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Hi I need advice for my Maltipoos. He is very aggressive towards other dogs and wants to act like he wants to fight the dogs while he is on the leash, but when he is off leash, he is completely shy and doesn't know how to socialize. How can I get him to socialize.I have a female maltipoo as well and she is just a follower and does what the male does. How can I fix my issue? Also, my male dog whines in our car every time we are going somewhere. I do not know if he thinks we are taking him to the vet or not but he just goes crazy in our car. He makes this laughing whining sound. I tell him to stop but he completely ignores me. I think he may have abtained this behavior from his previous owners, since he is a rescue.
 

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Take them both to puppy socialization class. You may want to take them to different classes so you can focus on one at a time.

Then take them to obedience class. You want a trainer/class that uses positive techniques.

Unfortunately, dogs don't understand "stop", " shut up", etc. So you can say that all you want, they are just going to keep barking until you teach them an alternative to barking.
 

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It sounds like your male may be fearful. It's common for fearful dogs to put on big, aggressive displays when they feel like they can't get away (such as a leash is restricting their movements and preventing them from leaving), only to be extremely shy off leash because they want the other dog(s) to go away, but they don't actually want to fight. How old are they and how are you socializing? He may not be a dog who ever does well with strange dogs, such as in a dog park, and forcing him into highly stressful (for him) dog-dog social situations can definitely make his behavior worse.

I'd also urge you to work with both dogs separately, especially if you want to avoid the female feeding off his behavior and starting to mimic it. By giving them one-on-one time to experience the world, it's a lot easier to make sure they're getting their individual needs met. For example, your male sounds like he needs lots of distance from other dogs to learn that they're not scary or stressful to be around, but your female might be fine at a closer distance, and could already be learning how to be polite when passing other dog walkers.
 

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DaySleepers has some good advice.

Finding a trainer who specializes in working with reactive dogs would be your best option.

Places to start looking for a trainer include:

In the meanwhile, this is an online class that would probably help. Fenzi Dog Sports Academy - BH150: Management for Reactive Dogs It's only $65 for the auditing level, but enrollment closes tomorrow. There is a student group that has a Teaching Assistant to help auditing level students, if you are on Facebook. You have access to all the lectures, and can watch working students homework videos in the class forums, as well as read the instructor's feedback. You will have access to the lecture portion of the class for a year, and the forums stay up for six weeks after the end of the class session.
 

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If you do end up getting help from a professional trainer, be certain ahead of time that the trainer uses only positive reinforcement methods. Any trainer who uses leash jerks, shock collars, (even on "vibrate"), scolding, punishment, or any form of aversive method should be very strictly avoided. Those trainers don't know how to handle or train dogs properly, for one thing. And in the case of a dog who is showing any aggression, handling the dog with any form of the above aversive methods will be guaranteed to make the dog more afraid and less trusting and therefore more aggressive. Trust me on this. I know what I am talking about.

The FENZI course, noted above, is excellent and I highly recommend it. A lot cheaper than hiring someone, as well.

And people here will help you the best we can.
 

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Hi I need advice for my Maltipoos. He is very aggressive towards other dogs and wants to act like he wants to fight the dogs while he is on the leash, but when he is off leash, he is completely shy and doesn't know how to socialize. How can I get him to socialize.I have a female maltipoo as well and she is just a follower and does what the male does. How can I fix my issue? Also, my male dog whines in our car every time we are going somewhere. I do not know if he thinks we are taking him to the vet or not but he just goes crazy in our car. He makes this laughing whining sound. I tell him to stop but he completely ignores me. I think he may have abtained this behavior from his previous owners, since he is a rescue.
Keep in mind that socialization does not mean the dog has to want to meet every person and dog you come across. Heck, I don't want to visit with everyone! Your dog may just be selective in who he wants to greet. And that is OK.

The first thing is, never under any circumstances force him to meet anyone, dog or person. If he doesn't want to, then listen to him and take him in another direction. Nothing is ever gained by forcing the dog into meetings he doesn't want.

Socialization is getting the dog comfortable with different situations, different places, and so on. It is not trying to get the dog to be friendly with everyone. If he is shy, then be sensitive to that. He may be a bit fearful and if so he needs to know you have got his back, and won't try to make him do anything he doesn't want to do. Some dogs are just shy by nature. some people are too. Neither one will benefit from having someone expect them not to be shy just because that is what they prefer.

work with the dog, watch the Fenzi course and so on. But if your dog continues to be shy, then love your shy dog just the way he is. Not all personality traits need to be "fixed".
 

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Socialization.. is just a bad word for what it means. It does NOT mean 'meet and greet' people or dogs. It means getting your dog comfortable focusing on YOU in various environmental situations. YOU are the safe place and focus on YOU is the safe default.

Your Maltipoo is not aggressive. He is scared and defensive. He's on a leash.. you don't have his back because he is out in front of you.. he can't run away.. so he acts like he can to try to scare the other dog off.

Put yourself between him and other dogs and people. "No you cannot meet/pet my dog" is an acceptable response to other people with or without dogs.

Be VERY careful of the suggestion to go to "socialization" classes as some of these are all about "meet ups" (again that word does not mean what it sounds like it should mean). A "meet up" class would not help your dog.

Also, walk the two dogs separately and train each one separately. Together they key off each other and getting focus is a lot harder.
 

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Be VERY careful of the suggestion to go to "socialization" classes as some of these are all about "meet ups" (again that word does not mean what it sounds like it should mean). A "meet up" class would not help your dog.
Thanks. I posted in a rush and didn't explain the socialization class recommendation.

To the OP, you want to find a class that will focus on giving the puppies positive experiences being out in the world. As said, it's not about interacting with other dogs, it's about not fearing everything. A good socialization class will show YOU how to react to your dog when a plastic bag is blown past them and startles them. The class will have you walk on different types of flooring or ground so they get used to different sensations.

When I was a kid, I did 4-H. I took dog training as a project. We showed our pet dogs in conformation and obedience competitions (the conformation judged how we handled our dogs rather than how the dog met any breed standards). There was also a guide dog for the blind competition. It was an "obstacle" course that you walked your dog through. It included things like walking over a metal grate, having a car backfire, having the dog sit stay outside a small trailer while you went inside, among others. The purpose was to test how well adjusted the dog was to common sensations and experiences. A dog who is afraid of a car backfire won't be much use for a guide dog that needs to guide their person through the streets. That test was open for all 4-Hers, not just those raising guide dogs. That's why guide dog puppies are given to families for their first year of life rather than kept at the facilities - because the puppies need to experience life in its fullest to become well-rounded and well-adjusted dogs who can handle what life throws at them without endangering their person.
 
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