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Discussion Starter #1
This may be a long post, so I appoligize ahead of time.
My boyfriend and I started back in March/April, talking about getting a puppy when he was done his next bit of apprenticeship schooling, he finished in June. WHile he was away at school I started going online scoping out SPCA's, rescues, animal shelters, and even petfinder to see what was out there. I knew what we needed in a dog; had to be 20" or under (regulations for our living right now), had to be good with kids as we have a 3 year old daughter, had to be good with cats and other dogs and young ( puppy to under 5 yrs or so). We bother agreed on those and I started emailing SPCA's, rescues and shelters ... most of them never wrote me back. The dogs I did inquire about and get a response from, were either not kid friendly or friendly towards cats or other dogs, a couple rescues wanted me to flat out fill out and sign an adoption form before allowing me to view the dog in person. Out of curiousity one day I searched for a Brittany breeder and got a response that day that he had puppies to be born in the next day or so.

My boyfriend agreed that we could go look at the puppie when they were born, and if it's what I really wanted to do then we could get one. I paid a $100 deposit on a puppy, and another $650 when they brought her to our house on July 13th. I also paid about $200 for a crate, food, food/water bowls, toys etc. My boyfriend, now says he never wanted a dog, she's my pet project and my responsibility. I've asked him a couple times to take her for a walk because I was busy at that moment, and he has ... but if she poops in the yard he wont clean it up, he'll tell me to do it when I'm done doing w/e. He just doesn't seem very supportive about this at all.

I'm a stay at home Mom, so my job is hard enough already especially now with a 3 year old child and a 9 week old puppy.I'm also having problems with our puppy, her name is Bragdons Casey Marie, we call her Casey. The first few days we had her she seemed fine, then after that she started biting, not gentle either. When I emailed the breeder AND the people who's bitch had the puppies, they're only suggestion was to, when she botes, grab her muzzle and pull her lips over her canine teeth, until she yelps, apparently it works with all the breeders other dogs. I tried it for a while and it worked. But now when I go to disepline her and do that, she comes back and bites me and then jumps back. If I go to pet her head she'll nip at my hand, shes bit me hard enough to break skin several times. When she has, what I call a biting fit, I do what the Vet suggested and pin her on her back or her side until she calms down, which works for a few mins then it starts all over again.
My boyfriend thinks I should take her back to the breeder and get my money back. I'm almost tempted to do that, I enjoy her, but lately she seems to be frusterating me more then I enjoy being with her.

Does anyone have any suggestions on what I should do or try with our puppy behavior wise or just in general about the situations?:confused::(

Kristin
 

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when she bites, grab her muzzle and pull her lips over her canine teeth, until she yelps, apparently it works with all the breeders other dogs. I tried it for a while and it worked. But now when I go to discipline her and do that, she comes back and bites me and then jumps back. If I go to pet her head she'll nip at my hand, shes bit me hard enough to break skin several times. When she has, what I call a biting fit, I do what the Vet suggested and pin her on her back or her side until she calms down, which works for a few mins then it starts all over again.Kristin
This is, quite simply, bad advice and is a good example of the pitfalls of using punishment..especially in a puppy who is still learning what is and what is not scary or dangerous in life. She has now learned your hands cause pain.

Vets are NOT behaviourists and are often (but not always) clueless when it comes to normal doggy social behaviour. Alpha rolls are not a good idea and again especially not for a puppy. See the stickies for info on doggy zen, the bite stops here and rev up exercises. STOP using your hands for punishment. She is a teething puppy..she needs to chew and bite on things and it is up to you to direct her to the correct things.

You have a couple of options:

ONE: go it on your own with the help of a qualifiied trainer (www.apdt.com) be prepared to put in the work to fulfill your dog and your wishes for a good dog. If this is your choice..you need to find a trainer NOW..to help you undo the damage done and to learn how to handle your puppy properly so that she becomes a safe dog.

Two: Talk again to boyfriend. Nicely. When he's not tired or cranky or watching tv. Tell him how disappointed you are that he's changed his mind and that you really wish he would learn to love the dog. This may or may not work. If it does, get a trainer (apdt again) and start NOW.

Three: Decide to work it out on your own, sans hubby. Or try to get him on your side...if he isn't then it's up to you but this often fails..not enough time to train and exercise the pup etc..pup gets relegated to backyard etc etc.


