Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Okay, so Banjo has just recently started barking when she wants attention. Previously she would just lick you and jump on you (and we ignored her till she sat, and she improved somewhat over a couple months). The reason, though, that I think she is barking is that our other dog, Aurora, is now ignoring her attempts to play until she resorts to barking, at which point Aurora will play with her. This seems to be teaching Banjo that barking will get her attention.
Has anyone ever had a dog that was de-training your other dog? And what do you do about it besides keep them apart (which I'm NOT willing to do). It's not a terrible problem, it's just a little annoying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,977 Posts
Okay, so Banjo has just recently started barking when she wants attention. Previously she would just lick you and jump on you (and we ignored her till she sat, and she improved somewhat over a couple months). The reason, though, that I think she is barking is that our other dog, Aurora, is now ignoring her attempts to play until she resorts to barking, at which point Aurora will play with her. This seems to be teaching Banjo that barking will get her attention.
Has anyone ever had a dog that was de-training your other dog? And what do you do about it besides keep them apart (which I'm NOT willing to do). It's not a terrible problem, it's just a little annoying.

If Banjo is barking for your attention, "explain" to her that it won't work by ignoring her. Dogs are context learners - Banjo will realize that barking at Aurora works, but not at you. Since you've already "explained" that sitting calmly is how to get your attention (by ignoring her until she does), I'd just keep right up with that. Right now, maybe Banjo is thinking barking is the answer because it worked with Aurora, so now she's seeing if it will work on you. Banjo is asking a question in the canine way - by offering a new behavior in a familiar context. Your reaction (or lack of) will be her answer to the question.

I don't know if I'd called it de-training or re-training, and I don't think there's much you can do if they are going to be together - they are going to work out their own communications and rules between them. I would worry less about how they work the rules out between them and make sure the rules you've worked out with both of them still hold up.

That's not inconsistency in my mind, it's utilizing the dog's context learning to your advantage. Banjo gets to bark Aurora's mind silly, but still sit calmly when wanting to interact with you.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top