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To start off, both my husband and I were raised with dogs. In fact, my husband's family still has dogs, so we still get exposure when we visit. It has been 5 years since my husband has lived with dogs and over 10 since I have.

With that background, we both love dogs and are looking to get two dogs. My husband would like to get puppies so we can ensure they are socialized fully to the very specific things we want them to be comfortable with (ex: farm animals, horses, hunting, bows and arrows, fireworks, city life as well as country life). I'm a little nervous about raising puppies for the first time (I've only had rescues) and have been researching and watching puppy training videos as I really want to do this right. When the time comes to get them, I plan to take up to a year off from working to devote to raising them.

My question is this, should we get both puppies at once or get one puppy, raise it for a few years then get the next one and have the first puppy be a good example to the new puppy. The breed my husband wants is a harder to train breed, while the breed I want us easy to train. We plan to get one of each but if we get one first, we will get my puppy first so it can be the good example. My husband's family had found this method to work well with their dogs.

But the flip side of the coin (getting both together or around the same time), would allow both puppies to have more puppy interaction which I read is very good for learning not to nip or bite and allows them to have a companion when I need to run to the grocery store or any other scenario where they would otherwise be home alone. What are your thoughts? Which scenario would be more beneficial? Can you think of any other reasons, one method would be more beneficial than the other? Also, how old would the first puppy need to be before we got the second puppy if we use the first puppy as a good example? I don't want the first puppy to be the one learning new habits or to be influenced by the second puppies behavior.
 

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Definitely not two at the same time. Google littermate syndrome, it's not good news.

With 2 puppies it's actually also triple the work because you have to do everything with each one as an individual, and also with them both together.

I would definitely recommend getting one, waiting until that dog is trained to a degree that is acceptable for you, and then getting a 2nd if that's what you want.
 

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To start off, both my husband and I were raised with dogs. In fact, my husband's family still has dogs, so we still get exposure when we visit. It has been 5 years since my husband has lived with dogs and over 10 since I have.

With that background, we both love dogs and are looking to get two dogs. My husband would like to get puppies so we can ensure they are socialized fully to the very specific things we want them to be comfortable with (ex: farm animals, horses, hunting, bows and arrows, fireworks, city life as well as country life). I'm a little nervous about raising puppies for the first time (I've only had rescues) and have been researching and watching puppy training videos as I really want to do this right. When the time comes to get them, I plan to take up to a year off from working to devote to raising them.

My question is this, should we get both puppies at once or get one puppy, raise it for a few years then get the next one and have the first puppy be a good example to the new puppy. The breed my husband wants is a harder to train breed, while the breed I want us easy to train. We plan to get one of each but if we get one first, we will get my puppy first so it can be the good example. My husband's family had found this method to work well with their dogs.

But the flip side of the coin (getting both together or around the same time), would allow both puppies to have more puppy interaction which I read is very good for learning not to nip or bite and allows them to have a companion when I need to run to the grocery store or any other scenario where they would otherwise be home alone. What are your thoughts? Which scenario would be more beneficial? Can you think of any other reasons, one method would be more beneficial than the other? Also, how old would the first puppy need to be before we got the second puppy if we use the first puppy as a good example? I don't want the first puppy to be the one learning new habits or to be influenced by the second puppies behavior.
Personally I'd never recommend having two puppies at the same time, especially not the same age and litter unless there's two people who can separate them for training purposes. You'll just end up with two dogs who will likely wrestle rather than listening to anything you have to say. The 1yo stage is particularly quite hardcore even with just one pup so two dogs who haven't "forgotten" how to do recall will be a nightmare IMO.

Personally I'd recommend around 18 months minimum to follow up with another dog. It gives time to work out any kinks in training.

For socialising go to a puppy class with play time, even if you know how to teach all the tricks the socialising and learning to settle and listen around all the other pups is invaluable. You can also try Day care as well.
 

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Do not get two puppies at the same time. Doing it correctly is an insane amount of work (even one puppy is an insane amount of work). You would need to separate them for walks and training purposes, plus doing things together, so it's basically three times the work of one. And there have been studies where guide dog puppy raisers tried this (they should know what they are doing) and one of the puppies pretty much always washed out for temperament issues. No matter how hard you try, typically one puppy ends up pushy and "dominant" (not the right word, but I can't think of how else to describe it) while the other ends up more timid and quiet. My family had littermates when I was growing up and I saw this first hand.

And then there are bigger issues beyond just not becoming the best dogs they can be. Some will begin to fight once they reach maturity. And some are so bonded that they can't be separated for vet visits or anything else without freaking out. And they typically are more interested in each other than in their humans so they can be hard to train and bond with. They sort of become their own pack and you are left out.

Get one puppy, and when that puppy is a couple years old get another. I personally would not get a puppy until I felt my adult dog was "trained" and an adult. Definitely not before 2 years old, but that's my preference. Getting a puppy adds a lot of chaos and previously well behaved dogs tend to regress. Regression in a 5 year old will be mild compared to regression in a 1 year old who is still an adolescent.
 

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I agree with the previous posters - two at the same time would be overwhelming. I have a 10 week old Great Dane puppy, and he is fairly mellow for his age, and it is still overwhelming.

Out of curiosity, what breeds are both you and your husband interested in?
 

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My friend and I each have a Cavalier puppy, mine is 8 months old and hers is 7 months. I love both dogs and they love each other. However they are more than a handful when they get together. We spent 3 weeks in NC this summer with them and I can say it was an experience.
 

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It is more then doable to have two at the same time but it is a lot of work to do. It is really better to have one for a year to 1 1/2 then add another. I can tell you that it is indeed 3x the work (sometimes even more)as I have two that are 3 1/2 months apart. I do things with them together all the time but they also go to 2 different classes on different days and are not crated together.

My recommendation is that if you are committed to doing 3 of everything then go and get two if not then just get one since you can add another puppy once the other is older.
 

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it's doable for two puppies at the same time.. litter mate syndrome is true.. when puppies are left with nothing else but each other... Like when people get puppies and put them out in the back yard with no interaction for them. You and your DH being prepared to focus in on one of the pups each, to help with their individual development "that makes a difference" raising two well balanced individuals.....

Main things to think about is it's double for everything.. double the poop and pee,, double the keeping an eye on them during potty training , double the clean up if accidents happen.. If they barkers or whiners or chewers that is double too. What ever one puppy can do,, just double it.. Not having a dog, for a while or never raising a puppy can be a real shocker to realize some pups are a whole lot of work , they go through growing phases... there could be resource guarding, could go through a period of sibling rivalry scuffles when they hit adolescents..

all do able stuff ... having the mind set to work through that first 2 years for teaching how to live in your home and with each other.. is what makes the difference.. hopefully they bond and learn to work with each other from your guidance that they will be the best of buddies their entire life time.. I had a larger group of dogs that did well. as a group.. The newer breeds I chose are more independent and not so easy as specific individuals to get along with each other. another thing to consider when choosing you breed of choice.

yes doable, but not guaranteed.. even one pup is not guaranteed on how they finish out as an adult until you get there.. It's a chance all dog owners take but accept. Dog people truly love the adventure and the Journey with their dogs...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you everyone for your feedback. I will definitely wait to get the second puppy until the first puppy is well trained and at least 18 months old (probably closer to two years).

Out of curiosity, what breeds are both you and your husband interested in?
My husband wants an English Pointer and I want a Standard Poodle.
 

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One at a time.
Makes life easier for all.
 
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