Four: Return the pup. If you cannot get your boyfriend on board this may be your best option. Brittanies are hunting dogs..very high energy, require a lot of training and a LOT of exercise. If you don't think you can do it on your own and neither she nor you will enjoy your life together...breeder it is. I hope the breeder will take her, if you request it...because anyone who breeds sporting dogs and sells em without a full interview of adult family members or has pups "coming in a day or two" reeks of byb. Did you get a contract with them? If the breeder won't take her, look for a breed specific rescue to help find her a new home.
 

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My boyfriend thinks I should take her back to the breeder and get my money back. I'm almost tempted to do that, I enjoy her, but lately she seems to be frusterating me more then I enjoy being with her.
Your chances of finding a puppy who is more joy than frustration are exceedingly slim. Puppies bite, they poop, they chew things to bits, and they whine and bark. She hasn't gotten anywhere near her peak of mischief making yet. Not by a long shot.

A Brit is a high energy dog. They are not the worst of the sporting breeds, but that is a comparative scale. They are also spaniels so they tend to be pretty soft. They don't tolerate harsh discipline especially well--even as adults. The good news is that Brits are among some of the sweetest and most biddable of the sporting breeds. It just takes time, consistency, patience, and lots of room to run.

Get thee to a puppy class. Also, learn to: a) live with your boyfriend's lack of interest in sharing the responsibility; b) get rid of the dog, or; c) get a new boyfriend. I vote "C", if I'm being asked.
 

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You're getting some really bad advice from your vet and the breeder and your bf not being supportive is way out of line.

Let's start at the beginning....9 week old puppies are scared to death...that's the way they come. They have only two options when they feel threatened...fight or flight. Puppies also play bite...they don't know any better and it can hurt.

Rolling her over and grabbing the muzzle will only make things worse...the puppy has no choice but to defend itself more aggessively as you've already witnessed...nipping your hand now when you go to pet her...she's becoming hand shy because of the rough treatment.

So, I guess your questions are... how to teach a scared puppy not to bite...how to build confidence and trust....how to make her environment safe and non-threatening?
The BF is a huge question mark and will either help or make things worse for the new pup.
 

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First, regardless of whether or not he wanted a dog, he's got one, and raising her has to be a communal effort. It seems like there was a lack of communication with regard to whether or not he really wanted a dog, but once it arrived, he has to pull his weight. If he didn't want a dog, it was up to him to say so - especially if he went to look at the pups with you. Now that the dog is here, it's irrelevant - the dog needs to respond to the both of you, so he needs to be 100% commited to the same training and discipline that you're using.

The first few days we had her she seemed fine, then after that she started biting, not gentle either. When I emailed the breeder AND the people who's bitch had the puppies, they're only suggestion was to, when she botes, grab her muzzle and pull her lips over her canine teeth, until she yelps, apparently it works with all the breeders other dogs. I tried it for a while and it worked. But now when I go to disepline her and do that, she comes back and bites me and then jumps back. If I go to pet her head she'll nip at my hand, shes bit me hard enough to break skin several times. When she has, what I call a biting fit, I do what the Vet suggested and pin her on her back or her side until she calms down, which works for a few mins then it starts all over again.
I think you've gotten some very, very bad advice. Look carefully at those two bolded sentences. The reason she's biting at you when you reach for her is because she thinks you're about to assault her again. To make things worse, you've basically confirmed her fears by forcibly pinning her to the ground after already eliciting a defensive reaction from her.

The bad news is you've now got two problems to solve: puppy biting (normal), and a fear response to humans. The good news is you've got plenty of time to fix it. Start by getting her to understand that good things happen when she's around people. Praise her exhuberantly, and reward her freely for simple things like being calm, sitting up, making eye contact, etc. Try hand-feeding her for a while - let her know that good things come from your hands, too. When she bites you (and she will), it's time to start stage two: using the techniques listed in The Bite Stops Here.

You're trying to create two associations in her head: (1) good things happen when she's around people, and (2) people go away if she bites them, even a little bit. Point #1 is the single most important thing she can ever learn - she cannot be trained on anything else if she's afraid of the people she's living with.

