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Are there any words or phrases you have to be careful saying around your dog because of how it would react?
Eg,
* we need to go to the "v" "e" "t".
* cookie
* walk

Do you take it a step further, are there topics you won't discuss in the presence of your dog, despite the fact your dog has no clue what you're saying?
Eg
* talk about your last dog
* talk about neutering
* if dogs go to heaven
 

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My roommate thinks her dogs know lots of words but they don't lol the one thing they do know is "outside" and only one of them gets excited when he hears it. One funny thing though is when I have the younger one in the crate when I can't supervise (cleaning, studying, etc) I can't even look in the direction of the crate because the other dog starts spinning in circles and getting all excited and worked up because he thinks I'm letting his brother out lol.
 

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The words that send Kizzie into fits of excitement are: Squirrel, Missy, Park and Walk.
Her two greatest joys in life are going for a walk in the park and hunting squirrels in our backyard. So those words make sense. The "Missy" thing started because I got in the habit of starting every squirrel reference with, "Missy, there's a squirrel in your backyard", "Missy, you better go check for squirrels" and so on. I never even get to the squirrel part of the sentence anymore. As soon as she hears "Missy" with the inflection I use for squirrel hunting, she's charging for the backdoor. I can say "Missy" all day long with no reaction, but if I say it with my squirrel hunting tone, she's off and running.

Huckle goes nutty for any word that references FOOD. He knows them all. Breakfast, Lunch, Supper, Dinner, Hungry, Cookie, Treat, Bone, Cheese, Apple, etc. You say any word referencing food and he runs to his meal spot in the kitchen and sits, waiting patiently for whatever tasty morsel is sure to come his way.
 

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Foolishly, my wife will say things to Esther like, "We'll go for a ride in 30 minutes." Of course, all she hears is "blah blah blah ride blah blah."

If you say to Esther, "Where's your baby?" she'll scamper off and find her ridiculous round, purple plush toy with legs. It's the one toy she hasn't trashed and the only one she won't share with Molly. It's very funny to see this 85-pound dog, bred to hunt big game, trotting around with her baby.

Molly doesn't seem to recognize her own name. Zeke understands way too much but generally doesn't care.
 

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Lincoln has learned words that I never even knew I taught him, LOL. Like when OH comes home for lunch, and I would see Josefina coming up the stairs ahead of him, I would say "sister!" (that's what we call her in reference to being Lincoln's "big sister" LOL) and Lincoln quickly learned what that meant, now any time I can say "sister" in any tone and he will get all excited and start looking for her.

He also knows "treat", "in your house" (go to his crate), the potty commands (pee and poop), I always spell "bath" LOL, and he knows "walkies!"

The words I did teach him deliberately are:
here (come)
up/down
around
over
high 5/10
back
walk it
over
wait
sit and heel.
through
under
of course the herding commands of away, come by, and there (where he stops and doesnt move)
 

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Meeko knows sooo many words!

Things we cannot say around him/that he understands because he's picked up on their meanings inadvertently:
- Car
- Outside
- Walk
- Bailey Blu (the pet boutique I used to work at/where we buy raw for one of our cats)
- Adventure
- Peepee
- Daddy
- Auntie
- Unnie (means, "older sister" in Korean -- it's what I call my sister)
- Treat
- Cookie
- Baegoppa? (means, "are you hungry?" in Korean)
- Thirsty
- Hungry
 

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I am absolutely blown away by bilingual dogs.

Many years ago, in Finland, I met a man with a German Shepherd. The man spoke nearly flawless English but when he addressed the dog, it was in Finnish. I couldn't get past the notion that the dog understood perfectly and I didn't have a clue.

In retrospect, it makes compete sense. You wouldn't train a dog in English if you live in Finland. And he probably wasn't really bilingual. I doubt he understood English.

So, never mind.
 

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Oh goodness.. Kairi reacts to words she knows with barking a lot of the time.. so I avoid them.

-Sweep/Vacuum
-Cookie
-Squirrel
-Kitty/Meow
-Bark
-Agility/Puppy Class
-Food/Dinner/Lunch/Eat/Hungry
-Time
-Outside
-Walk (and now "stroll" that I replaced it with)
-Ride
-"Do she want"...
-The Floor
-Everybody
-Flop
-Swimming
-Baby/Hannah/Nimbus etc (dogs she knows/knew the names of)
-Grandma/Grandpa etc (family members or people she knows)

And occasionally she recognizes words that I have no idea what she thinks they mean. Lately she keeps barking at me when I say "fries".
 

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Years ago I taught a Fox Terrier for some people that only spoke Chinese. Of course, I taught the dog in English as I do not speak Chinese. It did not seem to take the dog long to understand the same commands in Chinese when the dog went back to them.
 

