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Hello Everyone,

Today's post is about how having an ESA has changed my life. A few months back, I had a terrible situation. I broke up with my boyfriend, lost my job, and I was away from my family. One of my friends saw me struggling with this situation and asked me to to visit a clinic. She knew I was surely in depression. I started visiting a doctor in Steady Care Medical Clinic in Santa Ana. After a few session with the doctor, I started feeling better but the main issue was when I used to go home, I was feeling the same. I felt that emptiness, there was no one to talk to. I called my doctor and told him about everything. He suggested me get an ESA. At first, i thought it was a stupid idea because at that moment I wanted a real person to listen to me, a person who can understand me. But then, it made realize that i had a special person in my life and what did he do? He left me and made my life more miserable. The very next day I visited the doctor and asked how I can apply for ESA. Now, I think my life has changed. I started living my life again. Stell, my ESA, is the one I start my day with, we go for walks, pet-friendly restaurants, shopping malls, and parks. It is fun being around her. I am doing better with anxiety and depression. So, if you are confused about having a pet, I would suggest you have a pet, an ESA or therapy animal.

Thanks
 

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I believe that dogs can help a great deal with depression. When they are raised in the home (not in the backyard), they become part of our family. They give us unconditional love and are someone we can love in return. If we live alone (no spouse, parents, children), they give us someone to come home to. They rely on us for food, water, love and companionship, which in turn makes us feel needed. This is especially important for those of us who are nurturers by nature but have no children or, in my case, children who are grown.

That said, I do think it odd that some dogs are called Emotional Support Animals when, by the definition of their title, they have no specialized training that sets them apart from any other dog. They are not trained to provide emotional support. They are not required to behave in public. They don't even have to be housebroken. And yet, their owners get special privileges, such as the ability to own a dog in a No Pets apartment building. No offense to you, but I personally think a dog needs to at least pass a Good Canine Citizen test before it is allowed to be called an ESA. At least knowing the dog is well-behaved and housebroken can provide some peace of mind to a landlord.
 
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