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Discussion Starter #1
Has there ever been a confirmed determination on whether eating garlic is harmful or helpful to dogs?

I know that this debate has been going on for quite a while now, and with the financial crisis' of the world today and the expensive prices of flea/tick meds (...aside from the fact that our own family has three cats and three dogs to treat), garlic seems like an easier way to ensure that fleas don't bother our animals. Additionally, I've read that garlic prevents worms (like tapeworms which dogs can get from fleas) and can help a dog's heart.

So that all brings the question of whether it is truly safe to use garlic. Maybe I've asked this question before... I forget. Either way, I'd like a safe and natural way to get rid of fleas in my household. Because without the fleas, there will also be no worms (which I believe my dogs now have >.<).

So first of all, I'd like to know everyone's take on this. Secondly, I'd like to know of any garlic "recipes" in which to safely administer garlic to a dog. And lastly... would it also help to externally apply the garlic? As in, spraying it on the dog's coat? Thanks!!
 

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First of all, knowing my dog now has worms too... I feel your pain, Eyssa!

As for Garlic, I know of the debate going on as well... I've heard of it doing just as much good as harm.

Did you know, at Wal-Mart mind you, they sell Brewer's Yeast Garlic? For skin and coat? I believe them to be a vitamin supplement of sorts and tried them for about a week when I first got Donnie, I thought it would help rid him of his bald spots, but sadly enough no.

I just threw out the bottle the other day because of all the uncertainty surrounding Garlic and dogs...

I read somewhere online that someone actually sprinkles Garlic Powder on their dogs' food... Umm... Not sure if that's safe, let alone if it tastes good to the dogs! lol!

I hope you(we) get answers soon! : D
 

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Apple Cider Vinegar is a much safer approach to holistic insect control for your dogs, plus it has a ton of other benefits. Look it up sometime, it's a pretty interesting thing.
 

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Apple Cider Vinegar is a much safer approach to holistic insect control for your dogs, plus it has a ton of other benefits. Look it up sometime, it's a pretty interesting thing.
I put it in my dogs water. Also, I heard somewhere (maybe on this forum) that a solution of white vinegar and water (50/50), sprayed on the dogs coat is helpful. I got the white vinegar the other day so we can try it.

I'm not buying flea meds anymore...For the last 2 years...they haven't done squat in the way of helping keep the fleas down...I'm done with them.

I've never given garlic to my dogs because of the uncertainty of safety. As for worms, I give them monthly heartworm meds...it acts as a general de-wormer as well. Eddie has only had worms once and that was when he first arrived here and Uallis has never had worms; I assume because of the meds. My cats have had worms several times though.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
deege39

Re: Fleas, worms, and garlic?
First of all, knowing my dog now has worms too... I feel your pain, Eyssa!

As for Garlic, I know of the debate going on as well... I've heard of it doing just as much good as harm.

Did you know, at Wal-Mart mind you, they sell Brewer's Yeast Garlic? For skin and coat? I believe them to be a vitamin supplement of sorts and tried them for about a week when I first got Donnie, I thought it would help rid him of his bald spots, but sadly enough no.

I just threw out the bottle the other day because of all the uncertainty surrounding Garlic and dogs...

I read somewhere online that someone actually sprinkles Garlic Powder on their dogs' food... Umm... Not sure if that's safe, let alone if it tastes good to the dogs! lol!

I hope you(we) get answers soon! : D
I believe I did see something at Walmart called ProPet... we got some of the skin health (in liquid form) supplements, but not the garlic... I, like you, was afraid it would do something to the dogs. And yeah, I'm a little iffy on the garlic powder theory. I've also seen that people put RAW cloves of garlic in their dogs' food! Others say never to feed your dogs raw garlic, but to cook it first... ugh, I'm so confused! But yes, I hope answers come soon! : D I really hate my animals suffering from those pesky little critters, and the worms just make my skin crawl. :-S

trumpetjock

Re: Fleas, worms, and garlic?
Apple Cider Vinegar is a much safer approach to holistic insect control for your dogs, plus it has a ton of other benefits. Look it up sometime, it's a pretty interesting thing.
Now there's a thought. I actually saw a few things on apple cider vinegar (and I believe we have some around the house), but for some reason I didn't pay much attention to it. It doesn't seem to be getting the same amount of debate as garlic, so I might just have to try that... tonight, even! Thank you for the suggestion!

