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Our neighbor's dog jumped in our backyard tonight, and I noticed that Casey did some "dominance posturing" with the other dog (putting his neck over the back of the other dog's neck, standing erect, etc...) which made the other dog bark/growl at him a couple of times (didn't escalate though). And sometimes at the vet, Casey really barks at other dogs. Is there any way to make a dog less dominant when greeting/playing with other dogs? (To add, the dog who jumped in our backyard is dominant over the female dog that lives with him- so I think he's got some dominance too. Casey is submissive to our older dog, Roy)
 

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I wouldn't worry about it. The dogs "speak" to each other and work that all out. The way things get messed up is when we interfere. :) As long as you provide strong leadership (or partnership or whatever you wish to call it), then the dogs will take care of the rest.
 

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Mary does the same thing. When I was dog sitting a friends dog I noticed it was getting a little extreme and I saw the guest dog who Mary was trying to dominate had a lip twitching so I thought I should intervene. The moment that I stepped in between them snarling and snapping from both dogs instantly ensued. Next time I will let them work it out on their own.

I am trying to establish a better understanding of when to intervene or not by video taping some shelter dogs. I think I will post them sometime. It should be interesting.
 

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You can shape better greeting/play manners by rewarding GOOD manners (sniff and then redirect to playing, soft eyes, soft body language) when your dog is interacting with another dog.
 
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