Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello Group,
It has been a long HOT SUMMER in Texas, and a long wait until weather cooled enough to be able to get my Boz Shepherds tested. The Boz Shepherds are new to this side of the world, and have not been tested for this type of work in the USA. They are utilized to some extent in Turkey for this.



Although I felt they would have immediatley jumped into action, it seemed to puzzle them at first. Much socialization has been done to get them to accept crowds, and all types of people. This was their first testing, and the trainer was impressed. Two of the dogs were able to pull the sleeve from him several times.

It is still unclear if they have what it will take to function in this type of work, but I am encouraged by their first showing.

Below is a 18 month old female Geisha, and the other is a 1 year old male.






 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,153 Posts
What are they usually bred/trained for?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,220 Posts
I believe protocol is an "agitation test". The person in the bite suit/sleeve acts like a bad guy being menacing with that rubber stick thing they use in training.

But if you can't tell from my awesome use of jargon(rubber stick thing), I could be dead wrong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
731 Posts
What are they usually bred/trained for?
They are bred to be guardian dogs and mostly they protect livestock (sheep) in Turkey.

Monster Malak- glad they are doing well with their training. They're beautiful dogs. There's a breeder of them here in Nevada, but how rare are they in the US? When I googled out of curiousity- I see next to nothing on information about them. I've only heard about them and only know about the breeder by listing since I wanted to see what kinds of local breeders we have (I like to purchase more in a drivable distance next time).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
My intention for getting them Tested for Protection Work, is to find different venues of work for them to be utilized in. To many of our Working Breeds have gone soft from lack of proper selection. I will be placing as many as I can in the Livestock Guardian working roles. But their is a huge demand for Family Guardians and Protection Work.

The Boz Shepherds are still rare in the USA, or on this side of the world for that matter. Only 8 over here so far (Not counting one imported by a Kangal breeder, and being presented as a kangal). I will be bringing over a bred female from Turkey in the next weeks. Dev Nazli, 32.5 inches tall, and 155 pounds.
Their rarity is due to several reasons.
First,,, The religious strife in Turkey has created regions that have little to do with the people in areas next to them. With this has created isolated regions with their regional breeds of dogs. The Boz come from The Northern areas of the Urfa Mountains. It was not until 2003 that a breeder was able to travel to this region and purchase some of these dogs. He introduced them to most of Turkey, that was unaware of them. "There are many regional breeds in Turkey"
Second,,,, Exporting dogs out of Turkey has been illegal since 1986. This has limited the Worlds ability to get to know them. Recently, a way was found :) and now they are slowly making their way around the world.

The Breeder in Nevada has a GREAT young female out of one of the best Boz Shepherd females in Turkey, and Sefir, one of the best Sires,,, (he sold for $79,800 in Korea). Her pups mother is Dev Nazli, the female I will be bringing over,,,,, if everything goes well. Seems as if there is always a problem with shipping.... :(

Monster, my Daughter, and a Kangal Pup.

Geisha, 18 month old female.

Monster, a 12 month old male.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
I've had Great Pyranees, the real working type. Loved living with them as I never worried at all that they kept anything around at bay. If you're familiar with the Great Pyr, can you tell me how the Boz is alike or different in temperament, working ability/style? One of the problems we ran into with the Pyrs was boundaries. They wanted to work 6 farms as well as ours & it took a while to get those boundaries established.

We're considering moving & I won't be asking my Collie to guard the livestock & encounter wild hogs, mountain lion & bear... all critters that she's never seen here. She's a senior dog. One of the things I look at is how good are they with the small critters like tiny dogs, chickens, baby chicks, etc.. as well as being hard on the predators.

Lots of curiosity about your breed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I ran Great Pyrenees for 16+ years, with mixed success. May be I did not have the good ones also. But for me the Pyrenees would stand out at the Boundry and bark at the Coyote packs 100-200 yards away. It only kept the Packs just far enough away. Problem was when I would loose a dog, the constant checking of the Coyotes would present with a raid. So for 6-8 months, absolutaly no losses, then WHAM!!! When the Packs would join up to 15-25 coyotes, the Pyrenees would cave in, or get defeated.