EDIT: Eh, my father has just reminded me that it probably wouldn't be the best thing for my ten-year-old's stomach, to give her either garlic or vinegar. Do you think it would cause any stomach upset? She's very sensitive with that sort of thing, and lately (probably in part to the worms and her grass-eating habits) she's been vomiting.
 

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I believe I did see something at Walmart called ProPet... we got some of the skin health (in liquid form) supplements, but not the garlic... I, like you, was afraid it would do something to the dogs. And yeah, I'm a little iffy on the garlic powder theory. I've also seen that people put RAW cloves of garlic in their dogs' food! Others say never to feed your dogs raw garlic, but to cook it first... ugh, I'm so confused! But yes, I hope answers come soon! : D I really hate my animals suffering from those pesky little critters, and the worms just make my skin crawl. :-S
Feeding your dog garlic is a gamble, no matter how you look at it. Garlic (cooked or uncooked) is toxic to your dog. Period. It is in a small enough dose if you're only giving it once a week that it won't hurt them, but it is still toxic.
 

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For fleas and worms, I do a multi-pronged attack myself. Everything I read and hear says that garlic in low doses is more beneficial than harmful. It has both antioxidants and the bug repelling feature. I feed a supplement daily that is wayyyyyyy below the toxicity levels (found listed that it is 1 tsp fresh garlic per 10 lbs to be toxic).

First step: Feed a high quality food that meshes well with your dog's system. This is the first step to making their immune system strong. My dog had lived on a farm for 5 months and then been exposed to an infested dog for 2 months before she got fleas because a new food I tried was completely wrong for her. She reacted to the food, and a week later she was infested. If your dog is sensitive to food changes, don't change foods during flea season unless it's a big upgrade and the current food is not working well.

Second: I use diatomaceous earth in my household carpet. Pet grade (this is the brand my holistic vet sells: http://www.naturalanimal.com/ ) can be dusted on carpets, bedding, the pet itself, and ingested to kill worms. Also can be used outside for slugs, but is only effective against fleas when dry (rain has to dry off to be effective again).

Third: Nematodes are a natural predator to fleas. Use on outdoor infestations.

Fourth: Herbal shampoos/essential oils. Warning: do not use essential oils on cats! Cedar, citronella, neem, eucalyptus, orange, rosemary, and several other oils/herbals are great against fleas. I'm fond of Ark Natural's "Neem Protect" spray and shampoo, Touch of Mink's "3 in 1 Pet Shampoo", and Snook's (www.snookdog.com) "Herbal Shampoo" and "Flea Tea Dip". On dogs, you can even get away with applying the essential oils on the back of the shoulder blades, but do research on any necessary dilutions.

Fifth: Lastly, I supplement the diet. My dog gets a daily supplement by the aforementioned Snook's. It's a blend of garlic powder, brewer's yeast, rosehips, and kelp. Her ration of this mix as a 70 lb dog is about 1/4 tsp. Very low dose. She has been on this for about 5 months with no problem. I have customers at my store and friends that have used it for years. I think that garlic in a low dose to repel is far less toxic than any chemical that kills fleas.


All of these methods promote a healthy immune system. Applying chemicals and insecticides only kick an already down immune system. I tend to only recommend Frontline or Advantage as a one month barrier while you get your dog's health in order, but some of these natural steps should work in place of those toxic products.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ah, this is where the debate gets tricky. Everyone has different opinions, and I'm just plain confused. :p

trumpetjock
Re: Fleas, worms, and garlic?

