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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any ideas on how to get my new rescue dog to stop chewing up my oxygen tubing. I tried spraying it with bitter spray but he seems to like it. I really need the oxygen so it is becoming a real challenge.
 

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When is it happening? Every time you interact with her, or just when she's worked up and overexcited?

You can treat this the same way you would her chewing on you - every time teeth (or even muzzle, given how big a deal a puncture could be) touch tube, she gets put in a pen or behind a baby gate (so she can't get to you) and gets no interaction from you for 5-10 seconds. Don't say anything or even look at her. After that 'time out' she can come back out to interact with you, but if she does it three times in a row then playtime is over for a while. This will take some time, especially if she's a puppy who hasn't developed much impulse control yet, but most dogs do start catching on that putting their teeth on the trigger isn't going to be tolerated.

If it will not interfere with your medical equipment, you could also put some double-sided tape along the oxygen tube where she tried to chew the most. Many dogs don't like the sticky sensation and yours might find it more of a deterrent than the bitter spray.
 

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Keep anything you do not want the dog to chew on out of the dog's reach.

Or, run the O2 tubing through small PVC pipes or something similar so that the dog cannot get to it.
 

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Cat-dog, GSD spayed female and Tornado-dog, JRT mix, neutered male
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O2 tubing is difficult. It has to be flexible in order for you to be able to move around the house. One end is attached to you, the other to a large stationary device and the tube is long enough for you to walk without restriction from one room to another plus outside a distance. Because the tubing moves with you (or trails behind you) it also creates a sense of play for the dog. You can't even baby gate the dog away from it, because you will have to go through/in that area at some point and the tubing will come along.

You can try spraying vinegar or a mixture of vinegar and lemon juice on the tubing. It may work where bitter apple isn't. If it does, reapply often.

Double sided tape might work, but it would be difficult to do the entire tubing and it could cause the tubing to stick as you are moving through the house.

I would put the dog on a leash so they are right with you. Then do "leave it" training whenever they start to go for the tubing. You will need to keep the dog leashed all the time and baby gate or crate them while you sleep.
 
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Since the sprays did not work and that tank is heavy it's hard to just put out of the way. And of course you can stop the behavior when you notice it, but for the immediate future (while eating,napping or watching TV),you may not notice. We use coiled spring protection when designing flexible tubing in factories, kitchens etc to protect from abrasion,sharp items and rodents. You can buy inexpensive small diameter coil springs which are generally available in 1meter lengths (39 inches) , available in pairs for various sizes with outer diameter (OD) of 2.5-10 mm. The inner diameter (ID) will be 1.0 mm less than th OD. How tall is the dog ...will 78"of spring provide enough protection ? I think you will find that the dog won't like the "feel" of it in it's mouth and if it does not work, all you risked is $14

The typical ID of tubing id 3/16" (4.75 mm) and 7.14 mm OD.....so if that's what you have you'd need a 9+ mm ID on the spring. The 10mm OD sizes should them fit


Note that the description says "(2.5-8) mm Out Diameter" but if you look immediately below where it says "see all options",you will see the 10 mm one available and I was able to add it to my cart and it gave the correct sizing (0.5x10x1000mm)

We build water cooled computers and one of the things generally involved "sleeving the wires with heat shrink. You will find all sorts of sleeving options here from copper braid to fiberglass

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
He is a work in progress. We got him in October. It took us until Christmas to convince him that he wouldn't die if he came in the house. He doesn't trust people much but is slowly coming around. I can't crate him yet. He is terrified of crates. The tube is 50 feet long and is like being on a leash myself. He tends to chew the tube if I am not where I can see him. I went today and got some cheap mirrors to place around so I can see him even when he thinks I can't and hopefully catch him more quickly. We haven't worked much on basic commands like "leave it". Our main focus has been on getting him in the house. Up next is keeping him off the table. He likes to sleep there. I don't think he has much experience being in a house with people. From what I understand he spent a lot of time chained to a tree and then in shelters. He is going to require a lot of training and patience but he is worth it. I just need to keep breathing while I work with him. He is a greyhound/lab mix and very tall. The shelter thought he was about 18 months. Our vet thinks more like 9-12 months.
 

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I'd try using a leash in the house. You can get him used to being on a leash, staying off the table, and looking to you rather than just at you.

My dad was on oxygen so I remember the hose and having to be careful not to step on it, etc. Fortunately none of the dogs paid it any attention. I suspect my Tornado-dog would have been The One that caused trouble.
 

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Yes, tethering him or confining him to whatever room you're currently in is likely going to be the best bet if he's chewing the cord when you can't see him, like with tethering. If there's times that's not possible, your next best option is to train him to be comfortable in a crate or pen, or confine him to a room you do not currently need access to (for example, if you're working in the kitchen, he can stay in the bedroom). He's in a very difficult age - basically dog teenagehood - and has had a rough start, so it probably will take a good deal of time and patience, but he sounds like a character! Thank you for giving him a second chance.
 

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Wow .... my wife was on a portable oxygen thing for 6 weeks after COVID. When she got tired of just laying around, she;d just pick it up and carry around. The tube Id say was about 7-8 feet long and all we had worry part was the 2-3 feet within the dog's reach. Your 50 footer presents an entirely different situation. Also your mobility as the tubing moved certainly will attract the dogs attention as something to play with.

Of course, breaking the behavior is key here and the spring / sleeeving was offered only as a temporary solution while you accomplish that. The sleeving options remains but the material runs as high as $1.80 a foot making ut an expensive option for what is hoped to be a temporary behavior.
 
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