Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
509 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone....I adopted a Siberian Husky 7 months ago....he is now 14 months old ....I was told he had 2 homes before me....but not much else.

When I got him....he was very skiddish of us & strangers....but after a few weeks he was fine.

About 2 weeks ago....he started to become fearful of various noises....some outside, that I can't hear but he becomes afraid to stay out in the yard. Also the A/C noise -- he freaks! ...and various other noises.

I'm confused on how to deal with this problem.......any answers would be greatly appreciated.:confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,284 Posts
I'm going to guess that it might have to do with the changes in the weather here (seeing as you live not that far from me, you're probably having similar weather). Not that the weather per-se is causing it, but you just finished up a whole winter where, probably, less people were out and less noises were to be heard.

Look at the link Bentle posted, they have a lot of great advice. Use lots of treats to get him through it. Go slow with it and make sure you don't overwhelm him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,072 Posts
I would actually recommend consulting with your vet (sudden fearfulness can have medical causes - your boy is, IIRC, just the right age for onset of juvenile PRA and reduced vision is sometimes a cause for behavior changes, which would suck) and finding a good trainer locally to work with. While fearfulness CAN be worked on at home, having a trainer to help you is a real asset - you can handle the dog while they set up controlled situations to work through.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
58 Posts
Fearful and shy dogs are often born that way. Sometimes fear presents itself after a traumatic event. Shy dogs can make great pets and are often devoted to their families. What happens or does not happen in the home can have a big effect on a shy or fearful dog. Dogs that do not get out “in the world” never develop confidence to deal with new situations. Harsh physical punishment or even yelling will only make matters worse, and may even push a dog to defense. Dogs need to feel that someone is ‘in charge’ and will make decisions for him or her and keep them safe. You need to set clear limits. Genetics play a large part in each dog’s temperament. Many people assume that their shy or fearful dog was abused in an earlier life, especially if the dog comes from a shelter. With time and patience you can help your shy or fearful dog to be more confident. Dogs need to be constantly exposed to new experiences in small pleasant doses. In my opinion (and many experts agree), punishing a growling dog is dangerous. This is even more important for a fearful dog. Obedience training using positive dog-friendly methods can do a lot to improve your dog’s confidence and your relationship with your dog. Avoid training that relies on leash corrections to teach the dog.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top