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i had a person tell me this "story" a while ago about them "having tracked a couple of wolves in Maine and coming upon the whole pack in a meadow....they sat down in a area a bit away and just sat and observed. after a bit some of the pups came up to them and then a few moments later they felt eyes on them, turned around and the mother was standing behind them. after a bit of time, she "bumped" them and them wandered off, pups in tow."

now, from what little bit i have studied about wolves, this is not even remotely the way a pack would behave......am i wrong? i've never heard of wolves being quite that easy to find, for one, and 2 not being quite that "social"
 

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This is what I can find on wolves in Maine:

Wolves were extirpated from Maine by the 1890s. Small populations persisted in northeastern Minnesota and northern Michigan. Since the 1980s, populations have greatly expanded in the Great Lakes region and northern Rockies, and gray wolves have been reintroduced into the Yellowstone region, Idaho, Arizona, and New Mexico. Gray wolves persist across Canada, and in eastern Canada are found as far south as the north shore of the St. Lawrence River in Quebec. Although often thought of as a "wilderness" species, the gray wolf occupies many habitats, and in many areas demonstrates tolerance to human activities.
As to whether that person actually saw wolves or not, I don't know. How does this jive with his story?

Gray wolves are social animals and live in family groups or packs of 2-8 individuals, though some packs contain 20 or more members. Packs usually consist of parents (a single alpha pair), their offspring, and other non-breeding adults. Wolves begin to breed when they are 2-3 years old, sometimes establishing lifelong mates. Depending on latitude, females breed between January and April. The estrous period lasts 5-7 days, and gestation is 63 days. Litters average 6 pups, but may range between 1 and 11. The alpha female remains with the pups while the lead male and other members of the pack hunt and feed them. When the pups are 8-10 weeks old, they are moved from the den to a "rendezvous site," where they remain while pack members hunt. A succession of rendezvous sites are used until the fall, when the pups are almost full grown and begin to accompany adults on hunts.

From late April to late fall, the wolf pack restricts its wanderings to small areas centered on the den and pups. After the pups abandon their rendezvous sites, the pack wanders widely. Summer home ranges in forested areas may be 3-10 square miles, while winter ranges are much larger. Often, after 1-2 years of age, a young wolf may disperse from the pack and travel up to 500 miles in search of a new home.
ETA:

it is highly unlikely that wolves can naturally recolonize Maine. Experience from recovering populations in the Great Lakes and the West demonstrates that dispersing wolves must be protected to establish populations. Uncertainty about which subspecies of wolf occurred in Maine in the past, and whether wolf genes occur in Maine's coyote population, are questions that must be considered before developing plans for wolf recovery.
Looks like there are no wolves in Maine, though he could have seen coyotes.
 

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306199_292911880801428_525090866_n.jpg 579695_292913267467956_2018705707_n.jpg 551124_253798471379436_1530289734_n.jpg I find this VERY hard to believe. Wolves are very timid around people. Not change that the family would be able to even get close to the wolf cubs.

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