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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi All! I'm looking to both save money and hopefully bond more with my almost 2 year old sheepadoodle (Old eglish sheepdog and Poodle mix.) We got her 16 months ago and up to this point she's been groomed at a groomer or a mobile groomer. While I really appreciate all our mobile groomer does for us, the $80 every 6-8 weeks has become a major problem with our budget.

I wasn't sure if any of the furbaby parents on this site, or any pro-groomers have a recommendation on what type of electric clippers to purchase. So far I've been looking into the Wahl U-Clip Pro Home Pet Grooming Kit which has 4.3 of 5 stars on Amazon but it suggests that product for medium hair dogs and I'm not sure Kayla is considered medium hair or not.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated! My goal is to have her next grooming appointment next week, and just maintain the current cut myself.

-Edit-
If you are a pro groomer, do you recall what wattage your forced air dryer is? I'm using the Best Shot 3 in 1 on my dog, and the mats don't blow out but I think its because my forced air dryer isn't strong enough... My current one is 950 watts and 1.3 HP
 

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I would spend the money now to get a decent machine. I don't think that something under 40 bucks is going to last or do a decent job.
I use this clipper everyday (dog groomer) and it's a great machine, and this is a great price for it. This should last you many years and do a good job even in a thick coat.
http://www.amazon.com/Andis-Detachable-Professional-Grooming-22360/dp/B00UT3EYPA

Matts will not blow out very well in a coat like your dog has (if that left hand pic in your signature is it). You need to not allow matts to form in the first place. A double coated breed you may be able to blow out a matt pretty good, but you're lucky with a single coated (or very little undercoated) dog to have the matts become hardly any further away from the skin.

Grooming is a lot more difficult than people think. Just taking off the coat isn't too hard (barring you are very aware of the areas that are easy to cut, and depending on what length you are choosing), but making it look good is something that will take a lot of practise and some people just will never have the talent for it.
You will also need at least one good set of shears (6-8" is what I would recommend, I also like a really small shear for doing around the pads/toes, corner of the eyes), Thinning shears, 10 blade for pads and groin (some people use 15 for pads), judging by the length of the coat in the picture you will need a 30 blade with a snap on comb the length you want.
People really need to do research on grooming costs before getting a dog, but most don't.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I don't know why I didn't think to attach a more recent picture of Kayla... hopefully this can help figure out her coat type more easily. Sorry the pictures are in two different spots, I'm not sure why...

IMG_3855.jpg

MysticRealm: Thank you for the suggestion, I'll look into saving up for your recommended clippers and other items.

Kayla's hair mats when its long, I can brush her 2 hours a day LITERALLY and still she'll have mats. I have four different types of brushes for her Slicker, Rake, comb, De-Matting Comb. I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong as to why she's got so many mats but I am brushing her consistently at least every other day.

I agree at your comment that people need to research caring for their pets before getting them!! Kayla, in the first year of ownership cost me at least 3,000 in medical bills alone including insurance due to her allergies and chronic ear infections. We were able to comfortably afford all her medical care and grooming before my husband lost his job and had to take a lower paying one without guaranteed hours, and my hours have been cut back too :( I refuse to be one of the owners that let their pets go when money gets tight, which is why I was trying to find a way to groom her myself.
 

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You need a good comb for keeping her tangle free. brushing the top of the coat is not going to do anything. I suggest line brushing. Start at the dog's back foot (preferably with the dog lying on it's side). Part the hair where the foot and leg meet so you can see down to the skin. Comb that section (the foot). If there are tangles you can't comb out use your brush to remove then comb the foot out again. Go around the entire foot and once it's 100% combed out with no tangles, move 1 inch up the leg and part the hair so you can see the skin, comb the area out (using your brush to remove tangles), then move up another inch and repeat. Do this all the way up the dog's leg, then do the same thing on the body, taking small sections, parting so you can see to the skin combing until 100% tangle free. Pay special attention to armpits, flanks, top of tail, behind ears, neck (where the collar sits). Flip dog over to do other side. Once you feel the dog is fully combed out, it's best to try to brush the dog against the growth (so comb UP the legs) as sometimes you can find tangles that have hidden when brushing with the growth. Done once a day (after your first time REALLY getting out any tangles) you can move in slightly bigger sections and it should only take you 5-10 mins.
 

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No poodle mix will have medium hair. You'll need to invest in a clipper and stainless steel combs, plastic ones don't go through purebred poodle hair and they only have a single coat. If your has a double coat, you'll definitely need stainless steel combs and a good clipper for dense hair. Check the reviews to see which ones get really hot so you know to be careful not to burn your dog.
 

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I use plastic snap on combs for all of my professional grooming, and as long as the dogs are properly combed out in goes through just fine. However I do think the steel ones are a bit smoother. Just haven't felt the need to upgrade yet as I have other things on my 'wanted' list that are first.
 

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I use plastic snap on combs for all of my professional grooming, and as long as the dogs are properly combed out in goes through just fine. However I do think the steel ones are a bit smoother. Just haven't felt the need to upgrade yet as I have other things on my 'wanted' list that are first.
Yeah my groomer friend whose teaching me how to do my poodle told me I'm better off investing in stainless steel over risking having to replace plastic ones. I'm not a pro so I'm taking her word for it lol
 

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Andis makes a great 2 speed clipper (https://small-animal.andis.com/product/ultraedge®-agc®-super-2-speed-detachable-blade-clipper-purple/?item-no=24080) that works great! I used it when I started grooming years ago .You'll also want a snap on comb for the length. Andis makes some great snap on combs and so does Wahl (stick with the metal combs rather than the plastic, they just work better overall). Also, the blade you want to use under the snap on comb should be a 30 blade but BE CAREFUL! Be sure you thoroughly brush out your pet before running the snap on comb through his hair. The comb will get caught and cause a hole in the coat from the hair being cut short. I'd recommend running through the entire coat with a greyhound comb before using the snap on comb to ensure there are not knots or mats.

Please keep in mind that any type of doodle mix needs professional grooming and this should be considered when purchasing your pet (just like food would be). It helps maintain the condition and skin in great condition, which you will be happy about in the long run. $80 is actually a fantastic price for mobile grooming on that type of coat (I start at $110 for these types of designer breeds). MysticRealm has great recommendations on brushing the coat!
 
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