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I have a 15week old black lab mix and a 6 year old bullmastiff. The question mainly concerns my lab mix and about fencing for her in the yard. My BM is well trained and obeys but at 15 weeks i couldn't expect any different from my little lab right now. I do not have a fence in my yard, however i would love to let her run free and off of her leash but WAY too scared to do so in a subdivision.

I have a fairly large yard and was wondering if anyone could give advice on a wireless or underground fencing system that works. I have been doing alot of research and reading feedback that people say and its 50/50. Some say the products are amazing, some hate them.

I know that everyone loves their dogs dearly on here, as do i, so i just wondering how everyone contains their dogs while out and about in the yard. She will never be unsupervised but i feel that she isn't getting all of her energy out during our walks and runs. Especially when she gets a bad case of the zoomies (which happens quite often)

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!! Thanks in advance.
 

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I investigated several underground fences and dismissed them in favor of a conventional fence for a few reasons.

1) We have six different family dogs - two permanent and another four as frequent, sometimes long-term, visitors - and each would require training and a collar.

2) One of our two dogs has a very high prey drive and seems impervious to discomfort while in pursuit of rabbits, squirrels, butterflies, tweety birds, etc. I don't believe any non-lethal setting would slow her down a bit. Our other dog is afraid of nearly everything an might become so traumatized that she wouldn'ty want to go outside at all. (A garden hose in an unexpected place is a serious obsticle for her.)

3) An invisible fence would do nothing at all to discourage stray dogs (not to mention stray children) from coming into our yard unsupervised. Then they'd have to deal with Esther.
 

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I have one small dog and a yard that was only partly fenced so I bought long wooden garden stakes & some plastic chicken wire and enclosed the unfenced area this way. We're renting so we didn't want to go to the big expense of permanent fencing. I'd never leave my dog alone in the yard but this is definitely secure enough that we can play and let her run around in it without worrying about her getting out. Not sure how well this would work for you considering your big guy but it might be a solution for you. It was pretty inexpensive to put together, too. I think it cost me about $40 for all the materials & took about an hour to put up. I know I've read about others here doing something similar with horse fencing and metal stakes. I couldn't find enough metal stakes so I went with the wood. It's held up very well and we get some pretty strong wind here. Here are a few pics to give you a visual.




I affixed the chicken wire to the stakes with both heavy staples & twist ties.
 

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hmm very good idea Julie. I do have an area on the back side of my house that this would work for....how heavy duty is that plastic chicken wire?!? Wondering b/c she is a handful right now! LOL!
 

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hmm very good idea Julie. I do have an area on the back side of my house that this would work for....how heavy duty is that plastic chicken wire?!? Wondering b/c she is a handful right now! LOL!
I think it's pretty heavy duty. I certainly couldn't tear it bare handed and it's stood up to some pretty strong winds. It's thick enough that I required scissors to cut. So far, Molly hasn't been interested enough in it to paw at it but she's not an inquisitive puppy. I just keep her busy when she's back there and that keeps her from running into it.
 

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I have an e-fence that is a backup for a physical fence. By itself an e-fence should be thought of more as a boundary training device. It helps and Iv seen it work very well. When it works well its because people put the training time in. Note the concerns ron stated to determine if its appropriate for your dog/location/situation.
 

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Nothing is wrong with a regular fence but they are quite expensive considering i have a large yard. I didn't want to fence in my whole yard but wanted my pup to have access to run freely without worrying about cars etc. I live in a small subdivision that isn't that busy but with pups that young and wild i could never trust her to run around even with me outside. My mastiff is completely trained to stay off the road and comes when i call him so i have no worries there, just wanted to her be able to run freely in the evenings.
 

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I'm not a fan of invisible fences; like said before, some dogs ignore them, others because scared of the entire yard after one shock, they don't keep out any other animal, they aren't all that cheap actually, the batteries in the collars can stop working etc.

If your subdivision allows fencing, fences are usually a good value-added item to a house. A nicely done fenced yard is a generally desirable thing in real estate. Now, if you have a very large yard, you could get creative and fence a portion of it in a way that is both useful to you now and able to be easily modified by a future homeowner. Or go all out and fence very well and figure that you'll have a few years of use from it at least and then get back a decent portion of the initial cost when you sell. Fencing is often a good do-it-yourself project with a little planning and effort, it takes minimal tools and places like Lowes and Home Depot sell pre-made panels for privacy fence or everything you need for chain link.
Depending on where you are, you can figure a professionally installed privacy fence to run $16-18/linear foot and 4 ft chain link to run $11-12/LF. If you put up your own fencing, you can figure about 20-25% off that. (prices for large midwestern city as example)

The cheapest fencing option, although not the prettiest and not something to add any value is basically wire mesh farm fence on T-posts. very simple to put up, very durable to the rain and snow, and fairly sturdy (although I wouldn't trust it to contain a large unsupervised dog). about $100 per 50 ft section (50 ft roll of welded wire mesh + 5 t-posts)

The cheapest and simplest option of all is a 50 ft leash or dragline. Premade or a length of rope from the farm supply store with a clip attached (Tractor Supply carries what you'd need)
 

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Nothing is wrong with a regular fence but they are quite expensive considering i have a large yard.
We just fenced in our acreage - and yes, it was expensive but you can't put a price on the safety of a family member, in my opinion. I would have never trusted an invisible fence anyway for those late night pees when everything is pitch black. I like to think that my dogs have their own personal dog park now :)
 

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My daughter and I put up about 80 feet of this fence in about an hour and probably spent less than than $100 with the steel posts. There was already a fence on the other three sides of the yard.

It's held up well for years. Esther has only jumped over it once and she was highly motivated. (My wife accidentally threw a tennis ball over the fence.)

 
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