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Hello,

I just have a couple of questions regarding dogs in general and maybe some others may post other remarks.

1) is it true that we should not look straight into their eyes , but just above?
2) are they really light sleepers ?

Any more are welcome :)

thx
 

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1) I look into Donatello's eyes all the time... He's got the saddest eyes I've ever seen... It's like all the troubles of his past are right there at the brim... And sometimes I'll tell him, "look at me" and he'll look me in the eyes and we'll just kind of sit there like that... He's very expression-full.

2) Donatello's a pretty light-sleeper, but there have been times where he's been so knocked out that I'd have to shake him awake to make sure he's still alive and breathing... I don't do that anymore because now I know he's just really sound-asleep, but the first time he did that I couldn't feel him breathing, heh, and it scared me...
 

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I hear different things on the first question you asked. I wouldn't, however, do it to a strange dog as animals perceive that as a threat. With my own dog I do look in his eyes, but not for too long as I don't want to challenge him in any way.

As for your second question, I believe dogs are light sleepers. Our Luke is and when my grandmother's dog slept over before he was too. Some can fall into a deep sleep, but in general I believe they are.

I heard one myth was that dog's noses don't have to be warm and wet to not be sick. ???
 

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1) it depends. In dog speak starring is often associated with threatening postures, so it would depend on what the dog is reading from your body language. It would also depend on whether you conditioned eye contact to be a good thing.

2) it depends. Sorta like people some of us are light sleepers and some of us are not. And how sleep ready the dog is will vary.
 

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Hello,

I just have a couple of questions regarding dogs in general and maybe some others may post other remarks.

1) is it true that we should not look straight into their eyes , but just above?
2) are they really light sleepers ?

Any more are welcome :)

thx
stairing into their eyes is a sign of dominance! You aren't to look them straight in the eyes, they see that as you challanging them!

Sleeping depends on the dog. I had one that was a light sleeper and woke up to any sound...but I also had one that was a very deep sleeper and a train could go by and not wake him up!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Oh yes ..

3) what is the deal with the dog's nose , is it supposed to to be wet to know when he's feeling ok?
 

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(1) You do this as part of focus training - actually, you train the dog look into your eyes. You also use the "hard stare" to socialize a young puppy - just like his mom or an older dog would do.

You don't do this just for the fun and you certainly don't do it with strange dogs.

(2) Many dogs will respond quickly to noises and other disturbances when they are asleep. But you should not disturb a sleeping dog unnecessarily.

(3) Means nothing.
 

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1) I look into my dog's eyes all the time. When we go to the dog park, usually the other dogs aren't holding still long enough for me to pet them, let alone look into their eyes, lol.

2) During the day my dogs sleep really light, but at night they sleep heavier. After we go to the dog park, there's really nothing that can wake them up. Well...maybe if the house blew up...

3) My dogs noses have been both dry and dripping with fluid. It varies daily and as long as the dog seems fine, it's nothing to worry about.

:)
 

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stairing into their eyes is a sign of dominance! You aren't to look them straight in the eyes, they see that as you challanging them!
No.....that eye contact is a crucial part of all attention training. You want the dog to focus on you and not the distractions but, it requires training.
 

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This is from Preventing Dog Bites in Children, by Ed Frawley. Not sure how accurate it is, comments are welcome.:)

Dogs do not naturally give direct eye contact for any length of time. The only time they get or give eye contact is just before they attack, or just before they flee. So if you have a dominant dog getting direct eye contact from a child, the dog interprets the eye contact as prey that is about to run. That may be enough to trigger an attack.
 

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This is from Preventing Dog Bites in Children, by Ed Frawley. Not sure how accurate it is, comments are welcome.:)

Dogs do not naturally give direct eye contact for any length of time. The only time they get or give eye contact is just before they attack, or just before they flee. So if you have a dominant dog getting direct eye contact from a child, the dog interprets the eye contact as prey that is about to run. That may be enough to trigger an attack.
I disagree. Eye contact is not an absolute precursor for an attack. And I've seen dogs give eye contact for extended periods of time during play.
 

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"watch me" was one of the first things I taught my dogs. If I say watch me they look straight into my eyes and pay no attention to anything else.
That being said--I would never stare right into the eyes of a strange dog--thats asking for trouble.
The sleeping thing is different with each dog and also I think their age.
It seems that when they get old and start to lose their hearing they are not as easily aroused from sleep.
It amazes me how fast the younger ones can go from sound asleep to full speed. I wish I could do that.
 

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I give and get eye contact from Ruby all the time, initiated by either of us. It has nothing to do with dominance, attack or fleeing in our case. But I would never walk up to a strange dog and insist on eye contact from them because how a dog will react to it depends entirely on the individual dog.

I remember reading somewhere that whether the nose is wet or dry doesn't matter, but if it changes from what it usually is then there may be a problem. Eg, the nose might be alternately wet and dry throughout the day, but if it was dripping there might be something that needs checking out
 

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Honey has this habit of coming right up to you if you're sitting on the ground and putting her nose about half an inch away from yours, staring straight into your eyes because she has the most lethal puppy eyes. It's absolutely adorable. BTW, she's the least assertive dog I've ever known.


(bad phone pic)

Sound sleepers vary from dog to dog. Spunky is a SUPER sound sleeper.

As for the nose: look for change in the texture of the nose, not whether it's wet or dry. Spunky's nose is usually dry, so I don't worry about it. I do start worrying when I notice it getting excessively dry or even slightly wet. Honey's nose is wet and I only start worrying when it starts getting dry. In other words, it's a variation from the norm that you need to be worried about, not any definitive level of wetness or dryness.
 

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I'm also going to agree that eye contact does not mean a dog is challenging you. Body posture, as Curbside said, will tell you if the dog is challenging you or looking to play. When I brought Trent home, he wouldn't want to look me in the eye, at least not for extended periods. I had to teach him that eye contact was good, and whenever we play, he'll make eye contact, and when I teach him "heel" I encourage some eye contact.

As for sleeping, Trent is a very light sleeper. If I even shift my arm or turn my head, he'll be immediately glance up to see what I'm doing. He'll also get up and let us know if someone walked up to our house, even if he's sleeping upstairs on my bed.
 

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One way that I understand the staring thing is that you are "pressuring" the dog. If the dog is made uncomfortable by that kind of direct contact he/she may react. My dog, who can sometimes be a bit nervous around new people and animals but has never been aggressive, is trained to do the attention stare with me and my daughter as part of her agility work. She was with me at the baseball game the other day and a young boy (about 7, I would say) asked if he could pet my dog and I said yes. He went right up to her, grabbed her face in both hands, stared straight into her eyes and growled at her. Not too surprisingly, she gave a quick growl back and pulled right away from him. I counseled him that this is not the way you should ever approach a dog you don't know. He (and I) was lucky that my dog is submissive enough that she just got away from him but I can imagine another dog (Like my older dog whom I recently put down) coming right back with a bite.
 

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wow Lwood--you were lucky and to your dog I say----Good dog!!!!! If the kid continues to do that to strange dogs I would say he is going get nailed sooner than later. (and probably right in the face)
 

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Looking directly into a strange dog's eyes could be taken as confrontational by that dog, but I have eye-to-eye contact with my dogs all the time.

Not all dogs are light sleepers. I had a dog who would sleep through a hurricane (or burglers walking off with the entire household of stuff)! LOL
 
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