This is also why your bf's support is crucial - dogs don't generalize well, and it could get into her head that if she can't bite you, she can bite other people. Or, that you will treat her well, but everyone else is dangerous - therefore, she has to keep everyone away from you. She needs to encounter as many diffent people, places, and things as possible, and learn that she has to behave the same way with all of them.
 

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Umm... I'm thinking a puppy wasn't the right choice for you at all. All the puppies I've helped raise or been around are what you are describing. It takes time to learn not to bite and negative punishment most likely won't do much to solve your problem. It seems like you are just upsetting the puppy and that's why she continues to bite after you mess with her and make her yelp...that sounds terrible. Hurting her will not make her listen to you. When she's biting make an unpleasant noise and give her a toy she can chew on. I have heard some people suggest using bitter apple spray on your hands although I have never used it. Right now I have an 11.5 week old papillon at my house, and he is a lot of work. It's just like having a human baby...they have lots of needs. Luckily my boyfriend has been helping out a lot with the new puppy, but if he didn't it was still my decision to get a puppy and I would take full responsibility myself. It's unfortunate that your boyfriend said he would help care for the dog and doesn't but it was still your choice in getting a puppy you shouldn't just give up on her. The statement where you said "she just seems to be frusterating me more then I enjoy being with her." is quite sad. I mean sure puppies are frustrating, but you should have put more thought into what a puppy is really like before you went out and purchased one.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I know and Understand that puppies do and need to bite. I'm not totally new to owning or being around dogs. Before I got her, even before I thought seriously about getting a dog I bought several books on owning and raising puppies and ALL of them have different ways of dealing with biting. I emailed the breeder as I figured he would have the right answer for me, since he IS supposed to be a professional, but apparently not.


Cracker :
I understand what your saying. I've tried a few times, especially the past 3 days, to get my bf to understand that yes he did say we could get a dog. He told me he only said yes because I'd asked him a couple times before and he felt it would be the only way to make me happy or shut me up. He said he's not a dog person and had no interest in getting a dog for quite some time. He said he CAN clean up dog poop, yet he took her out a couple mornings ago and never cleaned it up. About the breeder, all I had to do to get approved for a puppy was answer a few questions Via email. I never spoke to him on the phone nor did I meet him in person. He gave me the name, phone # and address of the people who owned the bitch that was to have the puppies. Also yes there was a contract, my bf said it looked legit. One part in the contract says and I quote: "Should the buyer for any reason wish to give up ownership of the puppy, the breeder will take back the dog, no questions asked. The breeder will attempt to resell the dog, any money remaining after incurred expenses will be returned to the buyer. "

Marsh Muppet:

I know puppies poop, bark, whine and bite and chew stuff. I can do with time, consistancy and patience.

TooneyDogs:
I understand that the advice I was given before, by the Vet and the breeder is wrong. But I was only doing what they had told me to do. I felt them being pro's ( or so i thought anyway) that what they suggested would be the right advice.. the question you asked at the end there, yes those are what I want to know.
 

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One other way to think about it...would you hurt your daughter if she did something that was developmentally appropriate even if it was out of line or hurt someone? I bet that when she was two she went through a phase of hitting at the slightest frustration. Would you have grabbed her and purposely hurt her as punishment to teach her to behave? If your answer is yes, please return the puppy to the breeder or better yet, a rescue group. From the sounds of the breeder, I am not sure he/she knows very much about good training either.

If your answer is no, the same is true of dogs. Hurting them to teach them a lesson will not be more effective. You will simply end up with a scared, scarred (sic) adult dog who will certainly not make your life any easier. She will also likely bite your daughter if she has not already done so.

Try getting some of the books mentioned on this forum that explain positive reinforcement techniques. Find a trainer. Socialize her with other dogs, people, noises, etc. Teach her to walk on a leash, play ball, do tricks, anything that will wear her out.

As for the boyfriend, I can only say that it seems like a pretty big breach of contract to toss it all back in your lap after you had both been involved in the decision. I would find a trainer, umm counselor, for that situation too if I were you.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
First, regardless of whether or not he wanted a dog, he's got one, and raising her has to be a communal effort. It seems like there was a lack of communication with regard to whether or not he really wanted a dog, but once it arrived, he has to pull his weight. If he didn't want a dog, it was up to him to say so - especially if he went to look at the pups with you. Now that the dog is here, it's irrelevant - the dog needs to respond to the both of you, so he needs to be 100% commited to the same training and discipline that you're using.

