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Well for the last few days Choca has been getting in front of my mom and I and just stands there. She knows what "move!" means but just does not want to move for some reason. She will just stand there and just sniff. Other times if I am going to my mom's room she will run in front of me. A few times I grabbed her just in time by her scuff and pulled her back and held her down to get the message across; "YOU ARE NOT FIRST, YOU ARE THE DOG NOT THE HUMAN, I AM YOUR PACK LEADER, RESPECT YOUR PACK LEADER. I WILL BE FIRST NOT YOU." After that she would walk behind me or go and lay down. But it is starting back up.

Well any suggestions?
 

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Just a couple of thoughts....sounds like you see this as dominance instead of a well socialized, enthusiastic dog which you want to somehow change.
The dog running ahead isn't a dominance thing but, the danger is doors...bolting out the door and into the street. That's where the training for stopping at the door and waiting (to put on the leash) comes in.
Sniffing/checking things out is how dogs relate to you as pack members...where you been....what've you've been doing...again, that's not dominance.

For the non-response to commands (move) that just takes training but, when you give the move command you must be very specific about exactly what you want her to do....go lay down on her mat? Back-up? Move...WHERE....exactly?
 

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All that Alpha/Wolf Pack/Dominance stuff really has little to no value when it comes to dog training. Much of it is outdated and misinformed to boot. Dogs are not wolves and they know we are not dogs - they don't operate on a 'wolf pack' mentality.

It's also worth noting that reaching out to grab the scruff of a moving dog is not only a good way to get bit, but could also end up hurting your dog.

I've never understood what the big deal is when it comes to dogs walking in front, behind, or off to the side (not talking about commands like 'heel' here - just regular walking with your dog, like in the house). Walking in front of you is not a dominance thing and if you want her to move out of the way then just use the commands she knows. There's absolutely no reason to be grabbing her or using any sort of 'dominance theory'.
 

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What is her breed? Sounds like it could be a herding behavior.

If this were my dog, I would just keep walking. I would be careful not to hurt her or step on her, but I think she would learn that she has to watch where I am. I don't believe in having to tell my dog to get out of my way all the time. Much less telling her what to do or where to go. I don't care where she goes or what she does, as long as she's out of my way. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Its a beagle mix. She was born out in the country. Did not get to see her father. That is the unknown breed.
 

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The dominance, pack leader stuff is excellent, if somewhat unpopular on DF. And you are not going to hurt your dog by grabbing the scruff of his neck. But it is a little hard to understand your question. What do you mean the dog is going 'in front of you'? Are you walking somewhere and he is going in front? Facing you or away? Going thru doorways?

You have to be specific and consistent about what you want. If you don't want him walking in front of you, then teach him to heel and he won't walk in front of you AFTER you give him that command until you release him. If you want him to let you thru doorways or down stairs first, just consistently bring him back and make him wait (no need to punish or overdue it, he'll get the picture eventually). Even if you don't believe the 'dominance' stuff it is good dog manners. But generally not being 'in front of you' I don't really get, and if I can't get it then the dog likely can't either.

Edit: I just read 4isCompany's post which is right on, if you mean the dog just keeps getting in your way just, rudely but gently, walk right thru him. He'll learn to move. Hopefully, he'll also learn not to lie in high traffic areas. LOL
 

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Agree with what the others have said here. When we first got Mayzie, she was ALWAYS standing in my way, rushing down the steps in front of me, etc. And this is a dog that has no desire whatsoever to be dominate in any form or fashion. She just didn't know what I expected of her.

So when she was in front of me in the hall or someplace else, I would just very gently shuffle my feet forward while saying "excuse me" and she would move out of the way. No need to display that I was the "alpha" or be rude about it. After a few times, she got it and unless she's really excited, she usually moves out of my way when I'm coming through.

As another example of "dominance" being misunderstood...Mayzie pretty much always defers to my male dog, Ranger. He gets first pick of the toys, wins games of tug, etc. But when it comes to going through doorways or going outside, he always lets her go first. He doesn't see it as some kind of threat to his position in the pack. It's just something they've worked out between them and he's totally cool with it.

Of course you need your dog to get out of your way and not be underfoot just for convenience sake. But don't get too worked up about alpha and dominance because I sincerely doubt that's what this is.
 

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I wonder if she's hearing you. Have you tested her hearing? Maybe you can do a test at home. Softly call her name when she's looking away. Beagles are known to be a bit stubborn, too.

My advice stands. I never give a command unless I'm prepared to follow through and make it happen if the dog doesn't comply. If she can hear and you are absolutely sure she knows what "move" means, then, I'd make her move. :) Not aggressively, not by grabbing her scruff and especially not by getting angry. I'd simply and calmly walk her out of the way.
 

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People can believe whatever they want about Dominance Theory.. to me, it's just a silly bullying tactic. Being a tyrannical leader seems pretty overreactive in terms of controlling a dog.

Instead of thinking of her as struggling for power over you, think about whether or not she really knows what "move" means. And why should she? Because if she does, her fun ends? Try turning the "move" cue into something she gets praised/treated for.. Then she's much more likely to obey because she gets something better than what she's already doing.

My Chihuahua puppy can walk/run in front of me whenever she likes indoors. At doors she stops, sits, and waits when told. If I tell her to sit at any point while she is walking she will. On walks she stops when I stop--no pulling to keep going. I'd say she's pretty under control in terms of obeying and understanding that I determine when and where we go.. And I've never had to use harsh punishment.

Granted, we're still working on remaining calm when strange animals are around.. :p

It takes A LOT of patience and training. Teach her to trust you, not to fear you. Good luck with whatever method you choose. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I wonder if she's hearing you. Have you tested her hearing? Maybe you can do a test at home. Softly call her name when she's looking away. Beagles are known to be a bit stubborn, too.

