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Hey guys,

I am currently seeking to buy my first Rottweiler puppy. I haven't done a whole bunch of research just yet but that's why i am here. I always had boxers growing up I use to stud one of them. So im used to having large dogs. Right now myself and my wife (whom im working on to allow me get a new puppy) have 3 tiny female dogs. 2 terrier mutts and a maltipoo. So its been a while since i had a large dog.

Anyways I have some questions and I'm also looking for some breeder recommendations in California... I have spoken to one breeder who appear to be highly rated they have the German name thing going on and all that, but their price is out of my budget, $7000 per pup. My budget would be at max $2000 when i asked them if they could reccomend a reputable breeder within my budget they told me that they dont exist in that budget. They went onto say there is a lot to be considered including extensive health checks.

Now i know from experience some breeders are all just smoke and mirrors but i don't know what to assume here it also my first time purchasing a pure breed in the USA i am originally from Ireland so its a little different.

So first i will explain what i want from this pet and maybe someone can help guide me in the right direction.

I really just want a male dog who is smart and super obedient, protective of myself, family (including the other dogs) and my property. And obviously, a healthy dog is utmost important.

I will not be showing the dog or taking part in any competitions. I would like to be within or less than 2000 as I would like to spend some money on good obedience and protection training (trainer recommendations welcome also!)

My questions are as follows.

1: Is $2000 an unrealsitic budget for a good dog?

2: Are the breeders such as above really as superior as they make out?

3: To confirming are rottys a good fit for the kind of dog i described (I hear they are)

4: If i get a rotty at 8 weeks old should their be any issue witht them and the 3 small dogs when they grow?

5: Would it be unfair to have the rottweiler be outside when the small dogs are inside? not always but when we are out etc, for security?

6: Tail docked or not docked (opinions) . I use to think for boxers it was neccesary when i was younger because it looked good now i prefer whatever is better for the dog.

7: What health checks should be perfomed by the breeder

8: What health checks can be performed by buyer before purchasing a new puppy

9: Top tips for picking a new male rotty puppy.

10: Any other tips

11: Are rottys as easily trained as the internet says they are

12: Should they be mussled when out in public?


I am sure i will think of some more questions but im really hoping to learn here before jumping in and getting a new dog and also finding a great dog with some help. Thanks guys
 

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The American Rottweiler Club is a good place to start researching. https://www.amrottclub.org/

Also, look on the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals website for the health testing the recommend for Rotties. https://www.ofa.org/recommended-tests?breed=RO&var=

Without knowing exactly who the breeder you’ve talked to is, there is no way to know whether or not they are a good breeder. I’ve known of some truly crummy breeders who charge two to three times what good, reputable breeders of the same breed charge. The “German name thing” doesn’t mean anything unless you know the breeder and their dogs.

A good breeder will title and health test their breeding dogs, and should be happy to show you hard copies of all the results, as well as know the results of other dogs in their pedigrees, as well as siblings. Most pet puppies will be sold on Limited Registration. Show or serious sport prospects will likely be sold on co-ownership.

Rotties are very smart, but can have their own opinions. Good, positive based training is a must.

Depending on your local laws, muzzling in public may or may not be required. Training a dog to accept muzzling is always a good idea, though.
 

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Mrs.Boats, if she is still on this forum, is the best resource. She owns two rottie boys from the same breeder. That breeder breeds for performance and rotts out of that kennel are among top 10 rotties in many sporting venues in this country. Mrs.Boat's dogs are gorgeous, athletic, compete in everything, and have so many titles and letters after their names I honestly couldn't sort it all apart myself.

That said, the answer to a lot of your questions is "It depends on the breeder and the lines." Rotties can be selective, aggressive dogs that I wouldn't trust around any small dogs, animals, or other people. They can be giant teddy bears who cuddle with baby rabbits. They can be anything in between. A good breeder would be able to determine if a specific pairing/litter would be a good match for your needs, or not.

Speaking to the training bit, I dislike describing dogs as "easy to train or not". Something that is easy for one person may not be for another. That said, rotties are generally very toy and food motivated, love to bite (esp. if you are seeking breeders who breed for bite sports or protection), powerful, selective about who they form social bonds with, and have high pain tolerance. So if "easy to train" to you means a dog who will work for praise and petting, and be very responsive to the tone of your voice... I would say no. If "easy to train" means a dog who is motivated by food/toy rewards if you know how to properly engage a dog with those tools... Then yes, they are no easier or harder to train than most other dogs.

Your question #12 is concerning to me. I am a huge advocate for muzzle training. But any breeder or person who thinks a breed of dog needs to be muzzled in public by nature is not someone I would trust for advice, or for purchasing a dog from. Like owning any large dog who is not bred to be overly social, and whose protective and bitey traits have been amplified (like German Shepherds, Malinois)... A well bred dog should NOT be aggressive by nature. And a poorly bred specimen of the breed is a liability and a bite risk.

