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I saw this on my blog reader this morning. Really great read. I wish we had something like this for the US, because some breed populations differ wildly (like English Setters are almost dead over there, but there are a ton in the US).

Also interesting that the summary of the article doesn't really capture the data at all. They make the picture seem rosy because inbreeding is generally diminishing, when really something like 50% of the UK's breeds have genetic populations that are too small to be sustainable. The authors should have highlighted that.
 

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Oh gosh this one is super interesting too, looking at population crashes and rises over time for breeds. 'The History of Purebred Dogs in the UK'

http://www.instituteofcaninebiology.org/blog/the-history-of-purebred-dogs-in-the-uk

I think it's neat people are starting to study this stuff more. I wish there was a way to look at a breed globally. Maybe one day but I was not surprised to see papillon inbreeding has increased dramatically over time. I'd expect that to be true across the world, but it'd be nice to have data in other countries.
 

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I imagine that relaxing the import rules in the UK made a big impact. In Welshies, specifically, sending dogs back and forth across the Atlantic is very common, but the UK effectively cut itself off from getting anybody else's dogs for a long time. So we were still getting their dogs in the US (and Sweden and Finland) but they were stuck with the population they had. I'm sure that is true in a lot of other breeds as well.

ETA: The Institute of Canine Biology blog is awesome. I love their articles.
 
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