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If you consider an older dog, you could consider taking it for bike rides. I bought a k9 jogger since I am not a runner. I attach our mixed dog (54 lbs) maybe some lab in him to it and we bike for 10 kms. It takes much less time then it does when you are biking and you can go at the dogs speed if you have a good trail to go on. We attached a mirror onto the bikes so we can easily see the dog and we go the dogs speed if he wants to speed up we do and if he wants to just walk we do that too.
Our little rat terrier/pug cross even runs 10 km's with us she is so hyper and she can usually keep up with the bigger one. It all depends on the specific dog.
 

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Hey guys I have another question. How loyal would you say Sibe Huskies are? I know they're not an one man dog but does it still love and respect their owners?
I have heard multiple times that Sibes tend to have a bit of a "cat personality"... very independent, sometimes to the point of being aloof. They certainly love their owners but don't express it in the same wagging butt, licking face, lolling tongue way that a Lab might. Again, no personal experience with the breed, just what I have heard.

Taking things a BIIIIT to the extreame?
Erick, I'd just like to say that right from the start, people on DF have been giving you tips on everything from purchasing to training to whelping to weaning. Much of it has gone ignored. It wouldn't hurt to listen.
 

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Speaking from my own experience with Sibes, loyalty isn't something high up on their list - they have their own agenda which ALWAYS involves running - to some degree!
They are independent-minded, lunatics for the most part, but do show respect for 'the boss' or they would never make good sleddogs.

We don't let ours off the lead - we've seen & heard enough to convince us otherwise - those who do, well, it's their choice I suppose, but when a dog has been perfect off lead all it's life, & takes off to be killed by a train, it must say something.
The dog in question was 11 or 12 years old.
 

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Taking things a BIIIIT to the extreame?
Not really.

My first dog, who I basically never talk about, was a Siberian. I did all the research, I went to what I thought was a good breeder (showed and health tested) and went in fully convinced if I trained enough, I could teach MY husky to be reliable off leash, at least reliable enough that in the event that a leash got dropped, he would come when called.

Miko was enrolled in puppy classes from the day I brought him home, got LOTS of exercise- I had a good job then and this was before my health got worse so I could afford a dog walker (well, runner) for him. He was my only dog and my 'kid'. We spent every waking moment I wasn't at work together.

One day, his collar (an Aspen plastic buckle collar- the same model is still sold at Petco) unsnapped while we were walking. He was walking on a not-totally-loose leash, but he wasn't pulling particularly hard, either. I had his attention for a second, with a handful of freeze0dried liver which I tossed on the ground while I reached for him- he was about 3' from me. He took one sniff, grabbed one piece, and bolted at top speed. He was at the end of the block and around the corner in seconds.

That was 10 years, 1 month, and 4 days ago. I put up flyers for over a year. I offered a reward. I walked the three closest shelters every 2 days (all had a minimum 72 hour hold time) for 9 months. And eventually, I moved on. But every time I pass a senior husky, especially grey males with a full mask and brown eyes- I wonder if this one might be him- if his owners assumed that since he didn't have a collar, someone didn't love him and allowed him to stray. If someone kept him because he was so beautiful, but not as a housepet but as a yard dog on a tie-out. If someone decided to use him to make 'wolf hybrids'. If he just got hit by a car and I never found his body. He was 7 months old. We did everything right - and the instinct to run was still too strong.

I don't think about him as much anymore. 2 months after he was lost, I got my first corgi- a co-worker found her running loose and I failed fostering 101. I moved on. But I still wonder. If I ever get another husky, that dog will ALWAYS wear a backup slip collar, and I probably will work with one of the remote (e-collar) collar guys in the area and try and proof a reliable recall that way- just in case a freak thing happens again. But I probably won't do it again. Once was enough for me to learn that while I rearely have my dogs off leash in public areas, dogs that are relatively easy to teach a reliable recall to are MUCH safer.
 

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Good read!

For me personally, Huskies fall into the category of "if you have to ask"...

My default stance is to discourage people from this breed when I'm asked. It takes quite a bit to convince me that a person is capable of handling an idiot sled dog.
 

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Not really.

My first dog, who I basically never talk about, was a Siberian. I did all the research, I went to what I thought was a good breeder (showed and health tested) and went in fully convinced if I trained enough, I could teach MY husky to be reliable off leash, at least reliable enough that in the event that a leash got dropped, he would come when called.

Miko was enrolled in puppy classes from the day I brought him home, got LOTS of exercise- I had a good job then and this was before my health got worse so I could afford a dog walker (well, runner) for him. He was my only dog and my 'kid'. We spent every waking moment I wasn't at work together.

One day, his collar (an Aspen plastic buckle collar- the same model is still sold at Petco) unsnapped while we were walking. He was walking on a not-totally-loose leash, but he wasn't pulling particularly hard, either. I had his attention for a second, with a handful of freeze0dried liver which I tossed on the ground while I reached for him- he was about 3' from me. He took one sniff, grabbed one piece, and bolted at top speed. He was at the end of the block and around the corner in seconds.

That was 10 years, 1 month, and 4 days ago. I put up flyers for over a year. I offered a reward. I walked the three closest shelters every 2 days (all had a minimum 72 hour hold time) for 9 months. And eventually, I moved on. But every time I pass a senior husky, especially grey males with a full mask and brown eyes- I wonder if this one might be him- if his owners assumed that since he didn't have a collar, someone didn't love him and allowed him to stray. If someone kept him because he was so beautiful, but not as a housepet but as a yard dog on a tie-out. If someone decided to use him to make 'wolf hybrids'. If he just got hit by a car and I never found his body. He was 7 months old. We did everything right - and the instinct to run was still too strong.