He agreed to US getting a dog. Now he calls it " Your pet project". I don't see Casey as being "My pet project". He also says i was the one that wanted the dog and not him. When I asked him if we could get a dog, he said yes we could get one as a FAMILY. He hasn't put any money into Casey. I spent around $1000 on her, and he refuses to buy her anything really. He just flat out says he didn't want her and that she's not his responsibility. Even though I asked him, and he said we could. I dont understand him. :(

LilOllie:

I know all puppies are like this, i just want the RIGHT way to get her over her biting. I'm not intentionally trying to be harsh with her. I'm just doing what I was told by vet and the breeder. It's frusterating cuz yeah it doesn't seem to be working and obviously it is the wrong thing to do. Which I also don't understand why a breeder would suggest it if its so negative. I read up on puppies for several months before we even decided to get one, but like I said before each one of the books I read had differant ways of dealing with biting. :confused:

Lwood:

No, I would never hurt my daughter and I never will. I wasn't trying to intentionally do any harm to Casey, I was simply following advice I got from what I thought were proffesionals.

I've looked up trainers in our town, the only one here, is a personal protection and obidience trainer and it looks liek, from his site, that he only deals with training dogs to protect. My boyfriend and I have been seeing a counselor but stopped back in March as he left for school. We're going to make an apt to go see a new one again as we clearly need it.
 

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For the biting, the advice given earlier on the link The Bite Stops Here is right on the mark. The confidence, trust and removing the threats takes more time. You can fast track some of that by not talking....yes, not talking. Using just your body language and treats for luring and shaping you can teach her the things she needs to know 5x faster than using verbal commands.

Here's an example of a sit that's used in puppy class (which by BTW I highly recommend ASAP): Hold a tasty treat at nose level and then slowly raise it directly over her head, moving the treat towards her tail...let her eyes follow the treat up up...her rump should hit the floor as you pass her head. Give lots of praise. Once she learns that hand signal for sit, you can start adding the verbal cue.

This is non-threatening...no verbal confusion and has the added side effect of her watching your body movements more intently.

Teaching the basic obedience commands.....getting rewarded and getting praised shows her exactly what will get your attention.....not the biting or other bad behavior and starts to teach her how to respond to situations. For example; sitting polietly for petting or meeting guests. She craves structure and routine.....that's what builds confidence. Not knowing what she has to do, when or how is very unsettling.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanx for the advice TooneyDogs.:)
I don't really want to get rid of Casey, I do like her. I think I DO need to just slow down and take a deep breath when I'm getting frusterated with something she's done or not doing. She IS a good dog ... I guess I'm just looking to much at the bad habits she has.

I've worked on the sit with her using treats. I do that for a few mins a few times a day. I use the soft Milk Bone treats and break them up small and for each sit or even lay down she does i give her a small piece. I play with her, throw toys for her, and i take her for walks quite often.

I'm looking into classes of some sort. The only one I've seen so far in our town ( Williams Lake BC) is a protection trainer. I emailed him and asked if he does do obedience and if not , if you can point me in the right direction.
 

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Okay..so you need to be looking at the CAPPDT website..I typed in Williams lake and got the name Willow Eyford. She does all levels of obedience, behaviour mod and service dog training..not sure what her methods are but most likely positive methods. If you go to the website, use "search for a trainer" and enter your town and province it will give you members in that area.

Having a trainer to bounce questions off of will make a big difference for you and your frustration levels.

And good luck with the BF. Those men folk can be hard to train..lol. The fact that he acquiesced with the dog thing to "make you happy or shut you up" means he needs to be told to "man up". He wants respect? He needs to show it.
 

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Welcome to the wonderful world of puppy owning!

As I am currently raising my very first puppy/dog, I can definitely feel your pain. Despite doing years of research and making sure I knew what I was getting myself into, sometimes, I would feel so frustrated I wanted to curl up in a ball in give up, and there truly were a few times where I thought about sending my pup back. Granted, those were always fleeting thoughts that occurred when I felt just too stressed, but it's true. I had a lot of expectations and invested a lot in him, but when he started teething and really acting up...

I'm only a high school student, with volunteer work, clubs, sports, and the thought of a social life to juggle. Top that off with extra college courses, AP classes, college applications, scholarship applications, internships, and my job, there were times when I just wanted to plumb give up.

