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Hi, I am hoping someone can answer a few questions for me. We have been looking for a cane Corso for about 6 months. We have it narrowed down to two. We were originally looking for a black or gray one. Color wasn’t super important, but I don’t want to be scammed. One male is fawn with gray mask and has CC features but the one we liked his personality more the owner called it carbon fawn, he almost looks like a saddleback with golden looking eyes. Is this a normal quality in CC? Could he be mixed with something else? While I don’t really care if he’s mixed I also don’t want to think I’m paying for one thing and get something else. Thanks so much for any advice you can give me!
 

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You are correct in saying that color should be the least important consideration. The bigger questions are: What do they do with their dogs besides breed them? Are they registered with an organization like the AKC or UKC? Are they doing all the required health testing? Do they socialize their puppies, and expose them to a wide variety of things/places/people to ensure that they will have a good chance to grow into sane, happy dogs? Do they do their best to match you with the puppy that will best fit with your lifestyle?

The second dog may be a purebred Corso, but from your description, he has two disqualifying faults, which I've bolded below:

Eyes - Medium-size, almond-shaped, not round or bulging, tight fitting rims preferred with only a minimal amount of haw being visible. Eye color-Dogs with black muzzles (coat colors of black, fawn or red, and these colors brindled) dark brown eyes are preferred. Gray muzzles (coat colors of gray, fawn or red and these colors brindled), lighter shades are approved. Pigmentation of the eye rims is complete, pigmentation of eye rim matches pigment color of dog. Disqualification - Yellow bird of prey; blue eyes. E

Color: Acceptable colors are black, lighter and darker shades of gray, lighter and darker shades of fawn, and red. Brindling is allowed on all of these colors. Solid fawn and red, including lighter and darker shades, have a black or gray mask. The mask does not go beyond the eyes. There may be a white patch on the chest, throat, chin, backs of the pasterns, and on the toes. Disqualification - Any color with tan pattern markings as seen in black-and-tan breeds.

These are the color and marking names and codes that are used on the registration application. As you can see, "carbon fawn" isn't listed.

Colors
DESCRIPTIONSTANDARD COLORSREGISTRATION CODE
BlackCheck Mark For Standard Color007
Black BrindleCheck Mark For Standard Color279
Chestnut BrindleCheck Mark For Standard Color520
FawnCheck Mark For Standard Color082
GrayCheck Mark For Standard Color100
Gray BrindleCheck Mark For Standard Color107
RedCheck Mark For Standard Color140
Markings
DESCRIPTIONSTANDARD MARKINGSREGISTRATION CODE
Black MaskCheck Mark For Standard Mark004
Gray MaskCheck Mark For Standard Mark041


The national breed club will probably have a list of member breeders, as well as information about health, temperament. Cane Corso Association of America
 

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Thank you for the reply! Definitely good points that we have considered just don’t know. They are AKC and say they socialize, health guarantee...but do I actually know what they do with them? No. The parents fit all the descriptions you have put out but the puppy looks differently to me. He said the color is actually formentino but people call it carbon fawn. We do not plan on breeding or showing the dog, it will just be part of our family. While I have done my research on the breed I have only ever owned German Shepherds, so some of the terms are unfamiliar to me. They are very hard to find in our area and we will be driving 10 hours to pick this one up. So it’s not as much about qualifications or if I even care that it doesn’t fit the standard. But I want to know if he is coming from a good breeder and is actually full blood. I would suspect a byb doing the least amount for the most amount of money if they are breeding disqualified traits. Or could this just be a puppy that came out looking differently? The other pups all were fawn or black. He did not say the puppies eyes were gold, just in the picture they look golden or hazely to me but they could be a light brown I suppose. I googled what you called them and they are not that color.
 

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I would be very careful with choosing a Cane Corso breeder. They can be a difficult breed at best and if not socialized or bred properly, can be trouble. Keep in mind that things like fearfulness, separation anxiety, and even agrression can be passed down from the parents.
 

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They are AKC and say they socialize, health guarantee...but do I actually know what they do with them? No.
If they are showing and/or working their dogs, then they should be able to tell you what titles the dogs have, and show you proof of those titles. In fact, most people cango on at great length about their dog's titles, as well as other titled dogs in their pedigree. Anyone who give excuses like "conformation is just politics", they "don't have time to show or compete", or "know their dogs, so don't need to prove anything" are people to avoid.

