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Hello there, I'm a new member to the forum. I'm having some pretty significant issues with my dog pulling on the leash. She's a 2 year old lab and I've tried several of the training aids out there. I was able to train my last lab in only a few weeks and she was a great walker. This one just seems to be dead set on pulling. I can go a whole two miles correcting her every few seconds, but she still is at the end of the leash the whole time. I even tried a head collar and she hated it so much she tried to pull it off and would not walk.

I'll be looking forward to searching the site for good advice and suggestions.

Thanks
 

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Hello there, I'm a new member to the forum. I'm having some pretty significant issues with my dog pulling on the leash. She's a 2 year old lab and I've tried several of the training aids out there. I was able to train my last lab in only a few weeks and she was a great walker. This one just seems to be dead set on pulling. I can go a whole two miles correcting her every few seconds, but she still is at the end of the leash the whole time. I even tried a head collar and she hated it so much she tried to pull it off and would not walk.

I'll be looking forward to searching the site for good advice and suggestions.

Thanks
I have the same issue with my dog from time to time, it's mostly when I first walk out the door because he's excited. I think dogs like that see on leash time as just going from A-B so they try and rush it so try and work on the leash just going up and down an area, start in a low distraction area and work your way up and use a hight rate of food reward if your dog is food motivated. If he's toy motivated perhaps play tug at your side while walking down the street.

Basically you need to shift the dog's focus from going forward to going any direction you want and at a pace that isn't on the end of the lead.

I always recommend a front and back clip harness with double ended lead to help shift the gravity of the pull and that helps redirect the dog backwards when pulling but the aim is to get the dog coming back to you or stopping before it hits the end of the leash ideally as bouncing back and forward between pulling and not is confusing and counter productive.

I tend to walk out the door and then drop some treats on the floor for my dog to find, this gets his attention that I'm going to be dropping treats near me so if he's pulling on the lead forward he isn't going to see them and then I gradually shift to holding the treat up towards my waist to get some focus on my body and then gradually to my face so he's paying attention to me.

Some dogs will learn better than others so what may have worked for one dog won't necessarily work or be as productive/quick with another dog but be consistent.
 

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I found that my dogs were in nose mode and had trouble switching to hearing or sight when walking. Teaching them where rewards came from off leash in a safe place first then going outside helped a great deal with that. With a handful of treats walk and when curious dog comes to your side drop a treat or feed dog at your side. To go along with that reward checking in with praise and treats any time they look at me. I randomly reward with food as otherwise one would have a dog staring in your face and you would be shoveling food in them for the whole walk! Then I use the common Be a Tree or Penalty Yards when they forget where I am and pull.

I tried all sorts of things with Sassy but reactive training didn't work. She needed me to show her what I wanted, not get jerked around and trying to guess what I wanted. Doing the Choose to Heel and rewarding checking in finally got a dog that didn't pull. She wasn't actually pulling because I was going too slow, she pulled so she knew where I was. All she needed to do was look at me but neither of us knew that for the longest time.

I also learned that being positive about the annoying sniffing my dogs do works better as well. I could cue and tug all I wanted but the dogs wanted to sniff longer. I switched to praising what I wanted them to do and they sniffed less. I want the dogs to stop sniffing so I praise when they leave the sniff! Sure I was good and sarcastic at the start of this but now I am sincere. Usually anyway. When I started this a free sniff could last for a very long minute, after praising lifting head and moving away sniffs generally last only 30 seconds or so. The dogs were clearly surprised and pleased to hear the praise, I didn't even think praise was any kind of reward for them!

As for excitement on the way out the door freezing helps. I had a Jack Russell who screamed at the top of his very healthy lungs in excitement at getting to go OUT. So I waited. He stopped screaming and I moved forward. He was extremely intelligent and motivated so this worked in a couple days. If you like back up a step to see if dog regains his brain. You may have to back all the way up to taking off the leash and putting it away before the dog understands you mean business. Crazy dog stays home, dog with brain gets to go for a walk.

Do check out the stickies at the top of this sub forum. Loose leash walking is hard to train and most of us have a lot of practice at trying to get our dogs to LLW.
 

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I started out with a standard collar and normal correction. Things like stopping when she pulled, changing directions, and lots of little food bits when she stayed close and did not pull. This worked with my last dog so I just figured it would work with this one. My wife and I tried a front connecting type harness but it seemed to almost encourage her, like she was on a sled harness. We tried the head harness, but she hated it. Sounds like I just need to be persistent and stick with the positive reinforcement.
 

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What really helped my dogs understand LLW was a steady flow of treats (often kibble) while we walked. We started with one treat for every step and slowly added more steps. It took time and tons of patience, but eventually it clicked for us. I also was able to anticipate places they were likely to pull and get their attention on me while they were still walking nicely. Eventually trouble spots became look at mom spots.

Good luck!
 

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My local pet shop (where we get the expensive dog food because my dog has a sensitive stomach) is telling me to try something called the Perfect Walk. They say it has helped their customers when nothing else works. I don't want to try something else without getting some opinions...
 

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I googled it and couldn't find anything definitive. Is it a product or a teaching method or what?

Also agree to keep in mind that teaching LLW usually takes a lot of time. It isn't something that's going to be mastered in a week or two.
 

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Sorry for the multiple posts but yea, as I'm going through the website it seems very gimmicky. They sell it as an alternative to other tools because those tools didn't eliminate pulling. Well... no, of course not, they're not supposed to. Tools like prongs, harnesses, etc are only meant to make a dog manageable so you can work on training them to walk on a loose leash, not as cure-alls.
 

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From the website; "The Perfect Walk is not uncomfortable in any way and does not rely on pain to control your dog's walking behavior"

So... how does it work then?


...by attaching the dog's legs to it's collar?

This is the dumbest thing I've ever seen. I mean, yeah, with you, I'm sure it's uncomfortable, but also.

WHAT?
 

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...by attaching the dog's legs to it's collar?

This is the dumbest thing I've ever seen. I mean, yeah, with you, I'm sure it's uncomfortable, but also.

WHAT?
It kind of reminds me of something I saw on Dragon's Den (Canadian version of those shows where people come on with businesses to try and get investments) and it was some sort of contraption where the poop bag was essentially hung under the dog's butt, so when they pooped it went right into the bag... I guess... in theory.
 

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Good grief. It's like ... some kind .. of :confused: .. bondage gear. For your dog.

Absolutely ridiculous, and I can truly say that I've seen it all now.
 
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