However, I (thankfully) did not do either and just went on working and training my pup. I realized I had made a commitment, and I was going to go through with it. After all, this is what I had wanted and asked for! I guess it must have just been a phase, because now my Trent is ALMOST an angel and being better than I could have imagined. He's being a dream puppy, and now that I look back, I put blame on my impatience and inexperience and laugh at the torn up $200 textbooks, shredded $150 jeans, and chewed up and bleeding arms. It's really all in the experence of raising a puppy, and I wouldn't trade it for anything in the world. Consistency, patience, hard work, and a lot of love and perseverance really pays off.

My baby Trent may be 5 months old, but he's already the center of my world and my pride and joy, as cheesy as that may sound. :D
 

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Hey AnimalCrazy20,

Welcome to the forum from a fellow Brittany owner!

Like you, my Britt was my first dog. Libby is now almost 2, and is very calm and well-behaved. Unlike you, my DH is on board with the training and such...

Britts are fantastic dogs, but they do need consistent exercise and well-defined boundaries. Read up on NILIF (there is a sticky in the training forum)... it is fantastic!

When Libby was a pup, she was also a nipper. Being our first dog, we were really unsure about how to go about fixing this behaviour. We started out teaching her not to mouth by using the "yelp" technique, which did work for a while, but then the yips ceased to interrupt the behaviour. We then started the "ignore and walk away" method, which also worked really well for a while... she started to nip at our legs and feet as we ignored her, or bit our heels as we left the room. Out of desparation we tried crating her (didnt work at all), and even tried grabbing her muzzle a few times like you did, but we were really not comfortable doing that, so we stopped. We were also teaching her "gentle" (lick our hand), "drop it" and "leave it" at this point to try to help, but when she was ramped up, it didn't matter. We were already walking her 3 times a day plus puppy classes, socialization, training around the house, and playing with her throughout the day, so a lack of exercise was ruled out.

At this point Libby was approaching 6 months of age, and we were getting desperate. We decided to try either shaking a can of pennies as an interrupter, or using a squirt bottle. We already knew that Libby wasn't timid of loud noises, but we didn't want her to become afraid of water, so we went with the penny jar. I took a small glass jam jar and put 5 pennies inside. I set it on the coffee table and waited until Libby got into a nippy mood. When she nipped, I grabbed the jar and gave it a good, solid shake. The sound stopped her in her tracks. She wasn't afraid of it, but she didn't like it, either, so it interrupted her enough to redirect. One week of this method and the nipping pretty much extinguished completely.

Now, I am not recommending that you do this right away. I'm just saying that you need to find what works for you and your dog. Your pup doesn't know it's doing something wrong... you have to teach your dog what it should do instead. Whatever you decide to try, stick with it for a few weeks before trying something else out. And try to eliminate all other problems - lack of training, exercise, stimulation. I have lots of tricks up my sleeve if you need some ideas!

And PLEASE post photos! I love Britt pics!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I just got off the phone with my BF(he's at work). He was talking with some guys at work and got thinking about what was bugging me ie; him not wanting the puppy, and the issues with the pup. We both agree we need to find something that works for us and Casey, and stick with it. Also both agree that after a couple weeks if she's still to much for us we're going to take her back to the breeder, so she can find her forever/right home. We don't want this to go to long, as we don't feel it's right that if it's just not working, to keep her here. She deserves to be happy.


Glad to know though that I'm not the only one who feels/felt this way. I love Casey and I want it to work. We're going to try tiring her out more and playing more with her to keep her from biting.
 

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Sounds like you are making progress on all fronts. You are clearly a caring person who wants to do it right. Another thought about training might be a Pet Quarters or some kind of chain store. They often either offer classes (maybe not perfect but betetr than nothing) or your local Humane Society. The shelters in my area all offer classes so maybe they do that in your area too.

I wish you luck with puppy and boyfriend. Hard to say which one is tougher to train....jk
 

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I know exactly how you feel..

I am a full time working mother, I have a a 2 year old and an 8 year old. A 9 week old pomeranian puppy and a spouse who wants NOTHING to do with him.

My little one is biting at the moment to. (Yesterday he bit my thumb and drew blood in three places). I believe he didn't mean to. I believe he's still working on his bite. I believe however though that he was tellng me to "put him down" and I didn't listen.

