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Hello,
So I am new to owning a puppy especially a corgi ( I grew up with dogs), the corgi is named Winston. He is around 7 months old,ive had him since 13 weeks and i took him to puppy classes etc so ive been ontop of my game when it comes to him. Hes pretty good when it comes to most thing but he seems to bite alot (the wrists) when someone new is at the house. Im not sure how to go about disobeying him, ive tried spraying my the wrists with bitter apple spray and yelling no.

I was really wondering if this is normal for a corgi when they are in their early puppy stage (the biting - herding?) and if he will just grow out of it. He also cant seem to walk downstairs but i think thats jut cause hes afraid of them since its about 20 stairs down.

So
Is it normal -
For a corgi to bite the wrists alot out of excitment or playfulness? - He doesnt bite hard to where the person bleeds but it does get red and scratch the wrist etc. Should I try timeouts?
He still cant hold his pee for 8 hours( he pees once when Im at work so hes alone at home for around 8 hours) Is that just cause hes still tiny?
Any pointers or tips? Please Thank You!

Pic below for your enjoyment
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Corgwn are heeling dogs, so yes, using their teeth is very normal. Also, he's probably in the final stage of teething, where the adult teeth are "set" in their permanent formation. The fact that he is showing enough inhibition to not draw blood is good. If you don't want him mouthing you at all, then he needs to be taught that any time his teeth touch human skin, the fun stops and the human leaves. No yelping, yelling, or scolding. Just "teeth meet skin, human leaves". You only need to step out of the room for a few seconds before returning. If he doesn't get the message after a few tried, then just pop him in his crate for a time-out and maybe a nap. Tired puppies tend to be bitey puppies.

Stairs... twenty stairs is a lot when you are a dwarf breed puppy. Start with having him go up only one or two, and then coming back down. As his confidence grows, you can ask him for another , and then another. It might be a good idea to have him in a harness with a leash attached, so that you can support him coming down, which will also help with his confidence, since the risk of falling will be much lower.

As far as the peeing goes, my GSD was nearly two before she quite needing an early morning potty run. Her last outing before bedtime would be around midnight, and she would need to go out anywhere between 5:00 and 6:00, and we didn't normally get up until 7:30.
 

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LeoRose gave good advice. Yes, remember Corgis are herders and they use their teeth and their bark to make livestock move. They are mouthy. He's doing what he was bred to do. It is your job to teach him that he isn't supposed to do that to humans! When teeth meet human flesh, the human leaves and fun ends. Setting up baby gates is helpful for this so you can step over it and puppy can't get to you.

At 7 months old he's only kind of potty trained. He might get the idea, but not quite have the mental and physical capability to hold it. And yes, small dogs have small bladders.
 

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Corgwn are heeling dogs, so yes, using their teeth is very normal. Also, he's probably in the final stage of teething, where the adult teeth are "set" in their permanent formation. The fact that he is showing enough inhibition to not draw blood is good. If you don't want him mouthing you at all, then he needs to be taught that any time his teeth touch human skin, the fun stops and the human leaves. No yelping, yelling, or scolding. Just "teeth meet skin, human leaves". You only need to step out of the room for a few seconds before returning. If he doesn't get the message after a few tried, then just pop him in his crate for a time-out and maybe a nap. Tired puppies tend to be bitey puppies.

Stairs... twenty stairs is a lot when you are a dwarf breed puppy. Start with having him go up only one or two, and then coming back down. As his confidence grows, you can ask him for another , and then another. It might be a good idea to have him in a harness with a leash attached, so that you can support him coming down, which will also help with his confidence, since the risk of falling will be much lower.

As far as the peeing goes, my GSD was nearly two before she quite needing an early morning potty run. Her last outing before bedtime would be around midnight, and she would need to go out anywhere between 5:00 and 6:00, and we didn't normally get up until 7:30.
alright thank you, ill keep that in mind. its just frustrating because hes fine with me and mostly my roommate but when someone comes over he gets excited and jumps up at them and bites the wrist etc but from now on ill send him to his crate when he does it for a few minutes. hopefully eventually he gets the idea..
 

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LeoRose gave good advice. Yes, remember Corgis are herders and they use their teeth and their bark to make livestock move. They are mouthy. He's doing what he was bred to do. It is your job to teach him that he isn't supposed to do that to humans! When teeth meet human flesh, the human leaves and fun ends. Setting up baby gates is helpful for this so you can step over it and puppy can't get to you.

At 7 months old he's only kind of potty trained. He might get the idea, but not quite have the mental and physical capability to hold it. And yes, small dogs have small bladders.
alright thank you, ill keep that in mind. hope he catchs on..
 

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alright thank you, ill keep that in mind. its just frustrating because hes fine with me and mostly my roommate but when someone comes over he gets excited and jumps up at them and bites the wrist etc but from now on ill send him to his crate when he does it for a few minutes. hopefully eventually he gets the idea..
If you can get some friends who are willing to help out, you can get them to come over for training sessions where they also leave the room as soon as he starts to bite. Dogs don't generalize well, so you do have to repeat the training in different situations before they realize it applies all the time, everywhere, with everyone. And new visitors are extra exciting, so he's likely to be more nippy then. But if you have friends who you know will follow your instructions to the letter, they can help a lot with training him that biting makes the fun stop with everyone he meets.
 
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