My advice stands. I never give a command unless I'm prepared to follow through and make it happen if the dog doesn't comply. If she can hear and you are absolutely sure she knows what "move" means, then, I'd make her move. :) Not aggressively, not by grabbing her scruff and especially not by getting angry. I'd simply and calmly walk her out of the way.

Im sure she can hear. She just has selective hearing.
 

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Our dog used to have to be in front to check everything was safe for us! She wasn't telling us where to go or trying to be "on top", she was just checking it was safe. And if she went through a door first it was because she was excited or you were holding something (leash or treat for example) and she wanted to keep eye contact with you. There was always a reason, and it had nothing to do with a dominance theory.

"YOU ARE NOT FIRST, YOU ARE THE DOG NOT THE HUMAN, I AM YOUR PACK LEADER, RESPECT YOUR PACK LEADER. I WILL BE FIRST NOT YOU." After that she would walk behind me or go and lay down. But it is starting back up.
If you are shouting what you put in capitals then the reason she got behind you or went to lie down is probably because you scared her and she no longer wanted to be in your eyeline. Maybe now the scaredness is wearing off, and if so I would take advantage of that and find a new way to tell her what you want. A scared dog isn't going to see you as the "bringer of all good things" that you should be. That doesn't just mean treats and walks, but everything that makes a dog trust you and be willing to follow you.
 

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The dominance, pack leader stuff is excellent, if somewhat unpopular on DF. And you are not going to hurt your dog by grabbing the scruff of his neck.
If a dog is running by as described by the OP and you reach out just in time to 'grab his scruff and pull him back' then yes, you can hurt them. The skin on their neck is not a handle to be jerked around or a means to manhandle the dog into doing what you want.
 

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If you are shouting what you put in capitals then the reason she got behind you or went to lie down is probably because you scared her and she no longer wanted to be in your eyeline. Maybe now the scaredness is wearing off, and if so I would take advantage of that and find a new way to tell her what you want. A scared dog isn't going to see you as the "bringer of all good things" that you should be. That doesn't just mean treats and walks, but everything that makes a dog trust you and be willing to follow you.
As i read this thread i was thinking the same thing. if I even speek in a LOUD voice and cross tone both of my dogs will get up and leave the room everytime. It's instinct ... Dogs dont like conflict. Plain and simple.

First: I am NOT a dog trainer but I've worked with dogs for over 40 years.

If i want my dogs to get out of my way, i just say "back" or "out" and point the direction I want them to go. To start training this, I take a small treat and toss it in the direction I want them to go, I reward with "Good Dog" ... By doing this, you are using the hand signal when you toss the treat and they get a reward for moving.

I always make them SIT and STAY before I open a door and then release them when it is OK for them to move.

If you want your dog to "follow" simply take the time to train the behaivior. I do it by teaching the dog to "come" first. Then I walk around the yard with treats in my hand. When they walk "right behind" my hand, I give a treat and say "good dog". It only takes a short time for the dog to figure out where you want it to be when you are moving.

And this is all done with very little verbal sound, and NO physical contact. Most of the time I dont even have a leash on them, although a lesh can be a great help at first.
 

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I dont really shut. I just make good eye contact to make sure she knows what she did is wrong.

When I first got my dog, eye contact was extremely threatening to him. We had to teach him the look command with treats in order for him not to be fearful when we gave direct eye contact.

By glaring at your dog, you might make him retreat, but it will not help him to understand what it is that you want him to do.
 

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Like others have said above, I will walk through my dog when he is in my way. I don't shove or push or pull him, I just keep walking. Not surprisingly, he moves, most likely because he doesn't want to be stepped on. If I can do this with a 70lb Lab, I'm thinking your Beagle mix can't really be that much of an obstacle.

I have also trained Alvin to step backwards when I make the "beep beep beep" sound a backing truck. This is tedious, though, since he only takes one step at a time. I have to make the noise for a loooong time to actually get him out of my way.

I can see how having the dog stand in your way every time you want to go somewhere would be irritating. I'm confused about part II, though...the dog running ahead of you into your mom's room. Why is this a problem? Is the dog not allowed in that room?
 

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I can see how having the dog stand in your way every time you want to go somewhere would be irritating. I'm confused about part II, though...the dog running ahead of you into your mom's room. Why is this a problem? Is the dog not allowed in that room?
The reason why this is a problem is because the hallway leading to my mom's room is narrow. She will try to run up on the side there for getting close to knocking me over. Some times (and yes I have gotten quicker) I will block her with my leg. If she get caught on the wall (and dont worry I dont do it to hurt her, I barly use force) then she backs up and gives in.
 

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Beagles are famous for being stubborn. I think it's time to break out the treats! My beagle will run in front, behind, and beside me at any time and I don't see it as a dominance thing either. She's usually just excited and wants to go where I'm going. Your dog might just be curious but I don't think she's trying to override you.

Also, my girl knows the command 'wait'. All I had to do to teach her that was make a noise and she would stop then I would give her a treat, once she did that a few times I applied the word wait, basically wait meant stop. She caught on pretty fast and now she's really reliable with it.
 

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The reason why this is a problem is because the hallway leading to my mom's room is narrow. She will try to run up on the side there for getting close to knocking me over. Some times (and yes I have gotten quicker) I will block her with my leg. If she get caught on the wall (and dont worry I dont do it to hurt her, I barly use force) then she backs up and gives in.
Easy solution...make going up and down the stairway into a game.

Up: She's on a Sit/Stay at the bottom of the stairs until you are at the top and call her to Come.

Down: Reverse of Up.

Remember, it's a whole lot easier to teach a dog what you want it to do, rather than what you don't want.
 
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