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My 10 month lab-mix was just diagnosed with hip dysplasia. He has been gimpy for about two months. I was referred to a specialist who informed me that the TPO surgery was not an option. My only two options are the FHO and the total hip replacement. Despite it's significantly higher cost, I am electing to go with the total hip replacement. Who here has had that done? What can I expect?

Thanks,
Sam
 

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I'm sorry to hear about your pup. Poor doggle.
I do not have personal experience with this, but a client of mine has and they have never regretted it. They did one hip and then six months later did the other. They actually waited until the dog (a BMD) was almost three years old..and now regret waiting so long because the difference in the dog was THAT extreme. They thought he wasn't in too much discomfort because he still played etc...but he was an altogether happier, bouncier dog after his hips were done and he had recovered from the surgery.

Good luck. Sending you good thoughts.
 

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i would see how bad it is. if its not bad enough to do surgery then i wouldnt. severe HD would call for it. my dane was diagnosed with HD before she was 2, they said it was moderate. we let it go and just put her on joint supplents and shes fine. i highly believe it was a bad x-ray and a bad read on it- or the vet was just looking for money, combined with the fact that she was still growing.... anyway thats what we did and shes been fine. i think it was just a growth spurt causing the pain in her, combined with over activity.


but im not saying thats the case for you, just saying what happened with us. sorry i have no insight on surgery. :( good luck
 

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i would see how bad it is. if its not bad enough to do surgery then i wouldnt. severe HD would call for it. my dane was diagnosed with HD before she was 2, they said it was moderate. we let it go and just put her on joint supplents and shes fine. i highly believe it was a bad x-ray and a bad read on it- or the vet was just looking for money, combined with the fact that she was still growing.... anyway thats what we did and shes been fine. i think it was just a growth spurt causing the pain in her, combined with over activity.


but im not saying thats the case for you, just saying what happened with us. sorry i have no insight on surgery. :( good luck
The two primary vets at my regular office confirmed CHD from the x-ray, as did the specialist, thus I believe it to be. I am torn about doing the surgery soon (June) or waiting until there is increased signs of pain and discomfort. I'm sure there would be advantages of each.
 

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I see that you are my neighbor. Just curious about who will be doing the surgery. I live in Rancho Cucamonga and haven't been able to find a board certified surgeon close to home that I feel comfortable with to do orthopedic surgery. My dogs always go to VCA All Care Animal Referral Hospital in Fountain Valley. We've had luxated patellas and an FHO done there with superb results. My dogs are toy breeds so it's hard to draw a comparison with a big breed but I can tell you that they have numerous plaques in their waiting rooms from police agencies all over the state who send their service dogs there for treatment.
 

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Been there and done that with both FHO and full hip replacement. I'd say it's definitely a good call on skipping the FHO, it has lousy results when done on any dog over 40lbs, and your guy appears bigger than that.

So... hip replacement...

It's not fun. The long-term outcome is awesome but the three months following the replacement are pretty horrid. We had the full replacement done on a one year old shepherd mix who was showing arthritic changes and limping despite supplements and even pain medication.

She was in the hospital for two days following the surgery. She walked out to us (this was great!) and we were informed we should NEVER see her limp and that if we did we needed to call right away. The pain following the surgery didn't seem that bad and it wasn't long before we had to cut back on the pain meds we were giving her since she was feeling a bit to good and getting to active to quickly.

She was crated for a month straight following the surgery, no stairs, no walks, nothing. We took her outside on a leash to do her business and then right back to the crate. Lots and lots of chew toys are your friend during this time. We gave her all sorts of kongs and puzzle toys to play with.

The second month was short walks outside, starting with just down the driveway and back. We eventually built up to 10 minute walks. Still no stairs and still crated most of the time.

The third month she could start on stairs and "light" play with other dogs. I think this was actually the hardest time. There are three other dogs in the house and they all wanted to play rough but we couldn't allow that. She was also able to start going on longer walks. She was still crated when not being supervised.

Month four was when all restrictions were finally lifted. She was one HAPPY pup. By this time she had lost a lot of muscle mass but we were told not to expect a full 100% recovery until a year past the surgery. She won't actually hit that point until this coming July but so far so good. She's gaining muscle and you could never till that one hip is fake.

Our surgeon advised against any sort of physical therapy. He felt the risk of re-injuring the leg because of a slip during therapy was to great and that time is a much better healer. So far that seems to be right on for us. She's doing great *knock wood* and seems no worse for wear from having to spend so much time in the crate.

My only real advice is make sure your dog is used to a crate and that you have lots of good crate toys available. Outside of that just count down the days until recovery is over. Soon enough you'll both forget those long three months and you'll have a pain-free and happy dog again.
 

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I see that you are my neighbor. Just curious about who will be doing the surgery. I live in Rancho Cucamonga and haven't been able to find a board certified surgeon close to home that I feel comfortable with to do orthopedic surgery. My dogs always go to VCA All Care Animal Referral Hospital in Fountain Valley. We've had luxated patellas and an FHO done there with superb results. My dogs are toy breeds so it's hard to draw a comparison with a big breed but I can tell you that they have numerous plaques in their waiting rooms from police agencies all over the state who send their service dogs there for treatment.
Lulusmom,
I had to drive to Veterinary Surgical Specialists in Tustin. It is not too much closer than Fountain Valley.
 

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If you are going to Veterinary Surgical Specialists, you have hit the jackpot and believe me, it is well worth the drive. I work in rescue and Dr. Peter Sebestyen, DMV, DIPLOMATE ACVS, has saved the lives of two of our little furballs. We had consults with three surgeons who could not help one of our little guys and all three recommended euthanasia. She is a four pound toy poodle named Audrey and both of her front legs were shattered at the ankle, probably due to being dropped or jumping from a high elevation. Dr. Sebestyen took one look at her xrays and told us he could help her. We were elated to hear that new and he was true to his word. He did a magnificent job and she is now in a new forever home, jumping, running and enjoying the dog's life that she was meant to have. If this is where you are taking your baby, they'll probably remember Audrey and they'll also remember Casper who just had double luxated patella surgery done two weeks ago.
 

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If you are going to Veterinary Surgical Specialists, you have hit the jackpot and believe me, it is well worth the drive. I work in rescue and Dr. Peter Sebestyen, DMV, DIPLOMATE ACVS, has saved the lives of two of our little furballs. We had consults with three surgeons who could not help one of our little guys and all three recommended euthanasia. She is a four pound toy poodle named Audrey and both of her front legs were shattered at the ankle, probably due to being dropped or jumping from a high elevation. Dr. Sebestyen took one look at her xrays and told us he could help her. We were elated to hear that new and he was true to his word. He did a magnificent job and she is now in a new forever home, jumping, running and enjoying the dog's life that she was meant to have. If this is where you are taking your baby, they'll probably remember Audrey and they'll also remember Casper who just had double luxated patella surgery done two weeks ago.
That's great to hear. In fact Dr. Sebestyen was the surgeon that my vet recommended and that I met with.
 

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Here's another story for you about your surgeon. A friend in cat rescue took a really sweet cat with a major deformity to Dr. Sebestyan for a consult. This cat looked like somebody put his hind legs on backwards. In other words, his feet and knees were behind him and facing straight up. It was a long shot but my friend loved this cat and wanted to save him. Believe it or not, Dr. Sebestyan turned his legs around and he walks like a champ now. I'll see if I can get some before and after pictures for you because you'll be amazed. I have attached pictures of Casper, on his way home the day after his double patella surgery and a picture of Audrey recovering after her double surgery.

casper1.jpg

casper2.jpg

Audrey in Pink.jpg
 
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