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So I just cut my Lexi's front paws and she didn't seem to happy about it. I luckily didn't hit the quick so I'm happy about that. I was think about getting a Dremel tool but I was wondering if anyone has used this and if they and their dogs liked it and how well it worked.
 

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Zoey absolutely hated it.. she didn't like the vibrations on her feet.. And then there's the problem of her having long hair and trying to keep it out of the dremel..

I should add that it does work wonders for lots of dogs though.
 

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Nia doesn't really care about the dremel when I'm doing her feet but she has long flowing hair on her legs and body which can easily get caught and get torn off in the dremel so I'm back to clippers. Although she absolutely hates these and is scared of them, I would rather have that than her hair ripping painfully through the dremel.
 

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I can do an American Cocker in show coat and not get coat in the dremel. Just takes some multi tasking to keep it out of the way. That said I know people who use nylons.. poke the nail you are currently doing through a hole you've made in the nylon to keep the rest of the fur out of the dremel.
 

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It works but S ........L........O........W.

Make sure your nail cutters are very sharp.
A good dremel is just as fast if not faster than using nail trimmers. You want as many RPM's as you can get, and one with good power..NOT the pedicures and knock offs, as they don't have the power and just chug away at the nail. It should take just a few seconds each nail. Dremels have their places. They are great for dogs that are afraid of the trimmers. They are great for getting the nails shorter than a trimmer can, without bleeding them. And they round off the sharp edges left from trimmers. Of course, most dogs need a short desenitizing period. And yes, the stockings are great if you can't hold the hair back out of the way of the sanding band.
 

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I use a dremel for grooming. Some dogs can take it and others don't like it. It does a great job on nails. you can get them a lot shorter,rounded, and less likely to quick a dog. You should look into one with a variable speed. Start on a low speed and let your dog get use to the noise. If they can deal with the noise I start tapping (little amount of pressure) on their back leg nails to see how the react to the vibrations (I start with the back cause dogs seem to be less touchy about their back paws). If the handle everything ok I add more pressure and stay on the nails longer. This may be a two person job till you and your dog get use to it.
 

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Now, when you all say Dremel, are you talking about the kind you find in the power tool department of say, Walmart? I have one, but want to make sure that is what you are talking about before I try it.
 

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Now, when you all say Dremel, are you talking about the kind you find in the power tool department of say, Walmart? I have one, but want to make sure that is what you are talking about before I try it.
Yep, you got it. Can get them at Walmart, Lowes, Menards, Home Depot, etc. I haven't seen any good ones at Walmart..but I like them to have alot of power...less vibration, and goes thru the nail much faster.
 

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I have a dremel multipro, and a knockoff one made in china. Make sure you use sanding drums with it and not grinding stones. They heat up super fast and can burn.
 
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