Feeding your dog garlic is a gamble, no matter how you look at it. Garlic (cooked or uncooked) is toxic to your dog. Period. It is in a small enough dose if you're only giving it once a week that it won't hurt them, but it is still toxic.
See, that's what I was thinking... but what's the difference between giving them some type of poison (because that's what it is) like Frontline, Advantage, and de-wormers and giving them something that is natural... like garlic? Especially if both are toxic and both can be dangerous to the dog.

poodleholic
Re: Fleas, worms, and garlic?

Garlic doesn't work to repel fleas, anyway.

Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth DOES work, and it's a natural wormer, as well.

Read about it here: http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/wh...roduct.html#DE
Hm, one of my aunt's friends says that they feed their German Shepherds garlic (only garlic as a supplement, no others that I'm aware of) and they haven't had a flea problem since. I'll check out that link, though. Thanks!

c-parrish
Re: Fleas, worms, and garlic?

Second: I use diatomaceous earth in my household carpet. Pet grade (this is the brand my holistic vet sells: http://www.naturalanimal.com/ ) can be dusted on carpets, bedding, the pet itself, and ingested to kill worms. Also can be used outside for slugs, but is only effective against fleas when dry (rain has to dry off to be effective again).

Fourth: Herbal shampoos/essential oils. Warning: do not use essential oils on cats! Cedar, citronella, neem, eucalyptus, orange, rosemary, and several other oils/herbals are great against fleas. I'm fond of Ark Natural's "Neem Protect" spray and shampoo, Touch of Mink's "3 in 1 Pet Shampoo", and Snook's (www.snookdog.com) "Herbal Shampoo" and "Flea Tea Dip". On dogs, you can even get away with applying the essential oils on the back of the shoulder blades, but do research on any necessary dilutions.

Fifth: Lastly, I supplement the diet. My dog gets a daily supplement by the aforementioned Snook's. It's a blend of garlic powder, brewer's yeast, rosehips, and kelp. Her ration of this mix as a 70 lb dog is about 1/4 tsp. Very low dose. She has been on this for about 5 months with no problem. I have customers at my store and friends that have used it for years. I think that garlic in a low dose to repel is far less toxic than any chemical that kills fleas.
Just wondering, aside from a holistic vet (and we don't have any around here, unfortunately) and the websites, is there any other place that you can buy those natural products that you have listed? I'd really like to try that, but I've always been iffy about buying online (a security paranoia, I guess)... And what do you think about ProPet supplements (with garlic and brewers yeast)? Would that have too much garlic in it, as compared to the product from Snooks? Walmart, unfortunately, is the only place around here that has anything similar to what you've described, and they're products are all generally... unresponsive. We also have a product called "Nature's Guardian"... don't know if you've ever heard of it, but it's a natural flea repellent that is sprinkled on the carpet and furniture and then swept off. Anyway, thanks for your response! That really gave me a great insight!



(As a side note, I tried some ACV in our dogs' water dish... Bambi didn't seem to mind, but Tori wouldn't touch it. Is there a way to disguise the taste?)
 

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Just wondering, aside from a holistic vet (and we don't have any around here, unfortunately) and the websites, is there any other place that you can buy those natural products that you have listed? I'd really like to try that, but I've always been iffy about buying online (a security paranoia, I guess)... And what do you think about ProPet supplements (with garlic and brewers yeast)? Would that have too much garlic in it, as compared to the product from Snooks? Walmart, unfortunately, is the only place around here that has anything similar to what you've described, and they're products are all generally... unresponsive. We also have a product called "Nature's Guardian"... don't know if you've ever heard of it, but it's a natural flea repellent that is sprinkled on the carpet and furniture and then swept off. Anyway, thanks for your response! That really gave me a great insight!

I'm afraid that Snook's is a local company for me in the Portland, Oregon area. Otherwise they are mostly only available online. I vouch for all of their products though! So if you were to make a larger order, I'm sure that shipping would be reasonable.

