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Our 12 1/2 year old cocker spaniel, Rocky, recently developed a sore on his lip that is the size of a marble. It started bleeding off/on. The last month or so I also noticed the padding on his back paw had become inflamed, but wasn't bleeding. I kept an eye on both and finally took him to the vet 2 weeks ago when his lip kept bleeding and I would have to crate him so there wasn't drops of blood all over the house.

When we arrived at the vet's office, his paw started bleeding. This was the first time I'd noticed this bleeding. After getting examined, the vet asked if Rocky was drinking a lot of water. Yes. He could tell because he'd developed a pot belly. After looking at his coat, the various "old age" sores and bumps, he said Rocky appears to have Cushings Disease. He showed me how to bandage his back paw, but there was little he could do about his lip. Our only option would be to have it surgically removed. Which we both agreed, at his age, would not be the best option. He gave us an antibiotic to give Rocky twice a day.

I change Rocky's paw bandage every evening. He takes his medicine without any problems...of course it's hidden in a piece of bread with peanut butter - his favorite. His paw is still bleeding. His lip is still bleeding and I have to crate him at least once a day to give it time to dry out. Last night his lip was bleeding a lot and ended up getting all over his food. We're at the point now where we are trying to determine what is best for Rocky. He doesn't appear to be in any pain. He's slow moving and typically just lies on the tile floor most of the day.

At what point do you determine it's best to put them down? I don't want to seem selfish and that he has become an inconvenience. He can't go for walks, he gets too exhausted. We still toss his ball around, but he usually chases it, but lets our other dog catch it and bring it back. After a few rounds, he's done.

My husband and I are uncertain what to do and when to make the dreaded decision.

Here's a photo of Rocky from a few years ago...our happy playful dog.
rocky02.jpg

Here's a current photo of Rocky with his lip sore
rocky 122711.jpg
 

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My heart goes out to you. I've had several older dogs, that eventually developed health issues that needed to be humanely euthanized. Cushings is treatable, but it's a lifelong treatment. The tests and meds can be somewhat costly. Only you can tell when its time for the dog to be euthanized. Look at the quality of life. One thing I do is Think of three things the dog likes to do, and when 2 of them are gone, then the quality of life is going.
Hugs.
 

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I feel for you as well. We had to make the decision for our beloved Lhasa Apso at age 14 (RIP Nighty), he was blind, incontinent, and just wouldn't move around at all, snapped at his family members because he could no longer recognize us by scent :-(

You may find the heavy feeling dissipates and you feel relief once you feel you have made the right choice for yourselves and for him - (that's not to say you won't always love & miss him, of course)
 
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