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Discussion Starter #1
I have an 8 or 9 month old hound mix puppy that won't leave the cat alone. She only chases when she runs, but whenever the cat is on the ground, she'll follow her and try to get her to play (bouncing around, butt up in the air, barking, etc.) When the cat is on the couch, she is up in her face, and smelling her so much she's lifting the cat's butt up in the air. The cat grew up with dogs and does not care at all, except when she's cornered. Every once in a while she'll give the dog a whack, but more often than not, it seems like she's trying to egg the her on. The cat has the entire finished basement as her safe zone, but chooses to spend her time in the living room.

The only time she ever really leaves the cat alone is when she is tired. Even when she has a toy, the cat is more fun. It especially sucks because the cat is very people friendly, but the dog get jealous (whining/barking) when we have people over and the cat jumps on someone's lap.

We worked on leave it at the beginning when the cat got on the couch, and that worked out well to stop the jumping and frantic barking. However, once the cat is on the ground, even food won't deter her from following the cat around for more than a few seconds.
 

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My dog ADORES our cat. The feelings are not always mutual... She does the same thing. A solid "leave it" is what gets us through... I can tell the cat doesn't mind though because she constantly walks up to the dog and winds in and around her legs. But when she (the dog) gets TOO obsessed/singularly focused I don't like that so I'll make her go to her bed or otherwise leave the cat.
 

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If she is more interested when the cat is on the floor, then you need to practice with that situation specifically. You may need to increase the distance between dog and cat at first, or up your reward value.
 

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Someone else may have some different advice, but to me it sounds like perhaps a good solution would be to do a "puppy time out" when your 'leave it' command goes ignored.

So, basically, when the puppy is bothering the cat and the cat has given warnings for the puppy to leave her alone but the puppy persists, say 'leave it' (or whatever words you use). When the puppy ignores 'leave it', calmly pick her up and put her behind a baby gate or somewhere she can't get to the cat. Then, after a few moments of settling, remove and restart. Eventually, the puppy will realize that insisting upon pursuing your cat means getting put in time out.

Same process would probably work for when the puppy gets jealous of the cat and whines and barks when the cat gets attention :) It will most likely take a ton of repetition, but since you can't redirect with food, you aren't left with a whole lot of tools at your disposal.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I swear the cat secretly likes her. When she's asleep, the cat walks all around her, and walks right up to her face. Any other time, the cats like "yeah, I see what you're doing, I'm just going to ignore you".

We've worked on the floor stuff, although it is a bit hard trying to keep the cat from moving a lot. We've done a "leave it" on the floor, and redirection with food, and that works, unless the food isn't given to her almost immediately, or she sees the cat moves in the process of her coming over for food. She's really good at sit/stay and we tried to incorporate that as well, but once the cat moves, she's done. She knows if she calmly walks up to the cat, she'll stay put and she can sniff her and follow her around, and we reward her for that. She's still a puppy though, and tries to play with her a lot too, which doesn't work in her favor. When she gets super worked up, we put her into the bathroom for about 30-45 seconds as a time-out.

Someone else may have some different advice, but to me it sounds like perhaps a good solution would be to do a "puppy time out" when your 'leave it' command goes ignored.

So, basically, when the puppy is bothering the cat and the cat has given warnings for the puppy to leave her alone but the puppy persists, say 'leave it' (or whatever words you use). When the puppy ignores 'leave it', calmly pick her up and put her behind a baby gate or somewhere she can't get to the cat. Then, after a few moments of settling, remove and restart. Eventually, the puppy will realize that insisting upon pursuing your cat means getting put in time out.

Same process would probably work for when the puppy gets jealous of the cat and whines and barks when the cat gets attention :) It will most likely take a ton of repetition, but since you can't redirect with food, you aren't left with a whole lot of tools at your disposal.
Haha, I just posted that. We do give her a time-out when she gets really worked up.
 

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The other thing to consider is that your hound mix puppy is genetically predisposed to be attracted to anything that moves. Hounds are hunting dogs, so her genetics are probably working exactly contrary to the training you're trying to instill. It might be that she will never be able to 100% ignore the cat when the cat is moving, in which case your best bet is to provide the cat with escape routes and separate when the situation escalates past what you think is acceptable. At least it seems as though she wants to play with the cat and not do any harm to her, so there is that :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I'm very glad we didn't end up with a "killing" type hound. She has a nose and likes to chase, but no desire to kill. There is a rabbit in the yard that is not afraid of her at all, and the dog has never shown any signs of trying to kill it. I've even accidentally walked right past the rabbit (we were maybe 3 feet away) with her and she just stopped to smell it, then kept moving. She reaalllly wants the cat to play with her, and even when she does chase the cat and corner her, all she wants to do is smell all over her.

You can see it now, when she gets older and settles down, she is going to be a great dog. I'm sure she'll grow out of it for the most part, we've only had her for 3 months.
 

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My foster dog just got adopted to a family with a cat. I'm pretty sure he's going to be the same way your girl is with their cat. Not aggressive but very interested and wanting her to play with him. He goes home with them on Wednesday and I'm really hoping this is the case with him. This kind of interest isn't really dangerous, just obnoxious. Of course they said their cat is kinda skittish so she's likely to be hiding and probably will run so that'll be fun...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
We have a 17 year old cat who's not very interested in playing with the dogs we foster. What I noticed is that Cats have a different mindset than dogs. While a cat has a "shared territory" mindset, a dog has a "Pack" mindset. When a pack member goes to leave the room, the dogs want to follow to stay near the pack, while the cat says "Why the ... are you following me!" The dog may also be following because she's curious as to what the cat is going to do.

What I did was I fed my cat right before I fed my dog. I had to practice "Leave it" specifically with the Cat Food dishes too. This is supposed to establish the Cat outranks the Dog, but that's only a theory. It might also benefit you to teach a "Go to Bed" or "Go to your Spot" command. Another thing that is helpful is to keep the dog on a leash. It will be easier to stop them.
Another thing I did was I had water in a spray bottle that I used whenever I needed to give a quick correction. The way I see it, the water acts the same as if you tapped or body blocked the dog. It got her attention quick, and I have a disability making the other corrections harder. It's important to use the water when the dog is starting to decide to go after the cat, because if she's too excited it won't be as effective. It's also important to selectively use the water because you don't want the dog to get used to it. Mine would stop and lay down again if I so as touched the water bottle.
Thanks. The cat gets fed at night in her own room downstairs because she's on medication. I may try to spray bottle as a shock factor though.
 

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My dog LOVES my cat and is also overly fascinating with every action she takes. However, I've required him to learn impulse control so that even when the cat sprints off, he doesn't give chase. There is never a time that it is ok for a 90 lb dog to initiate play with a 7 lb cat. I would only allow interaction if he's lying down AND the cat approaches him.

I would never let your dog chase ... ever. If I had to put him back on leash, if I had to do time outs, if I had to baby gate him to break up the house so he can't get momentum, I would do it.
 
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