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I can't say the words "walk" "outside" "car" "ride" "treat" everything else is fine, "vet" "doctor"
 

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Not really. Mine are much more focused on body language and context and it's rare that they respond to specific words in regular conversation.
 

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I am absolutely blown away by bilingual dogs.

Many years ago, in Finland, I met a man with a German Shepherd. The man spoke nearly flawless English but when he addressed the dog, it was in Finnish. I couldn't get past the notion that the dog understood perfectly and I didn't have a clue.

In retrospect, it makes compete sense. You wouldn't train a dog in English if you live in Finland. And he probably wasn't really bilingual. I doubt he understood English.

So, never mind.
I had a Siberian Husky back when I was a teenager that understood both English and Italian. We (my parents and I) would talk to her in English and my grandmother spoke to her in Italian - and she understood better than I did, LOL! She was an extremely smart dog and would pick up things not taught to her so maybe that's why.

As far as Zoey, she understands "go out", "walk", "want to eat", "go make" (she will almost always pee on command) and "cookie". She might understand "good girl" (her tail usually wags but I am usually looking at her) and definitely knows the sound of the pantry closet opening and the sound of lunch meat wrappers being handled but they are not spoken words.
 

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Not really. Mine are much more focused on body language and context and it's rare that they respond to specific words in regular conversation.
Same here. The same words that will get them all riled up can also pass right over them, but man, they are so extremely in tune with tone of voice, body language, and the little things I do differently when I say "come on" when the dogs are going out or "come on" when I'm talking to a friend. I can't even pick up on the differences myself as I've tried. But they always know straight away if they are coming, or what is going on if they're spoken to directly depending on how I am acting/speaking.
 

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Royce picked up on a ton of stuff, like me putting on snow boots meant we were walking to the car, but when I out in my work boots he would go to his kennel. I'm his own, no words, just me getting ready for work. If I grabbed a towel from the closet he would run to the bathroom.

Specific words though- very limited, he knew "hike" "Hailey"(my daughter) "ball" "rope" "squeaky" and everyone else in my family by name(immediate)
 

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When we had a beagle, and I briefly hunted rabbits, the beagle could tell the difference between a shotgun and a rifle - both of which were cased.

The shotgun meant we were going rabbit-, or possibly pheasant-, hunting and he was going going along. The rifle meant we were going to the range and meant nothing of interest to him.
 

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Grandma/Grandpa, walk, dog park, cookie, treat, breakfast and supper are the big ones. Can't spell walk either, he figured that out pretty quickly, so now if I want to talk about taking him for a walk later, I have to say that I'm going to take you know who for a you know what, lol. I have to be really careful what I give call it when I give him a cookie or treat too. If I tell him I'm giving him a cookie, but give him something HE considers a treat or vice versa, I'll get a super disgusted look when I give it to him, and he'll actually refuse to eat it at first, lol.

He also has a huge stuffed zebra that he's had since he was three months old that he absolutely loves, and if I ask him "where's your zebra?", he'll run off, find the zebra, and start playing with it. If I say "go get your zebra!", he'll run off, find the zebra, and bring it to me to play tug with. I once told him to "go get Grandma!" when we were at my parents' house, and the poor boy ran to find my mom, then kept running back and forth between her and me, getting super frustrated, because he couldn't make her come with him, lol.
 

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We don't avoid topics, but we do need to be *very* careful of the Dutch word for cat: poes (say: 'poo-s')

Because he'll go barking crazy sprinting to the window to chase away the enemy.

Indirectly, we also need to avoid common words that sound similar to poes, like appelmoes (mashed apples), hoes (fabric), ****** (shower), the English word 'moose' (why that comes up so often? I really don't know).

It also doesn't help that our neighbor's cat is called Poesj.

EDIT: Hahaha, the Dutch word for 'shower' got starred, lol.
 

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When we got our first dog we lived in an area where people would just open their door and let their dogs out and they would wander all over the neighborhood. To keep them away from our puppy I would say, "get out of here" and shoo the dog away. Once puppy got older she understood "get out of here" to mean get chase something out of the yard. If I was talking on the phone I couldn't use the phrase because, Kuba (my dog), would go bananas and pace and bark from window to window. We moved to a new house so we didn't have to worry about stray dogs. Except the dog never forgot the phrase. My brother was over and my husband was telling a story and my brother exclaims, "get out of here" and dogs goes crazy until we let her out and she finds a rabbit to chase.

This bad habit of hers came in handy though, some kids one night were shining a laser pointer in my window so I told Kuba to get out of here and opened the door and she found the kids, and they went screaming down the street. Kuba was a Dobe.
 
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