I have done a lot of research on rottweilers because I adore the breed, my older dog was 50% rottie (DNA tested) and had a lot of stereotypical rottie traits, and I love bitey dogs. I ended up with a different breed for many reasons. But rotties are serious yet clownish dogs, and I hope to own one one day.
 

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Not a Rottie person but my recommendation is to find a show (don't always have to show, but sometimes easier to find) breeder who titles and health tests their dogs, especially in Rotties. They are prone to same sex aggression and can have a lot of temperament and health issues if not carefully bred. Show breeder does not mean you need to show, and they will have pet puppies available among their show puppies. Not to mention the support you will get.

1. 2,000 should be do-able for a decent breeder.. but I don't know the going breed prices very well. Sorry. :/

2. 7,000 seems insane to me but they have one thing right. Health clearances are important. Caring about a dog's temperament, structure and pedigree -are- important. Titles are usually there to prove their dogs have the right drives and temperament for the breed to be able to go out into the world and do things. Still.. I think they are waaay overcharging even for a breeder that does everything "right". I wouldn't be concerned about making sure they have the "german thing" going on.

3. Maybe, maybe not. There are other breed traits you need to take into account. Can you deal with possible same sex aggression and the possibility of your dogs not getting along? "Protective" can be all fine and dandy until it's someone you don't want to be protected from. They still need proper socialization and training. They can be hard headed and difficult too.. especially if you don't really know what you are doing training wise. True protection takes thousands of dollars to train in the right way. You probably just want an alert barker who looks intimidating. That's enough for most. I would not skip on puppy and basic obedience classes at all.

4. Again, same sex aggression and dog selectivity is definitely an issue in the breed. So the answer is.. maybe. Depends on the dog. I would talk to breeders (good breeders, not one who is trying desperately to sell you a puppy) about this.

5. I would not be leaving your dog outside for "security". This is disaster waiting to happen. What if someone steals your dog? (Trust me, if they really want to they will no matter how "scary" the dog seems). What if your dog gets loose and bites somebody? That's a liability and not a good idea for any dog. I would for sure keep small dogs and large separated while not home though.

6. Most breeders following the US standard are going to dock.

7. OFA Hips and Elbows, Eyes, and Heart at the absolute minimum but I like to see breeders go above and beyond even that.

8. That's not really something you can do..?

9. Your knowledgeable breeder should be choosing the best match for you based on your needs in dog. They might let you pick out of a few they narrowed down as your best match.. but generally good breeders match you up. They know the puppies so much better and are the "professionals" so to speak.

10. It sounds like you would benefit from meeting/talking to some Rottie people. I don't know what to tell you there. It's a lot easier when you are involved in dog sports or showing. Sometimes you can go to shows and find people willing to talk but they can also be busy and not really have the time there. There are online social media groups?

11. I'm sure they are easily trained to an extent.. but I've also been told they can be difficult. (Edit - agreed with Canyx it depends on the person too)

12. Muzzle training is never a bad idea, especially for an intimidating breed. But.. unless it is law and your dog has a bite record, no?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys. Thanks for the informative post fortheloveofdogs

When you say OFA hips, elbows eyes and hear, does this mean the parents are OFA verified or the actual pups can someone tell me what they should be showing to prove ofa verfied. Thanks
 

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OFA testing is done on the adult breeding dogs. Hips and elbows can't have an official rating until the dog is at least 24 months. Eyes need to be tested annually, in most cases. I can't recall off hand if the heart problem tested for in Rotties is something that requires annual testing or not (I know that Dobermans need annual testing). The breeder should be able to show you hard copies of the certificates, and/or you can look the dogs up on the website at https://www.ofa.org .
 

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Seems to be hard to find a breeder that offers OFA verification. Is this a huge factor for most of you guys? I feel like it should be.
 

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It's actually very common among good breeders, and you can look it up even if the breeder doesn't post on their site. For me it is 100% required if I was looking for a purebred dog, especially a large one. Heck, I'm going to submit my dog's hip and elbow Xrays to OFA (will do this when I have him neutered), and I don't have anything to do with dog breeding.

This is like, the bare minimum.
 

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It's actually very common among good breeders, and you can look it up even if the breeder doesn't post on their site. For me it is 100% required if I was looking for a purebred dog, especially a large one. Heck, I'm going to submit my dog's hip and elbow Xrays to OFA (will do this when I have him neutered), and I don't have anything to do with dog breeding.

This is like, the bare minimum.
Yea its just ive found a couple breeders who seem very caring and have great looking dogs, one is a trainer and seems very good at his job. But my research leads me to believe any breeder who truly cares will be using OFA.

One of the breeders does offer a guarantee that will give a 50% refund if the dog has any of the health issues in the first 24 months.
 

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Seems to be hard to find a breeder that offers OFA verification. Is this a huge factor for most of you guys? I feel like it should be.
It’s more common among good breeders to OFA their dogs than not. In any breed prone to orthopedic issues, I wouldn’t buy from a breeder who doesn’t test their breeding dogs.
 
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