Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just recently found a dog and have been holding her for the legal 7 day period (trying VERY hard to find her owners). It's not looking good about an owner coming forward, so my next step of concern is her manners and listening skills. She's young (approximately 1-1.5 years old) and will not listen to much. She's got no "key words" as I call them (my personal dogs always perk up when I say words such as 'ball,' 'walk,' 'dinner,' etc.). She does not respond to "come" whatsoever (which I find very frustrating. I have been using small treat rewards every time I get her to 'come' which has seemed to help only a small amount.

Now that she has gotten much needed rest, food, and water, her puppy curiosity and teeth are getting the best of her. She's a large dog (approximately 70 lbs) so having her chew something up = a large mess and having her play with her mouth = pain. She doesn't seem like she has been disciplined at all and does not react to the word 'no' or 'bad dog' etc. She doesn't understand that what she did was wrong.

I guess what I'm trying to get ideas on is effective ways to:

1- get her to begin listening and responding to my voice commands
2- "teething" techniques (maybe some toys that she could sink her teeth into rather than find chewing items up as fun)

Any suggestions would greatly be appreciated!

Thanks ahead of time :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,765 Posts
First, dogs never understand that what they did is "wrong" (they don't have a human moral system), only that you don't like it. And for them to care whether you don't like something, you have to establish a good relationship. Which takes time and effort. Don't use harsh punishment, don't be impatient.

Also, dogs don't understand words until you teach them what those words mean. So keep giving her treats to reinforce Come, lots and lots of repetition is the key. Never give a command if you can't be sure she'll do it (like, don't say come unless she's on a rope until it's well-engrained, etc.). Are there any training classes in your area? That could really help.

Toys! Kongs, Go-nuts, Nylabone, and Orka toys are good for chewing. Ropes are good for playing tug.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,186 Posts
You have to teach her the commands. Clicker training is great, you should try it. Look up kikopup on youtube. She's fantastic at it. Once you pick up the technique, it's just a matter of repetition. It takes a dog hundreds of successful repetitions to really know a command.

Recall is, again, repetition. Just make sure you never use recall for anything bad- don't ever call a dog to you for punishment or anything she doesn't like, such as nail trimmings or ear inspections or baths. Don't use recall to end fun times, like running around at the dog park. Call her to you, then release her to have fun again. You need to make coming to you hugely rewarding, every single time.

As for the teething, she's just never been taught bite inhibition. Whenever she bites you, yelp as loudly as you can and turn away from her for 20 seconds. When she chews on something she shouldn't, replace it with a toy and praise her for chewing on the toy. Manage the environment by keeping things out of her reach, like putting shoes in the closet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,385 Posts
Agreed. Train her like you would a new, young puppy... starting with her name, how to take treats, and Sit... then go from there.
What breed do you think she is?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Try not to be frustrated with your dog, her chewing problem can be due to many things for example... Lonliness, separation anxiety, teething or a fear/phobia.
If it is lonliness, make sure your dog maintains a certain level of stimulation otherwise he'll get into all sorts of mischief.
If it is separation anxiety, the best cure for that is to make your exits as low key as possible so that your dog won't be too stressed.
If it is teething, give your dog something to chew on to numb the pain such as a chew toys or treats. A great tip is to freeze his chew toy before offering it to him, this will allow him to relieve his teething pain AND distract him from chewing anything else. Bitter chewing-deterrent spray is another method to prevent your dog from chewing. Simply spray on whatever your dog is chewing, whether it is an object or his leg. Having this bad, bitter taste will probably be enough to eliminate future chewing.
If it is a fear or a phobia, this is the time when your dog needs your love and support the most. So do not punish your dog and get him scared and upset because this will just increase his chewing. Instead, try to track down what he is afraid of and hide it.
Visit http://dogobedienceadvisor.com/stop-beagle-barking/stop-dog-chewing/ for more information on how to deal with your dog's chewing problem.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top