The diatomaceous earth that I linked you to (as well as the other products on that site) I have only seen at my vet's office. My store is presently trying to get some of those products in, but the company doesn't seem to want to work with us :(

Not to be advertising my employer, but I might be able to arrange something with the owner of the store I work at and we could ship products. Website for us is www.happy-healthypet.com, so you know that we are real. I would be able to get you any of the Snook's products, as well as the Ark Naturals.


As for the products you listed, ProPet shouldn't be a bad brand. It is made by Eight In One...probably the same or similar to their Excel line, but rebranded to be sold in large chain stores like Walmart, Fred Meyers, etc. However, when I was just giving my dog brewer's yeast and garlic tablets, I didn't find it as effective for some reason, possibly because it isn't formulated for fleas, but for skin and coat only (big companies are much more conservative about using a possible toxin...hence the reason Natura took garlic out of Innova and EVO pet foods).

The Seargent's "Nature's Guardian", again, is a rebranded product line. In many pet stores it is known as Sentry "Natural Defense". When I worked at a store that sold Natural Defense, it didn't sell well, but at the same time it was never returned. I imagine that it might work, but have never tried it. I don't think it would hurt to give it a try though, given your options.
 

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Fourth: Herbal shampoos/essential oils. Warning: do not use essential oils on cats! Cedar, citronella, neem, eucalyptus, orange, rosemary, and several other oils/herbals are great against fleas. I'm fond of Ark Natural's "Neem Protect" spray and shampoo, Touch of Mink's "3 in 1 Pet Shampoo", and Snook's (www.snookdog.com) "Herbal Shampoo" and "Flea Tea Dip". On dogs, you can even get away with applying the essential oils on the back of the shoulder blades, but do research on any necessary dilutions.
Just a note to be -very- careful with essential oils...

I used to use pennyroyal on my dog, very very diluted to keep fleas off, you can even grow it in your yard to keep fleas away. Works and is a member of the mint family so doesn't smell bad.. Many dog shampoos use it. Used it for years in shampoos and even made my own rinse for her. She lived happy and healthy past 16 years.

But straight pennyroyal oil or some other straight oil extracts of plants can be -fatal- very quickly if enough is applied to a dog's skin or ingested, and even moreso for cats, and it doesn't take much sometimes just a few drops. For that matter they can be fatal to you too.

http://csuvets.colostate.edu/pain/Articlespdf/Natural Approaches for Flea Control.pdf

As for Diatomaceous earth, I have never tried it on anything but Fire ants, if that works you might want to look into the pool store variety, many many pools use DE in the filter system and every pool store out there sells it by the box.
 

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...Exactly. I believe that most of the essential oils do have to be diluted. I have no personal experience using them as I have found other products that work well for my dog.

The nice thing about essential oils, in my opinion, is that if you have a hyper allergic dog, you can spot test and customize for your dog. Many herbal flea remedies use a "kitchen sink" approach to formulation, and a dog could have a reaction to just one of the 10 herbs included. How do you know which one? This way you can use just one, or a mixture, or even switch off between safe ones to prevent a development of allergies to what works.
 

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For fleas and worms, I do a multi-pronged attack myself. Everything I read and hear says that garlic in low doses is more beneficial than harmful. It has both antioxidants and the bug repelling feature. I feed a supplement daily that is wayyyyyyy below the toxicity levels (found listed that it is 1 tsp fresh garlic per 10 lbs to be toxic).

First step: Feed a high quality food that meshes well with your dog's system. This is the first step to making their immune system strong. My dog had lived on a farm for 5 months and then been exposed to an infested dog for 2 months before she got fleas because a new food I tried was completely wrong for her. She reacted to the food, and a week later she was infested. If your dog is sensitive to food changes, don't change foods during flea season unless it's a big upgrade and the current food is not working well.

Second: I use diatomaceous earth in my household carpet. Pet grade (this is the brand my holistic vet sells: http://www.naturalanimal.com/ ) can be dusted on carpets, bedding, the pet itself, and ingested to kill worms. Also can be used outside for slugs, but is only effective against fleas when dry (rain has to dry off to be effective again).

