy. Fenzi Dog Sports Academy - Home Check out their Pet Dog Training on-demand videos. You can buy individual videos for under $20, and there are package discounts.

I did take my SPoo puppy to PetSmart for one of their classes recently, mainly so he could see other dogs. That was $130.
 
  • Like
Reactions: KaleSalad

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,338 Posts
Now that I'm not on a cranky tablet, I'll expand upon my previous answer. To quote Denise Fenzi (who founded FDSA), "There is no 'great book of rules' about what all dogs should learn", but that every owner should decide for themselves what is important to them, and work on those. My main ones are "don't potty in the house" (still working on this one with a 5 month old puppy), and "don't kill me while on a leash". "Come when you're called" is another one I like, again, a work on progress, even with the nine year old...

The Pet Dog Training section of FDSA covers the basics from potty training to loose leash walking to recalls. If you want more in-depth stuff, they have webinars, week-long workshops, and six-week-long class sessions on just about any dog sport you could think of, as well as health and fitness.

For basic manners, then Petsmart and Petco are always an option.

Trainers who teach group classes, either on their own or as part of a dog club, are also an option. You can look for an AKC training club here. American Kennel Club - Obedience Training Clubs To look for an independent trainer, you can start here The Association of Professional Dog Trainers | APDT , here Certification for professional dog trainers and behavior consultants , or here KPA CTP Certified Training Partners Online Directory Of Dog Trainers
 
  • Like
Reactions: KaleSalad

·
Registered
Joined
·
758 Posts
Since you've researched so many sources and seen the differences, I think the first thing you have to decide is how you want to train your puppy. There are positive reinforcement only trainers, dominance theory trainers, and balanced trainers (something in between the other two). That gives you a start on weeding out advice you don't want to follow, whether in person or via the internet or in a recommended book.

Once you've decided, you sometimes have to be firm in your convictions, though. For instance, in my area, the only puppy kindergartens are run by trainers who believe in the dominance theory - I don't. My breeder's contract requires a puppy kindergarten course. So my puppy and I are attending one of those classes, and I quietly skip anything I'm not willing to do. The puppy still benefits from going to the class with other puppies and owners, and I still pick up useful nuggets of info.

Don't do anything like the $2,500 training you mentioned without having a very good idea of what kind of training that will be. Is someone going to slap a prong collar on your puppy and force compliance? You need to know and be in control of what your puppy experiences.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,126 Posts
A very basic puppy kindergarten would be a good place to start so you can at least get a feel for it. I would recommend focusing on the basics, like learning their name, sit, down, stay, and come. Once you've successfully trained those, move on to whatever else you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Now that I'm not on a cranky tablet, I'll expand upon my previous answer. To quote Denise Fenzi (who founded FDSA), "There is no 'great book of rules' about what all dogs should learn", but that every owner should decide for themselves what is important to them, and work on those. My main ones are "don't potty in the house" (still working on this one with a 5 month old puppy), and "don't kill me while on a leash". "Come when you're called" is another one I like, again, a work on progress, even with the nine year old...

The Pet Dog Training section of FDSA covers the basics from potty training to loose leash walking to recalls. If you want more in-depth stuff, they have webinars, week-long workshops, and six-week-long class sessions on just about any dog sport you could think of, as well as health and fitness.

For basic manners, then Petsmart and Petco are always an option.

Trainers who teach group classes, either on their own or as part of a dog club, are also an option. You can look for an AKC training club here. American Kennel Club - Obedience Training Clubs To look for an independent trainer, you can start here The Association of Professional Dog Trainers | APDT , here Certification for professional dog trainers and behavior consultants , or here KPA CTP Certified Training Partners Online Directory Of Dog Trainers
This is all so incredibly helpful! Thank you!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Since you've researched so many sources and seen the differences, I think the first thing you have to decide is how you want to train your puppy. There are positive reinforcement only trainers, dominance theory trainers, and balanced trainers (something in between the other two). That gives you a start on weeding out advice you don't want to follow, whether in person or via the internet or in a recommended book.

Once you've decided, you sometimes have to be firm in your convictions, though. For instance, in my area, the only puppy kindergartens are run by trainers who believe in the dominance theory - I don't. My breeder's contract requires a puppy kindergarten course. So my puppy and I are attending one of those classes, and I quietly skip anything I'm not willing to do. The puppy still benefits from going to the class with other puppies and owners, and I still pick up useful nuggets of info.

Don't do anything like the $2,500 training you mentioned without having a very good idea of what kind of training that will be. Is someone going to slap a prong collar on your puppy and force compliance? You need to know and be in control of what your puppy experiences.
Very very happy I found this forum. This is a great foundation of information moving forward. Thank you!
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top