They should also be showing you hard copies of any health testing results, like OFA certificates. You can also look up their results on the OFA website. Most good breeders can tell you the testing results of pretty much every dog in the first several generations. Anyone who "doesn't need to test for ____, because it isn't in my lines" is someone I would be extremely leery of, unless it is a DNA test where the dogs can be considered "clear by parentage" because of testing in previous generations.
 

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If they are showing and/or working their dogs, then they should be able to tell you what titles the dogs have, and show you proof of those titles. In fact, most people cango on at great length about their dog's titles, as well as other titled dogs in their pedigree. Anyone who give excuses like "conformation is just politics", they "don't have time to show or compete", or "know their dogs, so don't need to prove anything" are people to avoid.

They should also be showing you hard copies of any health testing results, like OFA certificates. You can also look up their results on the OFA website. Most good breeders can tell you the testing results of pretty much every dog in the first several generations. Anyone who "doesn't need to test for ____, because it isn't in my lines" is someone I would be extremely leery of, unless it is a DNA test where the dogs can be considered "clear by parentage" because of testing in previous generations.
Thank you so much for all the info! It’s been a long time since I had a puppy but everything you pointed out the breeders did with both my shepherds. I will try and get more info from the guy and see what happens. I can’t wait to find the puppy that’s right for our family!
 

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I'd wait and keep looking rather than take a chance if you can't get satisfactory answers to the questions LeoRose raised. Maybe a particular puppy is available to you because it is pet quality for reasons of coat pattern and eye color. For instance, in Rottweilers a puppy with a white spot or bird of prey eyes is considered pet quality no matter how well bred. Then again....

With a Cane Corso, my primary concern would be temperament. After that, I'd want to know the odds on soundness, which would come from parents and further back ancestors being free of things like hip and elbow dysplasia. Still, first I'd want to know the temperament on both parents and see how the puppy reacted to some of the things in the Puppy Aptitude Test. Even if the breeder doesn't do anything like that, you can do a few of the easier of these ways of handling when visiting to see a puppy 7 weeks old or older.

If you can get the registered names of the parents, you can get information on any AKC conformation or obedience titles from the AKC website and see what OFA tests have been submitted and their results. Grandparents matter too.
 

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As an owner of purebred cane corsos, if you were to buy either of these pups and the parents are registered with the AKC, then the litter should also be, and you'll get a puppy oack so you can register. In that pack is the family tree of the sire and dam, with their registration numbers, and it goes back several generations. So... if the breeder can't/ won't provide you with this information up front, find another breeder.

Additionally, if I remember correctly, having the saddle coloring is a disqualification. So, if he will answer your questions and you decide pob that pup, you won't be able to show or breed it (even if you weren't initially planning to). Because it's not show quality, you shouldn't pay show quality price. Reputable breeders know which pups are show quality and which aren't, and they are priced accordingly.

Corsos do have the same health concerns as other mastiff breeds, so make sure that the pups have gone through all of their health screenings. And make sure you can visit the kennel, and set how they were raised. Corsos need socialization from DAY 1, so a breeder who is very hands on with the pups is important!

Cane Corsos are not for 1st time owners, but since you've had Shepards, you have experience. Just know that the Corso is like other mastiffs but more so, if that makes sense. I grew up with Great Danes, and Corsos are a whole new level! I wouldn't trade them for the world, but they need consistent training and socialization from the start, as well as a strong alpha.

Make sure whichever pup you pick has the right personality to fit with your family and lifestyle.

If I may add my personal two cents: please leave the ears natural. It still conforms, and they are so much sweeter looking and more approachable that way. Additionally, with natural ears they are far less likely to be mistaken for a pitbull. There are thousands of amazing pitties out there, but since some states still ban them, naturally ears help with any potential confusion.

Do note: the Corso's bite strength is 3x that of a German Shepherd, stronger than an African Lion, and equal to that of a leopard or jaguar! So... socialization from the beginning is key! And I don't play tug-of-war with Corsos! Before they're a year old they can beat you, and you need to remain the alpha!

Anyway, sorry for my long post... I love my corsos, and wouldn't trade these sweet Italian pups for anything! They are huge cuddle monkeys and want to just hang with the family once they outgrow the puppy crazies. I hope you find the one of your dreams! :giggle:
 

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P. S. You can check to see if the breeder is registered with the AKC as well as the ICCF. Best of luck and let us know how it goes!
 

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P. S. You can check to see if the breeder is registered with the AKC as well as the ICCF. Best of luck and let us know how it goes!
The AKC doesn't register breeders.
 
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