Third: Nematodes are a natural predator to fleas. Use on outdoor infestations.

Fourth: Herbal shampoos/essential oils. Warning: do not use essential oils on cats! Cedar, citronella, neem, eucalyptus, orange, rosemary, and several other oils/herbals are great against fleas. I'm fond of Ark Natural's "Neem Protect" spray and shampoo, Touch of Mink's "3 in 1 Pet Shampoo", and Snook's (www.snookdog.com) "Herbal Shampoo" and "Flea Tea Dip". On dogs, you can even get away with applying the essential oils on the back of the shoulder blades, but do research on any necessary dilutions.

Fifth: Lastly, I supplement the diet. My dog gets a daily supplement by the aforementioned Snook's. It's a blend of garlic powder, brewer's yeast, rosehips, and kelp. Her ration of this mix as a 70 lb dog is about 1/4 tsp. Very low dose. She has been on this for about 5 months with no problem. I have customers at my store and friends that have used it for years. I think that garlic in a low dose to repel is far less toxic than any chemical that kills fleas.


All of these methods promote a healthy immune system. Applying chemicals and insecticides only kick an already down immune system. I tend to only recommend Frontline or Advantage as a one month barrier while you get your dog's health in order, but some of these natural steps should work in place of those toxic products.
I have'nt any evidance that garlic works on prevention of flea infestation.

I did done some research on this vary subject. Did you know that the adult flea stage is only 20% of its life span. And a female flea can lay 10 to 30 eggs a day and live and live up to 40 days? Read more!
 

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I was given this natural remedy for fleas a while back, from someone who uses this method on her own dogs and swears by it.
I have yet to try it on my own dogs, as I stocked up on Advantage and still have some left. But I will be trying this when I run out.

Flea repellent: 2 lemons (cut into quarters) 3 cups boiling water, 2 tablespoons sweet almond oil, 10 drops lavender oil, 6 drops Cedarwood, 3 drops Tea Tree oil. In a jug, add lemon quarters and cover with boiling water. Let mix sit overnight. Next day remove lemon and add oils. Put in a spray bottle. Shake vigorously and spray all over your dog avoiding eyes.
 

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A friend of my mom with therapy dogs is getting us some Diatomaceous Earth. I like the idea of not using chemicals. But do not get the pool variety.
It's basically the shell of a tiny single cell sized organism.

Reading a few places the pool variety seems to have sharper crystalline edges, and is harmful to breath the dust, where food grade variety is duller edges less crystalline and poses less of a health threat when inhaled.

Wonder which kills bugs better or if they are the same effectiveness wise?
 

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It's basically the shell of a tiny single cell sized organism.

Reading a few places the pool variety seems to have sharper crystalline edges, and is harmful to breath the dust, where food grade variety is duller edges less crystalline and poses less of a health threat when inhaled.

Wonder which kills bugs better or if they are the same effectiveness wise?
I did quite a bit of reading before starting our dogs on it. The food grade is completely safe and also just as effective. It is actually found in a lot of human vitamins. Supposedly, it is safe for birds, small animals, dogs, cats, people...
 

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I use a supplement from a company called Springtime, Inc. called Bug-off Garlic. It comes in powder and chewable form. I use the chews. I also use their other chewables for joints, vits. and stress-relief. But they have a more concentrate supplement (powder form only) that has everything in it for joints, vits. and also has dimataceous (spelling?) earth in it. It's called Longevity. I tried it once, but my dogs didn't like it in their food. So, I'm sticking with the chewables. I have trust in these supplements. I have heard of no problems from anyone using the Bug-off Garlic and IMO it works fine for insect control as well as a health benefit. This company could not be in business if toxicity was an issue!
 

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Beware!! The pool variety of diatomaceous earth in poison and toxic!!!! Only use "food grade" for the cure of worms and fleas.
 
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