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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I live in rural Brazil where there are lots of homeless dogs.

I rescued one (Lucy, renamed Panther) and was able to find a home for her- despite not speaking Portuguese that well. :rockon:

I have been seeing this other bitch, but my DH insists that we had to find out if she had a home as many people let their dogs wander, but still are attached to them and would be very angry if we were to get 'their dog' fixed or medicated/vaccinated. So I bought a collar, made up a little tag asking the owner- if there was one- to call me.

I didn't see her for 2 weeks- despite typically seeing her several times a week. Now she looks pregnant. :doh:

I almost cried.

Our vet will do whatever we need (as long as we pay!) and I hope to find her a home.

Is there a pregnancy test for dogs? What would you do in this case?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
And an 'emergency spay' is like an abortion and sterilization together? I want to do that....but I don't know what the laws are in Brazil. Euthanizing is illegal.

I'd do an emergency spay if necessary (assuming she's pregnant). Even if she's not pregnant - I'd still spay her.
 

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Hi there from over here on the Pacific coast of South America:

I am new on this forum and joined for mutual moral support on the Rescue front because it can be a truly emotionally draining calling, as well as exhilarating and rewarding. I can see from your post that you experiencing some of that right now so let me see if I can help with some advice.

First: You may feel like you have failed this dog but you haven't. You have shown her concern, caring, and have tried to contact her owners if they exist. Most likely she does have owners and they realize she was not being properly watched and cared for and your non-confrontational method of getting that message to them was very successful.

Second: Keep in mind that you are in a foreign country, a country in Latin America where ideas about ownership and responsibility have entirely different meanings than in the USA. And reactions to what you might believe are actions in the best interest of an animal may be passionately opposed and could be violent. Be sure to consider your family's safety first and always before taking any actions.

Third: Remember that street animals in Latin America often serve a very important role in maintaining the vermin population through both eating excess food and organic matter and destroying rats and mice. Most street populations of dogs are excellent indicators of the health of a population -- of they are sleek and interact with the people, walk with heads and tails erect, and respond submissively to humans; they are indicators of a thriving eco-system. It is not beneficial in these environments to re-home every dog or spay and neuter every mature animal. Even though dogs will drop litters of puppies, not all puppies will or are meant to survive. In the event however of a poor eco-system, indicated by dogs running in dangerous packs, extremes of mange, evidence of parvo- and carona- virus, distemper and rabies, and a skinny malnourished dogs then the best suggestion is contacting you Ministry of Public Health and working within the existing public health system to attack what is a public health matter.

Yup, it's a lot to swallow -- and keep in mind some final ideas:

Do get your local vets involved in what you are doing, they may not have been educated on the advantages of population control and they need to educate their clients,

Do get in touch with your public health program to see what you can do to help them help you

Do get your local north American's involved with what you are doing -- this is too much for any one person, no matter how dedicated, to handle on their own. Try making contacts through FaceBook groups, through ExpatExchange.com and similar social media.

And finally -- give yourself a pat on the back for the dog you successfully rehomed.

Remember we can't save every one in the world, but we can make a world of difference to every one we save!

Dog tail wags and warm shnuffles from Ecuador where I live on the Pacific coast of South America with my 10 1/2 year old Poochie the intrepid traveling boxer boy and Gina our rescued reef romping (spoiled) rotten rotti girl to you and your pack.

Susan
 

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Discussion Starter #6
SUSAN!!! THANK YOU!

So much truth in what you wrote...unfortunately I am the lone American here. We ar ein a very rural area with the closest town being 2 hours a way on terrifying roads. No ex-pat exchange here. :)

Great to hear from someone who understands.



The local vet doesn't quite get why I have an interest in helping street dogs but I can readily access my health department- the head is a student!.

The best I can do now is help one dog at a time.

As it turns out, I'm pretty sure this dog has a family that considers here ''their' dog


Hi there from over here on the Pacific coast of South America:

I am new on this forum and joined for mutual moral support on the Rescue front because it can be a truly emotionally draining calling, as well as exhilarating and rewarding. I can see from your post that you experiencing some of that right now so let me see if I can help with some advice.

First: You may feel like you have failed this dog but you haven't. You have shown her concern, caring, and have tried to contact her owners if they exist. Most likely she does have owners and they realize she was not being properly watched and cared for and your non-confrontational method of getting that message to them was very successful.

Second: Keep in mind that you are in a foreign country, a country in Latin America where ideas about ownership and responsibility have entirely different meanings than in the USA. And reactions to what you might believe are actions in the best interest of an animal may be passionately opposed and could be violent. Be sure to consider your family's safety first and always before taking any actions.

Third: Remember that street animals in Latin America often serve a very important role in maintaining the vermin population through both eating excess food and organic matter and destroying rats and mice. Most street populations of dogs are excellent indicators of the health of a population -- of they are sleek and interact with the people, walk with heads and tails erect, and respond submissively to humans; they are indicators of a thriving eco-system. It is not beneficial in these environments to re-home every dog or spay and neuter every mature animal. Even though dogs will drop litters of puppies, not all puppies will or are meant to survive. In the event however of a poor eco-system, indicated by dogs running in dangerous packs, extremes of mange, evidence of parvo- and carona- virus, distemper and rabies, and a skinny malnourished dogs then the best suggestion is contacting you Ministry of Public Health and working within the existing public health system to attack what is a public health matter.

Yup, it's a lot to swallow -- and keep in mind some final ideas:

Do get your local vets involved in what you are doing, they may not have been educated on the advantages of population control and they need to educate their clients,

Do get in touch with your public health program to see what you can do to help them help you

Do get your local north American's involved with what you are doing -- this is too much for any one person, no matter how dedicated, to handle on their own. Try making contacts through FaceBook groups, through ExpatExchange.com and similar social media.

And finally -- give yourself a pat on the back for the dog you successfully rehomed.

Remember we can't save every one in the world, but we can make a world of difference to every one we save!

Dog tail wags and warm shnuffles from Ecuador where I live on the Pacific coast of South America with my 10 1/2 year old Poochie the intrepid traveling boxer boy and Gina our rescued reef romping (spoiled) rotten rotti girl to you and your pack.

Susan
 

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Glad I could help.

I live in a fishing village and less than 15 minutes from more urban areas so things are a bit easier for me.

By the way the Expatexchange.com is an internet site you can network through. Even if you are miles apart, it might help in re-homing to recently arrived expatriates who would make great forever homes.

Susan
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'll check out ex-pat exchange, but seriously I'm in the middle of nowhere, and even the urban centers do not have foreigners. Well there are Haitians, but anywho. THANKS AGAIN


Glad I could help.

I live in a fishing village and less than 15 minutes from more urban areas so things are a bit easier for me.

By the way the Expatexchange.com is an internet site you can network through. Even if you are miles apart, it might help in re-homing to recently arrived expatriates who would make great forever homes.

Susan
 
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