I don't think about him as much anymore. 2 months after he was lost, I got my first corgi- a co-worker found her running loose and I failed fostering 101. I moved on. But I still wonder. If I ever get another husky, that dog will ALWAYS wear a backup slip collar, and I probably will work with one of the remote (e-collar) collar guys in the area and try and proof a reliable recall that way- just in case a freak thing happens again. But I probably won't do it again. Once was enough for me to learn that while I rearely have my dogs off leash in public areas, dogs that are relatively easy to teach a reliable recall to are MUCH safer.
Oh my lord that is such a sad story. Note to self, if I ever get a husky, I must get a leash made from solid steal :p

Speaking of which, I've been speaking to a husky breeder and she has told me that an adult husky needs about 1 hour of daily exercise, which is a lot less than some reports in this thread. I am a little apprehensive about this. What do you guys think?
 

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As long as you can cram at least five miles into that one hour (and an hour all at once, not 30 min in AM then 30 min in PM). I found that a rigid schedule is very helpful in calming them down. No skipping days because you're sick or just don't feel up to it. Huskies are great dogs, it just seems like most folk want to suppress their strongest drives. Having an outlet for those hardwired tendencies makes all the difference in the world.

Let me also add that if my Husky had not been abandoned with me, I would NEVER have considered one on purpose.
 

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Dogstar- I'm so sorry to hear that!!

What a sad, sad story. You must have just been devastated.

However, it is an illustration of why having northern breeds is so tough at certain times.

Thanks for sharing. :)
 

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Oh, one thing I forgot to mention. Miko's father was a BISS winning dog. His grandfather had a UD. His mom got her CDX. They were NEVER trialed outdoors. EVER. This was as close as it gets to non-sledding, 'obedience bred' Sibes.
 

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I've only read the first page of this thread, but if you don't mind shedding and want a dog that can run and play for 30 minutes at a time and then couch potato in between, you might think about a sheltie. Small enough that they would be accepted in most apartments if you ended up renting too, the only other thing I would warn you about is that they can bark alot.
 

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Hey guys I have another question. How loyal would you say Sibe Huskies are? I know they're not an one man dog but does it still love and respect their owners?
I would say they aren't loyal at all. I had one that loved everyone, at times he will drag me to people. Although he just met, he will act like he knew them forever. :) Well of course they will love you, but also everyone else. As respect, you would have to work with that. :p
The ones I had, believe that they are lap dogs.
All dogs can love and respect their owners, it just takes some work. :D

Oh my lord that is such a sad story. Note to self, if I ever get a husky, I must get a leash made from solid steal :p
Speaking of which, I've been speaking to a husky breeder and she has told me that an adult husky needs about 1 hour of daily exercise, which is a lot less than some reports in this thread. I am a little apprehensive about this. What do you guys think?
My siberian husky gets 2-hour walks and still plays crazy with my klee kai. ;)
 

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All my neighbors have huskies, no idea why but they're the new breed of choice around here. I never understand why these same people think I'm insane for wanting a border collie. I think they're insane! :p Give me the high octane herders any day...

I've only read the first page of this thread, but if you don't mind shedding and want a dog that can run and play for 30 minutes at a time and then couch potato in between, you might think about a sheltie. Small enough that they would be accepted in most apartments if you ended up renting too, the only other thing I would warn you about is that they can bark alot.
You know, that's a really good suggestion.
 

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There is a husky in my puppie's behavior class. This particular husky is always growling at the other puppies in the class, trying to jump on top of the other puppies and is the least friendly dog in the class........he has loads of attitude, though.

The other dogs, King Charles Cav. Span., Aussie and Labradoodle stay clear of that guy.....
 

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I have heard multiple times that Sibes tend to have a bit of a "cat personality"... very independent, sometimes to the point of being aloof. They certainly love their owners but don't express it in the same wagging butt, licking face, lolling tongue way that a Lab might. Again, no personal experience with the breed, just what I have heard.



Erick, I'd just like to say that right from the start, people on DF have been giving you tips on everything from purchasing to training to whelping to weaning. Much of it has gone ignored. It wouldn't hurt to listen.
Excuse me, but if i ignored all of it, i wouldn't have living dogs right now.
 

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Taking things a BIIIIT to the extreame?
Not at all.

Excuse me, but if i ignored all of it, i wouldn't have living dogs right now.
True, but you might only have two of them if you had ignored less.



The point is that Sibes are NOT easy dogs to own, especially for someone with little familiarity with the breed and/or who is a first time dog owner. Maybe Apollo is an exception to the rule and you are the world's best trainer...if so, kudos to you. We won't know the first until Apollo has passed on, nor the second til you've trained a dozen more huskies. But it is not the norm.
 

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sibes are very independent, if you would take every breed of dog put up one of each in the wild, sibe and malamutes would be the last 2 standing
 

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I disagree :p I think the Ibizan, Cirneco D'ell Etna, Pharoah Hound, Saluki and Basenji would win that one
 

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sibes are very independent, if you would take every breed of dog put up one of each in the wild, sibe and malamutes would be the last 2 standing
That test would have very little to do with independence and a great deal to do with luck.

Existing pariah dogs would stand the greatest chance to "win" since they are actually surviving across generations in what is equivalent to "in the wild" for dogs...the niche in which dogs developed: the fringe of human settlements.
 
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