The Turkish Breeds of LGDs are far more proactive,,,, otherwise, they cahse away the threat "1-2 miles", or kill them if they catch them. Most predators choose to avoid the area. Where for years we had to listen to the coyote packs howl at night. For going on 8 years,,,,, nothing. If they are coming in,,, it must be as individuals on a stealth mission. Their SCARED!!! And I have had ZERO predator losses in the 8 years with Kangals/ 1 year with Boz Shepherds.

My experience is that they roam far less. They are truely homebodies,,, But at night, they will chase off the predator for 1-2 miles. But then they come home. My Pyrenees kept me apologizing to my neighbors for messing with stuff. Although I have to say,,,, with any breed, individual differences exist.

As far as capability,,, there is nearly no other breed with their Ability to fight off a threat. In Turkey, the historical culture is to TEST TEST TEST. They constantly fight to test for the best wolf killers. Please note, they do not fight like dogfighters in the USA. Injury is prevented if possible, fights are stopped if one shows submissiveness. It is a TESTING tool. They are also tested against Tigers, African Lions, 600# Boar, Bear,,,, etc. And, just my opinion,,, any dog that can hold their own with a grown male lion, in the lions own cage,,, is VERY capable. I do not condone the harshness of the testing, but realize it was and is used as a tool to develope and maintain a dog that can protect the poor peoples source of existence,,,, their livestock. With their lives dependant on it, they have to have the best.

As far as with children and small pets. They are great. The Low prey drive is the key. 4# miniature dogs, kittens, small children are all mothered. A child can pull a pork chop out of their mouth while eating. They are naturally submissive to their family. Nothing like all the breeds that it is recommended to "Maintain Dominance".

They are not a breed for everyone, as they can become dog aggressive if challenged. Much socialization is needed to get them to accept such.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Thank you for the information.

The sire of my Pyrs was a serious dog. He'd dispatched a lot of coyotes. His sons were good dogs but they worked excellently together but not so strongly when separated. I blame myself for this largely because I should have known I needed to separate them & work them singly until they were confident on their own. Still these 2 were far more than the average person looking for protection would want. My husband came home one day aggrivated at his brother. He was unloading stuff out of the truck & was retelling me what had happened & he was extremely aggitated. The dog I would say was the weaker worker of the 2 took my husband's aggressiveness as agression toward ME. He began to belly growl, lower his stance like a wolf about to go in for an attack. I told my husband to stop & look at his dog, read his dog, respond to the need for direction from his handler - whom the dog wasn't recognizing at the moment. I told the dog 'it's okay' & my husband had to prove it really was. My husband & I may disagree from time to time but we don't get aggressive (physically or verbally) with each other. Nearly 20 years of marriage & it's always been like this. But it took a couple of days before the dog stopped watching him suspiciously. Finally when they were friends again my husband commented that he didn't know what I did to evoke a dog to so strongly protect me but he was proud of the dog for not permitting even my own husband to be aggressive toward me. (THAT's why I love him, lol)

But I noticed that at times there was more talk than action. 75% of the people I work with (even farmers/ranchers) really just want a dog to drive out the predators. Not a lot of bear or lion where I live currently. We had no complaints as we weren't losing any livestock & the neighbors were happy knowing any predators were on the run from these dogs as they didn't have anymore kids threatened by dumped dogs who'd gone rogue. I'm not a blood thirsty soul but when it comes to the safety of my animals I look for a dog who will take it to the mat if that's what's called for. One of the things that happened with our boys was that they'd be off looking after the neighbors' stuff while something killed chickens. When they'd return they'd trail whatever it was & sometimes they'd get the critter however it was a bit late for our birds.

So yeah, when the time comes I'll be looking for a homebody dog rather than the great wanderer but I'm also skilled & with enough years of handling very serious dogs to be able to train, socialize, etc... so I don't end up with vicious.

I appreciate your candor & information. You have some nice looking dogs there.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top