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I have a six and a half old Great Pyrenees/Golden Retriever pup.She minds well,sit,lay down,will even sit and wait while I put her leash on. But she will not come when you want her to. I've tried treats,everything,but to no avail.She'll run around and play until she's good and ready and only then will she come to me. I'm too sick to chase her around while she plays her game. What can I do?
 

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Always keep her on lead and stop chasing her around. You are teaching her to ignore you. In fact, it sounds like she already has you well trained like she wants you.

Call her, and reel her back in with the lead and treat.

NEVER give a command you can't enforce.
 

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you have to be more interesting than anything else to her. carry a hotdog in a zipped pocket, or a squeaky toy. something really awesome. Start with sessions in the home stating the dog's name and the command word (come) when they get to you give them a piece of the hotdog and praise praise praise! pretty soon you'll have a dog that breaks sight of a bolting rabbit, and coming to you on command for that hotdog.
months down the line you can eliminate food or treat reward, but to keep the signal sharp, you should still use it every once in a while.
 

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GEt a long line and keep her on it, till she comes reliably to you. She'll be able to get some running around and sniffing in. Does she like to play fetch? I find that is a great way to get them coming to you. I use 2 balls, pretty soon the dog figures that if you want to play you have to come back, drop the ball and then you can throw the 2nd.
 

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Yep, keep her on leash. Chasing only encourages not coming. When she is on leash, call her to you. If she doesn't come, drag her in. When she is in front of you praise her, and treat her like crazy.

Also, try Really Reliable Recall.
 

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When she ignores you, go the opposite way. Never chase her or you will be teaching her to be chased. She is reaching that age where she is trying her independence.

You mention you are sick and cannot chase her around... which makes me wonder how much exercise she gets. This is a combination of breeds that likes to keep moving all day long... Really active. Is the dog getting enough exercise (walks on a leash and training sessions)?

If your dog is not getting enough exercise (and letting a dog out in the yard is not enough exercise) he isn't interested in coming when called. He has too much energy and too much desire to play.
 

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I've run into a similar issue with our two alaskan malamutes. We adopted them from a shelter where they spent time after being removed from a puppy mill. Neither dog has been exposed to commands. The older female (6yrs) is easier to work with, but the 2yr old male is just a bundle of energy. When he's outside and it is time to come in for the evening, he'd rather play a round of "keep-away". We've had to trick him into coming near us so that we can lead him into the house. Once we get a hold of his collar, he walks right up the steps into the house. Right now we don't play the game and ignore him and he eventually comes in on his own (doggie door), but we'd like for him to come in when called. The idea of a leash seems awfully confining for a dog that is using up energy chasing chipmunks and squirrels. Is attaching him to a long leash really the answer??
 

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We rescued a 4 year old female great pyrenees/border collie mix 4 years ago. She is very well trained, except for one thing. She escapes from the yard and then won't come when called. She comes 100% of the time when she's in the yard, but once she's out my husband has to run her down on his bike and corner her. Any suggestions about how to deal with this problem? Apparently the escaping is part of being a pryenees.

Thanks. Jill
 
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