In the same sense they are very similar to children. Has your three year old pulled your hair to get your attention? Has your little one ever hit you when she was angry or bite you? Ok well my little one does and she's only two :p. Her talking is improving however her communication is still limited, and she does these things when she's trying to tell me something.

Its the same with my Aiko. If I am doing something he doesn't like. He lets me know, and with limited communicaton he resorts to growls, barks, and bites. Give your puppy some space to play. That helps mine. Being cuddled pisses him off!! haha.

He will one day grow out of the "I wanna play" "I wanna play" "I wanna play" and mellow out a bit. Just think of your little one going through their... "terrible 2's, 3's, and 4's"?
 

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Dont be too quick to give up. If you are willing to put in the effort, it is possible to have a SO thats not involved (or not very involved), kids and a well behaved puppy/dog.

My husband spends maybe 10 hours a week with our 5 month old Saint Bernard, he's taken the puppy out to potty fewer than 10 times in 3 months, brushed him maybe twice, I cant think of a meal he's given the pup and he's never picked up poop or cleaned up a "lake" (Saints dont do anything small!). All 4 of my girls are too small to do much beyond playing, trick training, feeding treats and the occasional meal. My puppy outweighs 3 of my girls by 30-40lbs, and only has about 5lbs to go before he outweighs my 11 year old. That leaves me doing the majority of the "puppy chores". This does not bother me in the least.

I knew before we decided to even look at a puppy that my husband already has a very limited amount of time at home, the majority of that he devotes to our 4 girls. I knew if I wanted him to continue devoting the same amount of time to the girls, I'd be doing the majority of the work with the pup. I didnt go into this thinking about getting a family dog or a dog for the kids, I wanted a dog for ME, a fuzzy body to trip over every time I turn around :p Being my puppy gives Buster some protection also, if the kids arent playing nice they arent allowed to play with MY puppy. I get to decide what food and treats he's given...with him having a food allergy, it is very important to me that I control what he's fed.

Have I done everything right? No :eek: I spent far too much time watching "The Dog Whisperer". I admit to alpha rolling Buster and "biting" (with my hand). The problem was I wasnt getting the same results, instead of getting a more confident, well behaved puppy, my boy was getting more fearful and biting/nipping more. Then I had a light bulb moment, I read that in a wolf pack the animals use force ONLY when intending to kill the animal they roll. I realized I was telling my sweet, sensitive puppy I intended to kill him. That day I put an end to Buster being rolled, I simply wont allow it. I taught the kids to "yelp" when he nipped, if that didnt work they were to leave the room. It worked! It took some time, but it did work. Buster is still a mouthy puppy but he's no longer causing pain or leaving marks.

Find what motivates Casey. You can use that to teach pretty much anything.

I have a VERY food motivated boy, he'll do anything for a treat. He learned "sit" before his first vet visit at 10 weeks, "down" shortly after that, "roll over" within a couple weeks, "leave it" and "drop it" (both VERY useful skills) within the first month. I taught him "gimme paw" a couple weeks ago in a matter of 2-3 minutes...each time his paw was in my hand he got to lick a peanut butter filled Kong.
 

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I can see where you're coming from. Sometimes my fiance tries, but not all the time, and we have 2 dogs.. an almost 4 month old Papillon puppy, and a 14 month old Pap. Roxy, is nothing compared to my big boy. He was my devil dog..but we taught him not to bite early, and he will no longer make any teeth to skin contact..which is essential with my big family that has a ton of kids. Roxy is still being a puppy nipper..but not hard enough to break skin anymore, and she kind of suckles on the finger after she's bit it and got it in her mouth..Kind of weird..but hey..lol

Gizmo caught on to everything quickly, and still does. He's the type of dog that can learn something new in just a matter of minutes. He was nippy when we first got him..He got my hands a couple of times pretty good..those puppy teeth are so sharp! lol... So we started working with him on it, he bit my hand..even just barely..and I yelped like a puppy, then started whining..and turned away from him..completely ignoring him.. and I did it EVERY time he made any teeth to skin contact..until he learned that doing so hurt me, and stopped play time, and he didn't like it very much! Maybe that's something you could try? Because as another poster said, the pup now only knows your hand coming to his face as painful, and doesn't want it anywhere near him!
 
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